New Cycling Book: Fast After 50 Shows Athletes That Age Is Just a Number

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fa50 72dpi 300pw str

Fast After 50 Shows Athletes That Age Is Just a Number-and Race Results Are the Only Numbers That Count

The baby boomers aren’t giving up, and coach Joe Friel isn’t giving up on them. Friel’s groundbreaking new book, Fast After 50, is for every endurance athlete who wants to stay fast for years to come. For runners, cyclists, triathletes, swimmers, and cross-country skiers, getting older doesn’t have to mean getting slower. Drawing from the most current research on aging and sports performance, Joe Friel-America’s leading endurance sports coach-shows how athletes can stay fast and extend their racing careers. Fast After 50 is now available in bookstores; bike, tri, and running shops; and online. The e-book edition will release this spring. Preview the book at http://www.velopress.com.

In Fast After 50, Friel offers a smart approach for athletes to ward off the effects of age. Friel shows athletes how to extend their racing careers for decades-and race to win. Fast After 50 presents guidelines for high-intensity workouts, focused strength training, recovery, crosstraining, and nutrition for high performance. Friel shows:

* How the body’s response to training changes with age, how to adapt your training plan, and how to avoid overtraining
* How to shed body fat and regain muscle density
* How to create a progressive plan for training, rest, recovery, and competition
* Workout guidelines, field tests, and intensity measurement.

In Fast After 50, Joe Friel shows athletes that age is just a number-and race results are the only numbers that count. Includes contributions from: Mark Allen, Gale Bernhardt, Amby Burfoot, Dr. Larry Creswell, John Howard, Dr. Tim Noakes, Ned Overend, Dr. John Post, Dr. Andrew Pruitt, and Lisa Rainsberger.

Fast After 50: How to Race Strong for the Rest of Your Life Joe Friel Paperback with illustrations throughout. | 7″ x 9″, 336 pp., $21.95, 9781937715267

Joe Friel is the best-selling author of The Triathlete’s Training Bible, The Cyclist’s Training Bible, Going Long, Your Best Triathlon, and Your First Triathlon. His TrainingBible Coaching franchise is one of the most successful and respected in endurance sports. Joe has trained endurance athletes since 1980, including national champions, world championship contenders, and Olympic athletes in triathlon, duathlon, road cycling, and mountain biking. He is an elite-certified USA Triathlon and USA Cycling coach and holds a master’s degree in exercise science. He conducts training and racing seminars around the world and provides consulting services for corporations in the fitness industry. He has also been active in business as the founder of Ultrafit, an association of coaching businesses; TrainingPeaks, a web-based software company; and TrainingBible Coaching.


Colorado making new rules for operating Zip Lines & Rope Courses. Meeting February 6 to find out

OPS AMUSEMENT RIDES AND DEVICES PROGRAM

Stakeholder Meeting Notice

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Proposed Regulation Updates

The Division of Oil and Public Safety (OPS) intends to begin a permanent rule change process for the Amusement Rides and Devices regulations with the purpose of:

  • Adding language for the regulation of trampoline parks;
  • Improving current language in regulations regarding zip line and challenge course operations;
  • Discussing the possibility of adding language for patron responsibility;
  • Clarifying language for reportable injuries; and
  • Updating and/or including applicable standards and definitions, namely:
  • Adopting new standards from American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) F2970-13 (Standard Practice for Design, Manufacture, Installation, Operation, Maintenance, Inspection and Major Modification of Trampoline Courts); and
  • Updating the regulations to reflect the adoption of current ASTM standards.

The draft of the proposed rule changes will be available to download from our website after December 30, 2014.

Stakeholder Meeting Invitation

OPS will begin holding stakeholder meetings to discuss these proposed changes on February 6, 2015, at 1:30 pm in Conference Room 5C at the CDLE offices (633 17th Street, Denver, Colorado 80202).

If you plan to attend the meeting:

  • Please RSVP by sending an email to mailto:cdle_amusements; include your organization’s name and your contact information in your email.
  • When you arrive for the meeting, please check in on the 2nd floor, and then you will be directed to the 5th floor conference room.

If you cannot attend the meeting, we encourage you to submit feedback to Scott Narreau at mailto:scott.narreau or 303-318-8495.


UIAA Ice Climbing Competition set to Begin

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header.pngFOR IMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: office
Tel: +41 (0) 31 370 1828
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2015 UIAA ICE CLIMBING WORLD TOUR PRESENTED BY THE NORTH FACE SET TO BEGIN

More than 200 athletes from 30 countries to compete in six countries


10 December 2014, BERN, Switzerland
: Climbers from across the world will descend on Bozeman, Montana (U.S.A) starting on 11 December 2014 to launch the 2015 UIAA Ice Climbing World Cup Tour.

The Bozeman competition is the first of six events that are held in the U.S.A., Cheongsong (Korea), Saas Fee (Switzerland), Rabenstein (Italy), Champagny-en-Vanoise (France) and Kirov, Russia where the tour concludes on 8 March 2015.

About 200 male and female athletes from 30 nations are expected to compete in the various events throughout the tour.

The competition format includes Speed and Lead (Difficulty) challenges. In Speed, competitors climb up an artificial ice wall in the fastest time. The Lead competition is where athletes are judged on their ability to climb a difficult route in the best time.

World Cup winners are announced at each stage of the tour, and an overall winner is declared at the end.

The 2015 tour will include the bi-annual UIAA World Championships. The Lead competition takes place during in Rabenstein while the Speed takes place in Kirov.

There will be live-streaming for the tour on the competition website accompanied by live results. You can also stay up to date with the tour through the new ice climbing Twitter account, the main UIAA Twitter account and Facebook.

The calendar for the 2014-2015 season is:

  • Bozeman (U.S.A) – UIAA Ice Climbing World Cup: 11 – 14 Dec, 2014
  • Cheongsong (Korea) – UIAA Ice Climbing World Cup: 10 – 11 Jan, 2015
  • UIAA World Youth Ice Climbing Championships (Switzerland): 17 – 18 Jan, 2015
  • Saas Fee (Switzerland) – UIAA Ice Climbing World Cup: 23 – 24 Jan, 2015
  • Rabenstein (Italy) – World Cup & World Championships (Lead): 30 Jan – 01 Feb, 2015
  • Champagny-en-Vanoise(France) – UIAA Ice Climbing World Cup: 05 – 07 Feb, 2015
  • Kirov (Russia) – World Cup & World Championships (Speed): 06 – 08 Mar, 2015

For more information and media please visit iceclimbing

About the UIAA – International Climbing and Climbing Federation

The UIAA was founded in 1932 and has a global presence on five continents with 80 member associations in 50 countries representing 3 million people. The organization’s mission is to promote the growth and protection of climbing and mountaineering worldwide, advance safe and ethical mountain practices and promote responsible access, culture and environmental protection. The UIAA is recognised by the International Olympic Committee for climbing and mountaineering.

UIAA | Monbijoustrasse 61 Postfach CH-3000 | Bern | Switzerland

USA ProChallenge Host Cities for 2015 Announced. Different cities, Going to be a slightly Different Race. Cool!

Host Cities Announced for 2015 USA Pro Challenge

Fans Can Help Shape the Route for America’s Most Difficult Professional Cycling Race

Colorado’s largest sporting event is back for 2015, and today race officials unveiled seven of the host cities that will be highlighted as starts and finishes for the 2015 USA Pro Challenge. Taking place Aug. 17-23, the race will feature several dramatic changes for 2015, including a new overall start in beautiful Steamboat Springs, new host communities Arapahoe Basin and Copper Mountain and a challenging individual time trial course in in the scenic town of Breckenridge. And with six of the seven stages set, organizers are looking to fans to help determine the location of Stage 6.

“The start and finish cities for the 2015 USA Pro Challenge are going to create some unique challenges for the riders while also showcasing some of Colorado’s most beautiful regions to our worldwide audience,” said Rick Schaden, owner of the USA Pro Challenge. “We are always humbled by the amount of interest we receive from cities across the state that want to host the race and we feel confident that the partners we’ve selected this year will help us continue to raise the bar for professional cycling in America.”

After drawing more than 1 million fans each year and generating $130 million in economic impact to the State of Colorado in 2014 alone, the USA Pro Challenge will make its return with an overall start in Steamboat Springs. Over the course of seven days of intensely competitive racing, the world’s best riders will return to iconic Colorado cities that have been key parts of the race in previous years, such as Aspen and Denver.

In a mix of new and prior host cities, the stages of the 2015 USA Pro Challenge include:

  • Stage 1: Monday, Aug. 17 – Steamboat Springs Circuit Race
  • Stage 2: Tuesday, Aug. 18 – Steamboat Springs to Arapahoe Basin
  • Stage 3: Wednesday, Aug. 19 – Copper Mountain Resort to Aspen
  • Stage 4: Thursday, Aug. 20 – Aspen to Breckenridge
  • Stage 5: Friday, Aug. 21 – Breckenridge Individual Time Trial
  • Stage 6: Saturday, Aug. 22 – ???
  • Stage 7: Sunday, Aug. 23 – Golden to Denver

Last year, fans weighed in on the final stage and ultimately determined a route that took the riders from Boulder, through Golden and finished in Downtown Denver. Due to overwhelming fan interest and support, organizers are again letting people have a say in the course. Fans will be able to help shape the race by logging on to www.prochallenge.com/2015stage6 before 11:59 p.m. MT December 12, and giving their opinion on what part of the state Stage 6 should visit.

“Last year we turned to our dedicated fans to help determine the route for the final stage of the Pro Challenge,” said Shawn Hunter, CEO of the USA Pro Challenge. “The enthusiasm and valuable opinions that we received convinced us that we should look to our supporters again for their input on the 2015 race. We know our fans are passionate about the sport and we’re looking forward to hearing where they want Stage 6 to go.”

A new overall start for the Pro Challenge, Steamboat Springs, with a population of just more than 12,000, should see that number at least double on race day. Located just west of the Continental Divide and Rabbit Ears Pass, Steamboat is the perfect location to kick off the race and showcase Colorado’s unique scenic beauty. And as the Colorado city that has produced more Olympians than any other, the riders should feel right at home.

In one of the most significant changes to the 2015 route, Breckenridge will host the individual time trial. Located 9,600 ft. above sea level, this course will test the riders with challenging, hilly terrain. With these additions combined with new host cities Arapahoe Basin and Copper Mountain Resort, the 2015 course will create dramatic moments for the riders and fans.

Known for lung-searing altitudes and intense climbs through the Colorado Rockies, the race is the largest spectator event in the history of the state. The 2014 USA Pro Challenge saw part-time Aspen resident Tejay van Garderen of BMC Racing Team take the overall win for the second year in a row this past August in Denver.

“I am so happy to hear the USA Pro Challenge is going through Aspen again,” said van Garderen. “It is always great to be able to race in front of my family and close friends. Of course, I am curious to see the route they will pick and I am expecting it to be the most challenging route yet.”

Additional details regarding the exact start and finish locations of the 2015 race, as well as the specific, detailed route will be announced in the spring.


It’as Brand New World Out There for the Ropes Course Industry: New F24 sub-committee; F24.61 on Adventure Attractions

At the October meeting in Scottsdale, the Executive Committee approved the addition of a new F24 sub-committee; F24.61 on Adventure Attractions. This sub-committee will be chaired by Phil Slaggert and will include the following activities: trampoline courts, aerial adventure courses, inflatable amusement devices and the walk on water ball activity.

If you would like to be added to this sub-committee you need to login to your account and join F24.61. I have included a screenshot below so you can see where the link is to join additional committees. If you have any trouble, please let me know.


What is happening at theBradford Washburn American Mountaineering Musemen

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Inspire. Preserve. Educate. Interact.Website
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Failing to let go, “volunteer” teacher falls of zip line & recovers $1,650,000

No defenses, no release, just a trail and an appeal which the plaintiff lost. Have EVERYONE sign a release, including staff and volunteers of your guests

Timmer, et al., v. Shamineau Adventures, 2005 Minn. App. Unpub. LEXIS 576

State: Minnesota

Plaintiff: Linda Timmer and her husband Jere Timmer

Defendant: Shamineau Adventures

Plaintiff Claims: Negligence

Defendant Defenses:

Holding: For the Plaintiff, final damages of $1,650,000

Year: 2005

There is not a lot of factual information to be learned in this case. There are several procedural issues that can be helpful in understanding the law as well as identification of a gaping hole in the risk management planning for this defendant. A risk-management weakness that cost the defendant $1,650,000.

The plaintiff was a teacher employed by the school district that was attending the ropes’ course. The case does not state whether this is a worker’s comp subrogation case or whether the plaintiff was working at the time and covered by worker’s compensation.

The ropes course director asked the plaintiff if she wanted to assist with the students at the zip line. The court went into a detailed explanation of the zip line and how it operated. Basically, the zip line was 300 feet long going from a tower to a platform across a valley. The zip line sagged in the middle so the riders slowed as the approached the platform going uphill.

The plaintiff was given a few minutes of instruction and was shown how to detach riders from the zip line on the platform. A student arrived at the platform, and the plaintiff grabbed her and attempted to disconnect her from the zip line. The student started to drift backwards still attached, and the plaintiff grabbed her. The student and plaintiff drifter backwards to the low point of the zip line which left the plaintiff holding on 25’ above the ground. The plaintiff let go and fell suffering injuries.

The plaintiff sued, and the defendant lost at trial. The jury awarded $4.5 million to the plaintiff and split the damages 60% of the liability to the defendant and 40% to the plaintiff. This resulted in an award for the plaintiff of $2,783,949.

Analysis: making sense of the law based on these facts.

The issues on appeal were whether the defense had time to deal with the new plaintiff’s expert witness, whether the jury apportioned the damages correctly, whether a motion for the new trial should have been granted and whether all of this should have allowed the defense to have a continuance. All of those issues are discretionary. That means the judge has discretion to make decisions and unless those decisions are so grossly out of line the appellate court will not over turn them.

One issue that is worth examining, and that is the remittitur. A remittitur is a reduction in the amount awarded by the jury by the judge. The jury awarded $2,783,949. The judge reduced the amount to $1,650,000 in an effort to resolve some of the issues in post-trial motions. Normally, this is done by the judge because the amount awarded by the jury exceeds the amount the plaintiff asks for. The alternative is the judge orders a new trial. This places the plaintiff in a quandary. Try again at trial to get more money or take what the judge has offered.

Here the defense was arguing the amount awarded was excessive, and the other issues enumerated above and the plaintiff had to accept less money than awarded or go through the entire process again.

The appellate court agreed with the trial court on all of its decisions. None of the arguments presented on appeal by the defendant concerned defenses so it is difficult to determine what was a defense at trial.

So Now What?

The hole that is evident in this mess is the plaintiff did not sign a release. A release might have barred a claim by the plaintiff and by any insurance company or worker’s compensation insurance company under its subrogation rights. A release might have stopped this lawsuit. Minnesota has strict requirements on how a release should be written, and a badly written release would have not been effective.

Many times “staff” of the group coming to the event are skipped in the paperwork process. No one should be allowed on the property without signing a release. The staff could have signed up on line or when they arrived. Their releases could have been part that was handed back in when the parents signed releases for their kids. A release for a minor would not have worked in Minnesota if it went that far, but even so, releases may stop someone from suing who is unsure of the legal value of a release.

Always have a well-written release signed by everyone coming to your business, program or activity. That one release might have been worth $1,650,000, interest, costs and the legal fees to defend the case.

What do you think? Leave a comment.

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Copyright 2014 Recreation Law (720) Edit Law

Email: Rec-law@recreation-law.com

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By Recreation Law       Rec-law@recreation-law.com              James H. Moss               #Authorrank

#AdventureTourism, #AdventureTravelLaw, #AdventureTravelLawyer, #AttorneyatLaw, #Backpacking, #BicyclingLaw, #Camps, #ChallengeCourse, #ChallengeCourseLaw, #ChallengeCourseLawyer, #CyclingLaw, #FitnessLaw, #FitnessLawyer, #Hiking, #HumanPowered, #HumanPoweredRecreation, #IceClimbing, #JamesHMoss, #JimMoss, #Law, #Mountaineering, #Negligence, #OutdoorLaw, #OutdoorRecreationLaw, #OutsideLaw, #OutsideLawyer, #RecLaw, #Rec-Law, #RecLawBlog, #Rec-LawBlog, #RecLawyer, #RecreationalLawyer, #RecreationLaw, #RecreationLawBlog, #RecreationLawcom, #Recreation-Lawcom, #Recreation-Law.com, #RiskManagement, #RockClimbing, #RockClimbingLawyer, #RopesCourse, #RopesCourseLawyer, #SkiAreas, #Skiing, #SkiLaw, #Snowboarding, #SummerCamp, #Tourism, #TravelLaw, #YouthCamps, #ZipLineLawyer, Ropes Course, Challenge Course, Zip Line, Shamineau Adventures, Linda Timmer, Platform,

 


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