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Paddlesports Retailer, Madison Wisconsin, What a tradeshow should feel like?

I’ve just finished day one at the Paddlesports Retailer Tradeshow going on now in Madison Wisconsin. It is fantastic. I’m seeing old friends, many I’ve not seen for twenty years. I’m seeing boats that are beautiful and handcrafted that have disappeared from other tradeshows. I’m looking at accessories I did not know existed.

Over the past fifteen years the Paddlesports Industry has felt abandoned by the Outdoor Retailer Summer Tradeshow. During that period, the number of retailers attending Summer OR have continually dropped. This past show, there were probably about a dozen, but I did not count.

There are over 100 exhibitors here. People and products that I had forgotten about. An industry, paddlesports, with a big beating heart that loves water and helping people enjoy the water.

It is a feeling that I’ve not felt at tradeshows for a while, since Outdoor Retailer before it left Reno, NV. When people were excited to attend a tradeshow and looked forward to it. Maybe I’m being nostalgic or dreaming of days long gone and memories are always better than reality. But it just seems….

It is a little laid back, no one rushing down the aisles but that is possibly because you can get around easily, it is small. Larger than OR the first year it was at the Nugget in Reno, but still small. But everyone has a smile on their face. Everyone is happy to be here, and its a tradeshow.

I’ve seen orders being written. I’ve seen people showing lines after the beer came out. I’ve seen people working and product being bought.  I can’t remember the last time I saw an order being written at a tradeshow other than in the Bison Designs booth at OR.

Walking from my hotel in Madison this morning I found myself walking with a retailer. OR came up and he said he had never attended OR. I asked why. He said timing, I would lose thousands to take time off when OR is held and I can’t afford it.  Unsolicited by me. He was also a small Wisconsin retailer.

At the same time, I’ve not seen buyers form the big retailers like REI, etc., It’s a shame. If you believe that paddlesports is what shows up at OR, you are missing out on 90 exhibitors and their products you have not seen. Sure there is overlap, exhibitors, big ones, who attended OR and are here. However I think that is an indication of their support of the idea, rather than a fear of not being here.

The feelings I describe seem to be mirrored by everyone I have talked to at the show. No guarded answers on how things are going, how do you think this will work out or will you come back. All the answers were “this is great, awesome and yes.” People are happy here, people are taking orders and “writing paper” and paper are planning on attending the next one.

The paddlesports manufactures here like the association with other manufacturers in a small exhibit hall. It gives them the opportunity to learn and to shine. Several said it was nice to realize again, they where part of a larger industry.

This show would not have happened with out Darren Bush of Rutabega’s and Sutton Bacon of Nantahala Outdoor Center. Darren’s relationship in the community and knowledge of how conference center’s work, along with and I’m guessing his name and signature brought the show to life.  Sutton Bacon rounded up the hitters to sign on the dotted line to attend.

Are there issues, you bet. You can’t get everything you need here.  The other accessories that a paddlesports shop needs are not going to be here. No stoves (well one stove at the Point 65 booth by Liberty Mountain, no tents, no sleeping bags. None of those things that add up to more dollars spent at a store.  And a lot of those manufacturers are not going to be able to split and do two or more shows. Someone is going to have to give and I suspect, like always it will be the retailers. However if the money item is boats for a retailer, the draw, then this tradeshow is where those retailers need to be.

I was not really thinking of attending, but so many people asked me about the show at OR or told me they were going, I figured it was a Can’t Miss opportunity. I was right.

I’m glad I’m here. I fly home tonight and now wish I had more time to walk and talk the show, to spend more time with old friends, to meet new friends and to enjoy the paddlesports industry.

A little rambling, but an honest evaluation of 24 hours at a new Paddlesports Retailer Tradeshow in Madison.  Thanks Darren & Sutton the team you created to put this together.

Jim

 

 

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Want to learn more about me? Go to the Outdoor Biz Podcast by Rick Saez and hear me tell about my life in the outdoor recreation community

It was great talking to Rick about my outdoor background and how I turned that into a specialization in the law.

The podcast can be found at:

020: Jim Moss- how tax law drove him to Recreation and Adventure Law

iTunes Link: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-outdoor-biz-podcast/id1244919639 

Stitcher Link: https://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=141199&refid=stpr

Thanks Rick, it was great!

What do you think? Leave a comment.

Copyright 2017 Recreation Law (720) 334 8529

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Author: Outdoor Recreation Insurance, Risk Management and Law

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By Recreation Law    Rec-law@recreation-law.com         James H. Moss

  #AdventureTourism, #AdventureTravelLaw,
#AdventureTravelLawyer, #AttorneyatLaw, #Backpacking, #BicyclingLaw, #Camps,
#ChallengeCourse, #ChallengeCourseLaw, #ChallengeCourseLawyer, #CyclingLaw,
#FitnessLaw, #FitnessLawyer, #Hiking, #HumanPowered, #HumanPoweredRecreation,
#IceClimbing, #JamesHMoss, #JimMoss, #Law, #Mountaineering, #Negligence,
#OutdoorLaw, #OutdoorRecreationLaw, #OutsideLaw, #OutsideLawyer, #RecLaw,
#Rec-Law, #RecLawBlog, #Rec-LawBlog, #RecLawyer, #RecreationalLawyer,
#RecreationLaw, #RecreationLawBlog, #RecreationLawcom, #Recreation-Lawcom,
#Recreation-Law.com, #RiskManagement, #RockClimbing, #RockClimbingLawyer,
#RopesCourse, #RopesCourseLawyer, #SkiAreas, #Skiing, #SkiLaw, #Snowboarding,
#SummerCamp, #Tourism, #TravelLaw, #YouthCamps, #ZipLineLawyer, Rick Saze, The
Outdoor Biz Podcast, Podcast, Outdoor Business,

 

 

 

 

 


I was honored by Outdoor Retailer Celebrating 35 years of the Community that Show has Created

I was honored by @OutdoorRetailer in their publication Celebrating  Thirty-Five Years of the People and Passions that Turned an Industry into a Community.

My fellow community members included such luminaries as Peter Kray, Larry Harrison, Yvon Chouinard, Steve Barker, Carson Stanwood, Chad Gallwitz, Sally McCoy, Casey Sheahan, Chris Goddard, Bill Gamber, Peter Metcalf, Conrad Anker, Jen Taylor, James Edward Mills, my good friend Marcus Woolf, and many others. I was truly honored to be included in such a community of people, industry heavy hitters and just plain famous people.

There may not be any real reason to go to the semi annual show you might think, but the feeling of not going, of missing those friends you only see once or twice a year will always bring you back to the show. Where else are you going to get started, get that first interest from a retailer or the media about your idea. Most importantly where else are you going to become part of the outdoor industry.

I remember in 1999 after the tornado had turned the show tents into a field of liter, I worried about what was going to happen to the show. I had worked on several people in the aftermath, including the man who died. I was worried the show would not go on, and I would leave Salt Lake and have no support for my feelings or issues.

I was able to talk to Dr. Eric Weiss, of Adventure Medical Kits who assured me that I had done everything I could to save the people I worked on. I was interviewed by Fred Knapp (Sharp End Publishing) for an article about the tornado, and he asked me one question. I just started talking until I was worn out. It was Outdoor Retailer therapy in a booth. Both would have been difficult if not impossible at home and nowhere could I be in a group of people that understood. I felt safe at a trade show; such a crazy statement. Yet no other industry would even come close to being able to support that statement or feeling of safety. Yet it is the basis for the success of Outdoor Retailer. Because the outdoor industry is a community.

From the thumping of the people, waiting to get on the show floor before the doors opened in Reno and the founding and growth of ORCA (now OIA) to the trying to find a cab and a drink in the first couple of years in Salt Lake, the show has continuously provided an environment to meet, learn, greet and love the people in the outdoor industry community.

It might be the lack of suits. It might be because most of the items on the show floor are for fun. It might be walking the aisles is an Easter egg hunt, looking for that next great idea or invention. It might be because you can have a beer with your friends. I think the biggest reason for the community is smiles. You walk down the aisles of the show floor and you see smiles. Big grins as old friends or just semi annual friends are seeing each other again.

Now it is moving to Denver; If I miss a show, it will only because I’m being recycled in a corn field.

Thank Doug Schnitzspahn (the hardest working man in outdoor media) for finding me on the show floor. Thank you Emerald Expositions and Outdoor Retailer for your help, support and smiles.


These signs will allow regulators and politicians to say we told you so, but they will not help save lives. South Platte River Safety Signs was a good idea until the politicians/regulators thought they knew more.

clip_image002They are way too busy; they are grouped together and have too much wording on them, and you have to be up close to  understand the message. As designed, they can easily be ignored.

A warning sign must pop, tell you one maybe two important things. You are moving on, and you are not going to stop to read more than that. The information has to enter the brain of the person who sees it, without having to be studied. If you want more information, it should be there, but you have to get the point across the first time.

These signs don’t do that. Unless someone is lost and looking at the trail map, these signs will never be noticed by anyone.

These signs were designed to be located along the South Platte River as it leaves the Chatfield Reservoir and heads north through Arapahoe County, Littleton and eventually Denver. From the dam to the confluence with Cherry Creek (where the down town REI is located) is around 15 miles. A beautiful path follows the trail from the reservoir past the confluence connecting with more than a dozen other trails. Some sections are a little industrial, but overall it is a fun place to ride, run, walk your dog, watch birds and during hot summer, days float down the river.

The river has been designed over the decades to allow for access and use. Dams all have spillways and can be easily navigated by hard-shell kayak or inflatable tube. Three more river side parks have been added, one with two surfing holes just in the past year. On a cool day, you can see stand up paddleboarders, surfers in wetsuits and kayakers playing in the holes at the river. On a hot day, the river is wall to wall people in a short 5-mile section. On the Fourth of July, I counted 300 people surfing, kayaking, inflatable kayaking and 90% of the tubing. Of the tubers, 50% had a cooler floating down the river also. On that day, I counted 18 PFDs.

The original intent of the signs was to give information and warning to the people recreating on the river. I was part of the
South Platte Signage group that created a group of signs to be ready to go early in 2017. The sign above was posted sometime after the Fourth of July and more than 20 days above 90 degrees.

When the South Platte Signage committee was done the designs were handed over to the governing body for this section of the South Platte. That was seven months ago. Someone did not like the original signs and had them done. What they ended up with is busy artwork that you can’t comprehend unless you concentrate. That is not a sign that gets your attention or makes you think.

The original signs were made to stand out. You can understand their purpose from a distance. They work as a standalone product, each little sign meaning one thing or as a grouping as needed.  This one was placed below the access point for the biggest wave on the river. Not really great planning, it needed to be above, or it needs to be where people leave the parking lot wherever they intend to get on the river.

The “Float Sober” sign completely misses the mark. There are other items legal in Colorado besides alcohol and a lot of thing’s people on the river use that are not. Sober refers to alcohol. “Be Smart” covers everything.

I’m I complaining because they changed the work I helped produce. Probably there are some hurt feelings. More importantly as an attorney in the outdoor recreation industry that has litigated sign issues; I see another set of signs that will only be seen by a jury.

As you well know, signs are hard to create, other than to produce a CYA in a courtroom. Although there were a lot of discussion and research into those issues, the most important thing, the signs were developed for was to keep people safe. To make them take 2 seconds to think.

The original design was intended to be a national model and still  is. Anyone can get permission to use the system. The South Platte signs might cost you, no one is sure.

The color in the original system was used to make the warning part of the sign jump, not make the design cute. Cute is for puppies, warning signs have to get someone’s attention.

The design can even be used as a two-color system if  money becomes an issue.

The original work is available to anyone who wants to use it free of charge. If you are interested contact Risa Shimoda, Executive Director of the River Management Society. executivedirector@river-management.org (301) 585-4677 http://www.river-management.org/

The otter in the new signs is not wearing a PFD in three of the pictures. In the duck ones, the duck is wearing a PFD. The most important point to get across on any body of water is to wear a PFD.

I was riding my bike when I saw the sign, in fact I had ridden past the sign before I realized what it was and I was constantly looking for the signs. Rangers were probably getting tired of me asking when the river safety signs were going up. When I turned around to go back to read the signs I could not read them or recognize what they were saying standing on the bike path. I walked to the path leading down to the river, (not a put in, just closer to the river.), which was closer to the signs and how people might try to access the river. I finally ended up standing on the grass in front of the sign to see the designs and read the sign.

clip_image008Why am I writing this? Because a lot of people in the parks and  recreation industry face this every day. Professionals are hired to do a job, which always includes the park employees and some politician or bureaucrat mess’s things up.  They might think the sign is  prettier; they think an otter is better than a duck. (Ducks which are found up and down the South Platte and most rivers in North America.)

Worse, their changes add months to the final project which put people at risk.

Is the otter that much better of a symbol to save lives that a lot of people got to miss it, and based on where this sign is, continue to miss it?

Show this to the politician/manager/bureaucrat getting on your way, or send me their contact info, and I’ll send it to them so you don’t have to put your head on the chopping block. (Remember an attorney-client privilege.

Let the experts, the employees you employ to run our parks, our open spaces, our state parks, our national forests, and our national monuments and parks do what they have been educated in and trained to do. Run the parks, you run the country…..or at least your little fiefdom and stay out of the parks, unless you are there to enjoy the day.

What do you think? Leave a comment.

If you like this
let your friends know or post it on FB, Twitter or LinkedIn

Author: Outdoor Recreation Insurance, Risk Management and
Law

To Purchase Go Here:

Copyright 2017 Recreation Law (720) Edit Law

Email: Rec-law@recreation-law.com

Google+: +Recreation

Twitter: RecreationLaw

Facebook: Rec.Law.Now

Facebook Page: Outdoor Recreation & Adventure Travel Law

Blog:www.recreation-law.com

Mobile Site: http://m.recreation-law.com

By Recreation
Law   
Rec-law@recreation-law.com         James H. Moss

 #AdventureTourism, #AdventureTravelLaw,
#AdventureTravelLawyer, #AttorneyatLaw, #Backpacking, #BicyclingLaw, #Camps,
#ChallengeCourse, #ChallengeCourseLaw, #ChallengeCourseLawyer, #CyclingLaw,
#FitnessLaw, #FitnessLawyer, #Hiking, #HumanPowered, #HumanPoweredRecreation,
#IceClimbing, #JamesHMoss, #JimMoss, #Law, #Mountaineering, #Negligence,
#OutdoorLaw, #OutdoorRecreationLaw, #OutsideLaw, #OutsideLawyer, #RecLaw,
#Rec-Law, #RecLawBlog, #Rec-LawBlog, #RecLawyer, #RecreationalLawyer,
#RecreationLaw, #RecreationLawBlog, #RecreationLawcom, #Recreation-Lawcom,
#Recreation-Law.com, #RiskManagement, #RockClimbing, #RockClimbingLawyer,
#RopesCourse, #RopesCourseLawyer, #SkiAreas, #Skiing, #SkiLaw, #Snowboarding,
#SummerCamp, #Tourism, #TravelLaw, #YouthCamps, #ZipLineLawyer, South Platte, South Platte River, Carson Nature Center, South Platte River Signage, South Platte River Safety Signage, South Platte River Safety Signage Committee, River Safety, PFD, Safe Boating,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Crisis Communication

What do you do when someone gets hurt?

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http://www.slideshare.net/JHMoss/crisis-communication-57527422

Audience:                 Colorado Bicycle Event Coalition

Location:                  REI Downtown, Denver, COlorado

Date:                        January 21, 2016

Presentation:            Crisis Communication

For additional articles on the subject see:

10 Signs of Great Risk Management                                        http://rec-law.us/sUzpHT

7 Mistakes Made by People who are called Defendant         http://rec-law.us/stli09

Crisis Response                                                                           http://rec-law.us/ul6Nrl

Reasons Why People Sue                                                         http://rec-law.us/uZ5RKR

Ten Commandments of Dealing with People in a Crisis      http://rec-law.us/KoI8Xo

Remember the law changes constantly, this presentation may be out of date. Check back at www.recreation-law.com and with your attorney to make sure the information is still valid.

What do you think? Leave a comment.

If you like this let your friends know or post it on FB, Twitter or LinkedIn

Copyright 2016 Recreation Law (720) Edit Law

Email: Rec-law@recreation-law.com

Google+: +Recreation

Twitter: RecreationLaw

Facebook: Rec.Law.Now

Facebook Page: Outdoor Recreation & Adventure Travel Law

Blog: www.recreation-law.com

Mobile Site: http://m.recreation-law.com

By Recreation Law    Rec-law@recreation-law.com         James H. Moss         #Authorrank

<rel=”author” link=” https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/112453188060350225356/” />

 

 

#AdventureTourism, #AdventureTravelLaw, #AdventureTravelLawyer, #AttorneyatLaw, #Backpacking, #BicyclingLaw, #Camps, #ChallengeCourse, #ChallengeCourseLaw, #ChallengeCourseLawyer, #CyclingLaw, #FitnessLaw, #FitnessLawyer, #Hiking, #HumanPowered, #HumanPoweredRecreation, #IceClimbing, #JamesHMoss, #JimMoss, #Law, #Mountaineering, #Negligence, #OutdoorLaw, #OutdoorRecreationLaw, #OutsideLaw, #OutsideLawyer, #RecLaw, #Rec-Law, #RecLawBlog, #Rec-LawBlog, #RecLawyer, #RecreationalLawyer, #RecreationLaw, #RecreationLawBlog, #RecreationLawcom, #Recreation-Lawcom, #Recreation-Law.com, #RiskManagement, #RockClimbing, #RockClimbingLawyer, #RopesCourse, #RopesCourseLawyer, #SkiAreas, #Skiing, #SkiLaw, #Snowboarding, #SummerCamp, #Tourism, #TravelLaw, #YouthCamps, #ZipLineLawyer, Crisis Communication, Crisis, Guests, Injured Guest, Lawsuit Prevention, Cycling, Bicycling, Cycling Event, Colorado Bicycle Event Coalition,

 


I start teaching tomorrow: Ski Area Operations Risk Management

Hurry and sign up you’ll get 45 hours of me for the price of 3.

Colorado Mountain College Ski Area Operations Risk Management

Program at a Glance

Degree: Ski Area Operation (AAS)

Certificates: Ropeway Maintenance Technician, Ski Patrol Operations, and Slope and Trail Maintenance

Cost: $57/credit-hour (in-district), $373/credit-hour (out-of-state)

Oh you can feel sorry for the 19 & 20 year students will be suffering with me for 45 hours this fall.

Fridays: Leadville, Colorado

9:00 AM to 2:00 PM (plus a lunch break)

This also means for the next ten (10) Fridays I’ll be unavailable by phone or email for most of the day. Call or email and I’ll get back to you during a break.

What do you think? Leave a comment.

If you like this let your friends know or post it on FB, Twitter or LinkedIn

Copyright 2015 Recreation Law (720) Edit Law

Email: Rec-law@recreation-law.com

Google+: +Recreation

Twitter: RecreationLaw

Facebook: Rec.Law.Now

Facebook Page: Outdoor Recreation & Adventure Travel Law

Blog: www.recreation-law.com

Mobile Site: http://m.recreation-law.com

By Recreation Law    Rec-law@recreation-law.com         James H. Moss

#AdventureTourism, #AdventureTravelLaw, #AdventureTravelLawyer, #AttorneyatLaw, #Backpacking, #BicyclingLaw, #Camps, #ChallengeCourse, #ChallengeCourseLaw, #ChallengeCourseLawyer, #CyclingLaw, #FitnessLaw, #FitnessLawyer, #Hiking, #HumanPowered, #HumanPoweredRecreation, #IceClimbing, #JamesHMoss, #JimMoss, #Law, #Mountaineering, #Negligence, #OutdoorLaw, #OutdoorRecreationLaw, #OutsideLaw, #OutsideLawyer, #RecLaw, #Rec-Law, #RecLawBlog, #Rec-LawBlog, #RecLawyer, #RecreationalLawyer, #RecreationLaw, #RecreationLawBlog, #RecreationLawcom, #Recreation-Lawcom, #Recreation-Law.com, #RiskManagement, #RockClimbing, #RockClimbingLawyer, #RopesCourse, #RopesCourseLawyer, #SkiAreas, #Skiing, #SkiLaw, #Snowboarding, #SummerCamp, #Tourism, #TravelLaw, #YouthCamps, #ZipLineLawyer, CMC, Colorado Mountain College, Ski Area Operations, Risk Management, SAO, Leadville,

 


Outdoor Recreation Insurance, Risk Management and Law Available Now

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Available Now!

Outdoor Recreation Insurance, Risk Management, and Law

James H. Moss

As the field of outdoor recreation continues to grow, risk and risk management continue to take on a greater level of importance. Smart organizations see changes coming and evolve and adapt with new strategies for managing risk. In the late 1980s, the outdoor recreation industry moved into the litigation phase and the number of court cases grew exponentially. It is unlikely that litigation and the importance of risk management will be moving out of this field in the 21st century. Outdoor Recreation Insurance, Risk Management, and Law was developed to help train and educate students and professionals in the field. The author, James H. Moss, is the leading expert in the field of outdoor recreation, insurance, risk management, and the law.
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Table of Contents

Chapter One

Outdoor Recreation Risk Management, Law, and Insurance: An Overview

Chapter Two

U.S. Legal System and Legal Research

Chapter Three

Risk

Chapter Four

Risk, Accidents, and Litigation: Why People Sue

Chapter Five

Law

Chapter Six

Statutes That Affect Outdoor Recreation

Chapter Seven

Preinjury Contracts to Prevent Litigation: Releases

Chapter Eight

Defenses to Claims

Chapter Nine

Minors

Chapter Ten

Skiing and Ski Areas

Chapter Eleven

Other Commercial Recreational Activities

Chapter Twelve

Water Sports, Paddlesports, and Water-Based Activities

Chapter Thirteen

Rental Programs

Chapter Fourteen

Insurance

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For Single Hard Copy Click Here

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Print

 Price: $80.00

 ISBN: 978-1-57167-746-4

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E-book

Price: $40.00

ISBN: 978-1-57167-747-1

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Product Information

Copyright: 2015

Format: Paperback

Dimensions: 7 x 10

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Desk Copy Policy

If you are a college or university instructor, you may request a desk copy for a 45-day review period. If you adopt the book as your course text and place an order through your bookstore, notify us, and the desk copy is yours to keep. If you do not adopt the book, you may (a) return it in mint condition or (b) purchase it at a 50% discount. Desk copies may be requested on our website by logging in with an educator account and clicking the desk copy link located on the book’s webpage.

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