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The ASTM is voting on new terminology for terrain park jumps.

If you manage a ski area or work in the terrain park you MUST know about these changes.

The easiest way to get them is to become a member of the ASTM. The cost is only $75.00 per year to get involved. Although this may seem a little like ransom, it costs to find out how you are going to be affected, look at it from the perspective of it costs $75.00 to become involved and help your industry.

The only way you can access the information or vote is to be a member of the ASTM.

If you don’t the consequences could be dire.

The new description of a terrain park jump identifies twenty (20) different parks of a jump. If you are describing a jump on the
witness stand, you want to make sure that the term you use to describe a part of the jump is fully understood and defined to all the people involved.

The vote on these changes ends August 31, 2017 so get involved now:  Terminology Of Snow Sport Freestyle Terrain Park Jumps WK51845 PDF (368K)

Do Something

If you are in the ski industry, join the ASTM now!

What do you think? Leave a comment.

Copyright 2017 Recreation Law (720) 334 8529

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If you are interested in having me write your release, fill out this Information
Form and Contract and send it to me.

Author: Outdoor Recreation Insurance, Risk Management and Law

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These signs will allow regulators and politicians to say we told you so, but they will not help save lives. South Platte River Safety Signs was a good idea until the politicians/regulators thought they knew more.

clip_image002They are way too busy; they are grouped together and have too much wording on them, and you have to be up close to  understand the message. As designed, they can easily be ignored.

A warning sign must pop, tell you one maybe two important things. You are moving on, and you are not going to stop to read more than that. The information has to enter the brain of the person who sees it, without having to be studied. If you want more information, it should be there, but you have to get the point across the first time.

These signs don’t do that. Unless someone is lost and looking at the trail map, these signs will never be noticed by anyone.

These signs were designed to be located along the South Platte River as it leaves the Chatfield Reservoir and heads north through Arapahoe County, Littleton and eventually Denver. From the dam to the confluence with Cherry Creek (where the down town REI is located) is around 15 miles. A beautiful path follows the trail from the reservoir past the confluence connecting with more than a dozen other trails. Some sections are a little industrial, but overall it is a fun place to ride, run, walk your dog, watch birds and during hot summer, days float down the river.

The river has been designed over the decades to allow for access and use. Dams all have spillways and can be easily navigated by hard-shell kayak or inflatable tube. Three more river side parks have been added, one with two surfing holes just in the past year. On a cool day, you can see stand up paddleboarders, surfers in wetsuits and kayakers playing in the holes at the river. On a hot day, the river is wall to wall people in a short 5-mile section. On the Fourth of July, I counted 300 people surfing, kayaking, inflatable kayaking and 90% of the tubing. Of the tubers, 50% had a cooler floating down the river also. On that day, I counted 18 PFDs.

The original intent of the signs was to give information and warning to the people recreating on the river. I was part of the
South Platte Signage group that created a group of signs to be ready to go early in 2017. The sign above was posted sometime after the Fourth of July and more than 20 days above 90 degrees.

When the South Platte Signage committee was done the designs were handed over to the governing body for this section of the South Platte. That was seven months ago. Someone did not like the original signs and had them done. What they ended up with is busy artwork that you can’t comprehend unless you concentrate. That is not a sign that gets your attention or makes you think.

The original signs were made to stand out. You can understand their purpose from a distance. They work as a standalone product, each little sign meaning one thing or as a grouping as needed.  This one was placed below the access point for the biggest wave on the river. Not really great planning, it needed to be above, or it needs to be where people leave the parking lot wherever they intend to get on the river.

The “Float Sober” sign completely misses the mark. There are other items legal in Colorado besides alcohol and a lot of thing’s people on the river use that are not. Sober refers to alcohol. “Be Smart” covers everything.

I’m I complaining because they changed the work I helped produce. Probably there are some hurt feelings. More importantly as an attorney in the outdoor recreation industry that has litigated sign issues; I see another set of signs that will only be seen by a jury.

As you well know, signs are hard to create, other than to produce a CYA in a courtroom. Although there were a lot of discussion and research into those issues, the most important thing, the signs were developed for was to keep people safe. To make them take 2 seconds to think.

The original design was intended to be a national model and still  is. Anyone can get permission to use the system. The South Platte signs might cost you, no one is sure.

The color in the original system was used to make the warning part of the sign jump, not make the design cute. Cute is for puppies, warning signs have to get someone’s attention.

The design can even be used as a two-color system if  money becomes an issue.

The original work is available to anyone who wants to use it free of charge. If you are interested contact Risa Shimoda, Executive Director of the River Management Society. executivedirector@river-management.org (301) 585-4677 http://www.river-management.org/

The otter in the new signs is not wearing a PFD in three of the pictures. In the duck ones, the duck is wearing a PFD. The most important point to get across on any body of water is to wear a PFD.

I was riding my bike when I saw the sign, in fact I had ridden past the sign before I realized what it was and I was constantly looking for the signs. Rangers were probably getting tired of me asking when the river safety signs were going up. When I turned around to go back to read the signs I could not read them or recognize what they were saying standing on the bike path. I walked to the path leading down to the river, (not a put in, just closer to the river.), which was closer to the signs and how people might try to access the river. I finally ended up standing on the grass in front of the sign to see the designs and read the sign.

clip_image008Why am I writing this? Because a lot of people in the parks and  recreation industry face this every day. Professionals are hired to do a job, which always includes the park employees and some politician or bureaucrat mess’s things up.  They might think the sign is  prettier; they think an otter is better than a duck. (Ducks which are found up and down the South Platte and most rivers in North America.)

Worse, their changes add months to the final project which put people at risk.

Is the otter that much better of a symbol to save lives that a lot of people got to miss it, and based on where this sign is, continue to miss it?

Show this to the politician/manager/bureaucrat getting on your way, or send me their contact info, and I’ll send it to them so you don’t have to put your head on the chopping block. (Remember an attorney-client privilege.

Let the experts, the employees you employ to run our parks, our open spaces, our state parks, our national forests, and our national monuments and parks do what they have been educated in and trained to do. Run the parks, you run the country…..or at least your little fiefdom and stay out of the parks, unless you are there to enjoy the day.

What do you think? Leave a comment.

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Law

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Law   
Rec-law@recreation-law.com         James H. Moss

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#SummerCamp, #Tourism, #TravelLaw, #YouthCamps, #ZipLineLawyer, South Platte, South Platte River, Carson Nature Center, South Platte River Signage, South Platte River Safety Signage, South Platte River Safety Signage Committee, River Safety, PFD, Safe Boating,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Additional Insured Certificates: they are just a piece of paper, unless they are part of a contract or there is an insurable interest

There seems to be a hue and cry about collecting additional insured certificates. Unless you need TP or want to wall paper an office wall, they are worthless unless the insurance company/business issuing the certificate recognizes an insurance defined insurable interest, in advance, or you have a contract that identifies an insurable interest and recognizes the need for the certificate.

The latest catch word after this fall’s conferences runs seems to be collect additional insured certificates from everyone. Although this sound’s good and an easy way to solve a problem, legally, it is just another way to kill trees. If nothing else, it will keep you in litigation for another decade between your insurance company and the one issuing the certificate fighting over whether it is valid.

Most Additional Insured Certificates of Zero value to you from an insurance standpoint.

The basis for issuing a certificate listing someone else as an additional insured, or covered by a particular policy is there must be an insurable interest.

Indemnity – Insurable Interest

Insurable interest arose out of defining indemnity. You agree to indemnify another party of their loss. The simplest way to look at this is your relationship with you and your automobile insurance policy. If you have a loss to your car, your insurance policy will indemnify you for that loss. Insurance companies have taken that one step further these days by taking over the loss and doing all the legwork, including paying the repair facility directly.

When those indemnification agreements were larger than the money on hand or the value of the business issuing the indemnification, other ways were developed to “come up with the money” to cover the indemnification. Eventually, insurance played a role in indemnifying a third party for the losses they might incur, even though the insurance policy is issued in the name of the insured.

Think about you, a certificate of insurance is issued to the insured, which was underwritten and covers someone else who was not. Don’t you think there is more to this than just issuing a piece of paper?

Issuing Policy must cover risks of the claims identified in the certificate or the agreement.

By the very nature of the definition, simplified above, you can see there are several issues present. The insurance policy is only going to cover the third party for risks that are insured. That means if the policy issued to you says it will only cover A, B and C as risks, then a claim of Z by the third party will not be covered. No matter what the certificate of insurance says, it only covers the risks insured by the original policy for the original insured.

So even before we get to whether the certificate is valid, you must make sure the policy issuing the certificate lists the claims that the certificate is expected to cover.

You have to look at the certificate itself and see if it covers anything, let alone what you need.

Legally recognizable insurable interest

The next issue is insurance policies only cover if there is a legally recognizable interest in the possible loss. That is called an “insurable interest.”

An insurable interest means the person buying the policy has a legally recognized loss that the policy will cover. The best examples are in the negative.  I cannot buy an insurance policy on my neighbor’s house. I don’t own the house; the house does not secure a debt the neighbor owes me. I have nothing invested in the neighbor’s house; therefore, I have no insurable interest in the neighbor’s house.

Another example would be life insurance. I do not have an insurable interest that would be recognized to buy a life insurance policy on my neighbor. My neighbor’s death would not cause me a loss.

Normally, life insurance policies are only issued to relatives of the insured. The exception is if you could prove an economic loss to you because someone died. So business partners can buy life insurance policies on each other because if one partner died, the other would have to hire someone to do that partners work, and you might have to buy the surviving family members of the deceased interest in the business.

Example; my neighbor and I contractually agreed upon the death of one of us to take care of the other’s property. I would then suffer a loss if my neighbor died so I might be able to purchase a life insurance policy on my neighbor. I would have to prove the contract existed and that a real value existed for the loss I might incur. I would have to prove by contract that I have an insurable interest in my neighbor.

I’m using examples in property insurance, life and health insurance and liability insurance to get these points across. An insurable interest is different in the different types of polices, health, life, property or liability, but not enough to worry about for this discussion.

Insurable interest

Insurable interests arise “naturally” in the law. When a building is purchased the bank making the loan to finance the purchase has an insurable interest. If the property is destroyed, then the banks’ chances of receiving the rest of the loan are diminished, therefore, there is an insurable interest in the bank to insure against loss. Either the bank can buy a policy covering the property or the bank can require as part of the loan that the owner/borrower insure the property for the value of the property listing the bank as an additional insured.

Landlords have a similar insurable interest. They are listed as additional insured’s under their tenant’s policy. If the property is destroyed by actions of the tenant, the landlord will lose the property or at least the rental income. Therefore, they have an insurable interest recognized by the insurance company issuing the tenant’s policy.

Another example is a ski area operating on US Forest Service land. The US Forest Service is the landowner or landlord, and the ski area is the tenant. If the ski area destroys the property, the US Forest Service suffers a loss. So the US Forest Service is listed under the ski area’s policy as an additional insured, and the Forest Service is reimbursed for the loss of value to their land.

This particular insurable interest covers two issues for the US Forest Service. It covers any loss to the property the Forest Service may have, and it protects them from lawsuits if they are joined in a suit with the ski area. The ski area, as the permittee (or tenant) was responsible for the property at the time of the injury to the guest skiing. The US Forest Service did not make the snow, groom or run the lifts; however, as the landlord or owner of the property, the Forest Service maybe sued. As such, the US Forest Service has an insurable interest covered by the ski area for a possible lawsuit.

General or Special Liability Policies and Insurable Interest

Liability interests work the same way. If a skier hits a tree in the ski area and suffers injury, the skier can sue the ski area or the US Forest Service. The ski area is the tenant who received value for the skier being on the land, and the US Forest Service owns the tree. Both can be sued. The agreement between the Forest Service and the ski area then says the ski area must protect the Forest Service from any lawsuit due to the ski area’s occupation or control of the land. By contract and law, the Forest Service has an insurable interest that will be recognized by the ski area’s insurance company.

The owner of the land where a rafting company takes their passenger’s and boats out of the water has an insurable interest. If someone falls down getting out of the boat, both may be sued. Was it the rafting companies fault for where they put the boat or the landowner’s for how the takeout was created? Since the landowner has limited control over the takeout while being used by the rafting company, he should be covered as an additional insured because he has an insurable interest. The chance of a lost due to the acts of someone he contracts with creating liability for him.

What about a restaurant that provides lunches to the rafting company? Who should receive the certificate of additional insured from whom? The rafting company could be sued because the lunch made a customer ill. The rafting company should receive a certificate of insurance from the lunch provider. At the same time, the illness may have been caused by the way the lunch was stored or prepared, so therefore the lunch provider should be an additional insured on the Rafting company’s policy.

It is these situations where both insurance companies can struggle during litigation or a contract properly written in advance might save one or both company’s time and money.

What if the rafting company stops and has their customers walk up the bank and have lunch in a restaurant at the side of the river? If the lunches are part of the trip and the restaurant is the only option, maybe the rafting company should receive a certificate of insurance from the restaurant. However, if the customer is free to pick any meal, they want from one of the several restaurants, probably not. That would be like a restaurant on the side of an interstate asking for certificates of insurance from all trucking companies.

Would the possible insurable interest change if the rafting company received a commission from the restaurant? Yes, the insurable interest would be more compelling because there is a clear financial benefit flowing between the parties. What if the restaurant provided free lunches to the raft guides?

Unless the insurance company recognizes, either by industry or insurance practice that an insurable interest exists or that one is created by contract, that is covered under the policy, having a piece of paper with additional insured on it with you name means nothing. You must prove an insurable interest to prove legal coverage.

(And that is not even getting into the disclaimers listed on many certificates.)

Where are certificates of insurance valid by practice in the outdoor recreation industry? Between:

·         Retailers and Manufacturers

·         Landlords and Tenants

·         Federal Land Managers and Concession or Permit Holders

·         Contractors and the Hiring Company

Every other situation you should check with your attorney or get a contract that identifies the insurable interest and requires a certificate of insurance is issued with coverage for the issue. Even better, require that the contract be given to the insuring insurance company and the necessary language into the contract be incorporated into the certificate of insurance. Otherwise, you may spend more time and money litigating with the certificate issues covers the issue that was litigated.

Issuing additional insured certificates without thinking the process through is also a risk. First insurance companies look at how many and who you issue certificates too. If they see large number or risks or big risks, they can and do increase your premium to cover the additional risks.  So make sure you understand why and the value of issuing a certificate of insurance from your policy also.

Every year when prior to your policy coming up for renewal, you should look through your list of parties you issue certificates of insurance to and see if they still need to be issued. Once you list someone the list is never reduced or culled except by you. I’ve seen insurance policies with over a hundred business listed as insurable interests. When we got done, we only had twenty certificates to issue. Many of the old certificates were issued to companies the client was no longer doing business with or with business who had gone out of business.

This does affect your premium so be aware!

Do Something

Without an insurable interest, a certificate of insurance is worthless and probably is going to be costly. Any insurance company paying a claim is going to look for anyone else to share in that claim. Consequently, they will pull the insured into the claim knowing it may not be valid, but willing to fight that issue out in later years. You requesting your insurance company to issue certificates could pull you into litigation both the original and the later certificate validity litigation for years, for something you had no legal interest in.

Just issuing the certificate or receiving one is not enough. You must identify when and how it is valid. That requires a contract. That contract must say more than you will issue a certificate of insurance. It must identify what the certificate is insuring and why. It must identify an insurable interest.

Insurance companies are not going to issue a check just because they issued a certificate. Make sure everyone understands how, when and why, and you’ll make that process quicker, easier and without litigation.

Think about all the work you had to go through to purchase the policy in the first place. Do you believe your insurance company is going to issue another policy just because you said so? Not unless the insurance company believes the chances of paying a claim under the certificate is very very slim.

What do you think? Leave a comment.

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Author: Outdoor Recreation Insurance, Risk Management and Lawclip_image002_thumb.jpg

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By Recreation Law    Rec-law@recreation-law.com         James H. Moss

#AdventureTourism, #AdventureTravelLaw, #AdventureTravelLawyer, #AttorneyatLaw, #Backpacking, #BicyclingLaw, #Camps, #ChallengeCourse, #ChallengeCourseLaw, #ChallengeCourseLawyer, #CyclingLaw, #FitnessLaw, #FitnessLawyer, #Hiking, #HumanPowered, #HumanPoweredRecreation, #IceClimbing, #JamesHMoss, #JimMoss, #Law, #Mountaineering, #Negligence, #OutdoorLaw, #OutdoorRecreationLaw, #OutsideLaw, #OutsideLawyer, #RecLaw, #Rec-Law, #RecLawBlog, #Rec-LawBlog, #RecLawyer, #RecreationalLawyer, #RecreationLaw, #RecreationLawBlog, #RecreationLawcom, #Recreation-Lawcom, #Recreation-Law.com, #RiskManagement, #RockClimbing, #RockClimbingLawyer, #RopesCourse, #RopesCourseLawyer, #SkiAreas, #Skiing, #SkiLaw, #Snowboarding, #SummerCamp, #Tourism, #TravelLaw, #YouthCamps, #ZipLineLawyer, Certificate of Insurance, Additional Insured, Insurance Company, Insurable Interest,

 


Summer 2016 Commercial Fatalities

This list is not guaranteed to be accurate. The information is found from web searches and news dispatches. Those references are part of the chart. If you have a source for information on any fatality please leave a comment or contact me. Thank you.

If this information is incorrect or incomplete please let me know.  This is up to date as of June 15, 2016. Thanks.

Rafting, Mountaineering, Skiing out of bounds and other sports are probably still safer than your kitchen or bathroom. This information is not to scare you away from any activity but to help you understand the risks and to study.

Red is a probable death due to medical issues unrelated to the activity

Blue is an employee fatality

Dark blue is a death of an employee while working

Date

Activity

State

Location

What

Age

Sex

Location 2

Reference

Ref 2

Company

3/22

Cat Skiing

OR

Mt. Bailey

Avalanche, hit tree

 

M

 

http://rec-law.us/1XSFbT7

 

Cat Ski Mount Bailey

5/4

Whitewater Rafting

WA

Wenatchee River

Raft Flipped

53

M

Dryden

http://rec-law.us/1TuBuzC

 

Orion River

 

Whitewater Rafting

ME

Dead River

Fell out

52

M

 

http://rec-law.us/22B3zeY

http://rec-law.us/1U0HrbU

North Country Rivers

5/22

Whitewater Rafting

CO

Arkansas River

Fell out

61

F

Parkdale

http://rec-law.us/1r4zOp3

http://rec-law.us/1O75mWC

Echo Canyon River Expeditions

6/4

Whitewater Rafting

AK

Lowe River

Fell out

48

F

 

http://rec-law.us/1Yemxbd

 

 

6/15

Whitewater Rafting

CO

Roaring Fork

Flip

50

M

Slaughterhouse section

http://rec-law.us/1WOcnyo

http://rec-law.us/1UkzCwI

Aspen Whitewater Rafting

6/15

Whitewater Rafting

AK

Kongakut River

Flip

69

F

 

http://rec-law.us/1UU3Ma6

http://rec-law.us/1UC2MZv

Alaska Alpine Adventures

6/15

Whitewater Rafting

AK

Kongakut River

Flip

67

F

 

http://rec-law.us/1UU3Ma6

http://rec-law.us/1UC2MZv

Alaska Alpine Adventures

If you would like a PDF of this chart please click here: 2016 Summer Commercial Fatalities

Our condolences go to the families of the deceased. Our thoughts extend to the families and staff at the areas who have to deal with these tragedies.

What do you think? Leave a comment.

If you like this let your friends know or post it on FB, Twitter or LinkedIn

Copyright 2016 Recreation Law (720) Edit Law

What do you think? Leave a comment.

clip_image002 

If you like this let your friends know or post it on FB, Twitter or LinkedIn

Author: Outdoor Recreation Insurance, Risk Management and Law

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Email: Rec-law@recreation-law.com

Google+: +Recreation

Twitter: RecreationLaw

Facebook: Rec.Law.Now

Facebook Page: Outdoor Recreation & Adventure Travel Law

Blog: www.recreation-law.com

Mobile Site: http://m.recreation-law.com

#AdventureTourism, #AdventureTravelLaw, #AdventureTravelLawyer, #AttorneyatLaw, #Backpacking, #BicyclingLaw, #Camps, #ChallengeCourse, #ChallengeCourseLaw, #ChallengeCourseLawyer, #CyclingLaw, #FitnessLaw, #FitnessLawyer, #Hiking, #HumanPowered, #HumanPoweredRecreation, #IceClimbing, #JamesHMoss, #JimMoss, #Law, #Mountaineering, #Negligence, #OutdoorLaw, #OutdoorRecreationLaw, #OutsideLaw, #OutsideLawyer, #RecLaw, #Rec-Law, #RecLawBlog, #Rec-LawBlog, #RecLawyer, #RecreationalLawyer, #RecreationLaw, #RecreationLawBlog, #RecreationLawcom, #Recreation-Lawcom, #Recreation-Law.com, #RiskManagement, #RockClimbing, #RockClimbingLawyer, #RopesCourse, #RopesCourseLawyer, #SkiAreas, #Skiing, #SkiLaw, #Snowboarding, #SummerCamp, #Tourism, #TravelLaw, #YouthCamps, #ZipLineLawyer, Fatality, Avalanche, Cat Skiing, Oregon, Whitewater Rafting,

 

 


States that do not Support the Use of a Release

The most changes in this form have occurred in the last year over the last ten years.

Assumption of the risk is your best defense in these states

These states do not allow a recreational business or program to use a release to stop litigation.

State

Citation

Issues/Article

Releases are Void

Louisiana

C.C. Art. 2004 (2005)

Any clause is null that, in advance, excludes or limits the liability of one party for intentional or gross fault that causes damage to the other party. Any clause is null that, in advance, excludes or limits the liability of one party for causing physical injury to the other party.

Montana

MCA § 27-1-701

Liability for negligence as well as willful acts. Except as otherwise provided by law, everyone is responsible not only for the results of his willful acts but also for an injury occasioned to another by his want of ordinary care or skill in the management of his property or person except so far as the latter has willfully or by want of ordinary care brought the injury upon himself.

Virginia

Johnson’s Adm’x v. Richmond and Danville R.R. Co., 86 Va. 975, 11 S.E. 829 (1890)

Except for Equine Activities Chapter 62.  Equine Activity Liability § 3.2-6202.  Liability limited; liability actions prohibited

Oregon

Bagley v. Mt. Bachelor, Inc., dba Mt. Bachelor Ski and Summer Resort, 2014 Ore. LEXIS 994

Oregon Supreme Court finds release signed at ski area is void as a violation of public policy.

Use of a Release is Restricted

Arizona

Phelps v. Firebird Raceway, Inc., 2005 Ariz. LEXIS 53

 

New Mexico

Berlangieri v. Running Elk Corporation, 132 N.M. 332;2002 NMCA 60;48

P.3d 70;2002 N.M. App. 39;41 N.M. St. B. Bull. 25

State created Equine Liability Statute so no need for release

West Virginia

Kyriazis v. University of West Virginia; 192 W. Va. 60; 450 S.E.2d 649;

1994 W. Va. LEXIS 161

 

Use of Releases is Probably Void

Connecticut

Hanks v. Powder Ridge Restaurant Corp., 276 Conn. 314, 885 A.2d 734 (2005) and Reardon v. Windswept Farm, LLC, Et Al., 280 Conn. 153; 905 A.2d 1156; 2006

Conn. LEXIS 330

 

Mississippi

Turnbough v. Ladner, 754 So. 2d 467; 1999 Miss. LEXIS 375

Mississippi Supreme Court makes it almost impossible to write a release that is enforceable because the court does not give direction as to what it wants.

Wisconsin

Atkins v. Swimwest Family Fitness Center, 2005 WI 4; 2005 Wisc. LEXIS 2

Wisconsin decision has left the status of release law in Wisconsin in jeopardy

Wisconsin

Roberts v. T.H.E. Insurance Company, et al., 2016 WI 20; 2016 Wisc. LEXIS 121

Wisconsin Supreme Court voids another release because it violates public policy. Public Policy as defined in Wisconsin requires the ability to bargain before signing the release.

Vermont

Dalury v. S-K-I, Ltd, 164 Vt 329; 670 A.2d 795; 1995 Vt. Lexis 127

 

Specific uses of Releases are Void

Alaska

Sec. 05.45.120(a).  Use of liability releases

A ski area operator may not require a skier to sign an agreement releasing the ski area operator from liability in exchange for the right to ride a ski area tramway and ski in the ski area. A release that violates this subsection is void and may not be enforced.

Hawaii

King v. CJM Country Stables, 315 F. Supp. 2d 1061, 2004 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 7511 (D. Haw. 2004)

Found that Hawaii statute § 663-1.54. Recreational activity liability prevented the use of a release

New York

General Obligation Law § 5-326. Agreements exempting pools, gymnasiums, places of public amusement or recreation and similar establishments from liability for negligence void and unenforceable

Every covenant, agreement or understanding in or in connection with, or collateral to, any contract, membership application, ticket of admission or similar writing, entered into between the owner or operator of any pool, gymnasium, place of amusement or recreation, or similar establishment and the user of such facilities, pursuant to which such owner or operator receives a fee or other compensation for the use of such facilities, which exempts the said owner or operator from liability for damages caused by or resulting from the negligence of the owner, operator or person in charge of such establishment, or their agents, servants or employees, shall be deemed to be void as against public policy and wholly unenforceable.

 

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If your product is not the cause of death or injury, it is a warranty issue.

Avalanche Probes do not cause suffocation.

The Consumer Products Safety Council (CPSC) has a lot more pull, power and weight now days. Mostly because the CPSC had its power to fine and the amount, it could fine increased. However, just because a product is not working right does not mean it is subject to a CPSC recall.

Here are the requirements for a recall according to the CPSC as found in its Recall Handbook.

(1) fails to comply with an applicable consumer product safety rule or with a voluntary consumer product safety standard upon which the Commission has relied under section 9, (2) fails to comply with any other rule, regulation, standard or ban under the CPSA or any other Act enforced by the Commission, including the Flammable Fabrics Act, 15 U.S.C. §1193-1204; the Federal Hazardous Substances Act, 15 U.S.C. § 1261-1278; the Children’s Gasoline Burn Prevention Act, 110 Public Law 278 (July 17, 2008), the Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act, 110 Public Law 140 (with amendments), the Poison Prevention Packaging Act, 15 U.S.C. § 1471-1476, and the Refrigerator Safety Act; 15 U.S.C. § 1211-1214; (3) contains a defect which could create a substantial product hazard, or (4) creates an unreasonable risk of serious injury or death.

The first three normally do not apply to outdoor recreation products.

The fourth one is the one most people manufacturing products in the outdoor industry must deal with “creates an unreasonable risk of serious injury or death.”

That means the product is the cause of the injury or death. There is a link between the use of the product by a consumer and the consumer’s injury or death.

At a website page, the CPSC defines the requirements for a recall slightly differently, but generally the rules are the same.

Duty to Report to CPSC: Rights and Responsibilities of Businesses

If you are a manufacturer, importer, distributor, and/or retailer of consumer products, you have a legal obligation to report the following types of information to the CPSC:

·         A defective product that could create a substantial risk of injury to consumers;

·         A product that creates an unreasonable risk of serious injury or death;

·         A product that fails to comply with an applicable consumer product safety rule or with any other rule, regulation, standard, or ban under the CPSA or any other statute enforced by the CPSC;

·         An incident in which a child (regardless of age) chokes on a marble, small ball, latex balloon, or other small part contained in a toy or game and that, as a result of the incident, the child dies, suffers serious injury, ceases breathing for any length of time, or is treated by a medical professional; and

·         Certain types of lawsuits. (This applies to manufacturers and importers only and is subject to the time periods detailed in Sec. 37 of the CPSA.)

Failure to fully and immediately report this information may lead to substantial civil or criminal penalties.  CPSC staff’s advice is “when in doubt, report.”

Again for the outdoor industry, the issue is, does your product create an unreasonable risk of serious injury or death. The key word is “create.”

Equipment used by friends or Search and Rescue to find you, after you are in a jam, injured or dead, cannot be the cause of your death. What you did prior to being found is what caused your death.

A bad example is recalling an avalanche probe.

Here is the CPSC website concerning an avalanche probe recall.

clip_image001clip_image002clip_image004

If you read the problem as defined under a hazard headline, this is what you find.

clip_image006

This can interfere with finding someone buried beneath the snow, posing a suffocation hazard.”

First, I do not believe that an avalanche probe can create a suffocation hazard. However, that seems to be what the website, as explained by the manufacturer, is saying.

Second, there a lot of ways of dying in an avalanche, suffocation is one of them and in the US, not necessarily the main reason for avalanche deaths.

Third of the probe to work properly, may make finding someone difficult or impossible. However, IT IS NOT THE CAUSE OF THEIR BURIAL. Failure of the avalanche probe to work is not the reason why the person is suffocating. Venturing out into avalanche terrain and triggering an avalanche is the reason why the person is injured or dying.

The avalanche probe did not create the serious risk of injury or death.

Why is this a problem?

1.     It places a burden on other manufacturers to do a recall when they are not needed. This is sort of like waking the sleeping giant. The CPSC now believes that avalanche rescue equipment should be recalled because it is the cause of the death.

2.     Lawsuits. You can purchase a software program that grabs the recall notices from the CPSC and posts them on your websites with the heading “have you been hurt by a ………………………….” These posts are found on plaintiff’s attorney’s websites. They are looking for people who have been injured by a recalled product because the lawsuit is easy. They have proof from the federal government the recall was defective. These never get to trial; they just get to the how much stage. The manufacturer’s response to the lawsuit is “how much should I write the check for….”

3.     Figure lawsuit triggers. Searches will be set up to find any reports of injuries or fatalities and avalanche probes. Every time the search finds an article like this, attorneys will dig, contact family members to see if there is money there.

If you want an example, remember the Formula 1 champion Michael Schumacher? He suffered a severe head injury skiing. One of the investigators looking at his helmet saw the GoPro mount and speculated the GoPro mounts changed the ability of the helmet to protect someone’s head. (See Michael Schumacher’s brain injury may be blamed on his GoPro.)

A month later, a law firm in the west sent out press releases looking for people who had injuries from wearing helmets with GoPro cameras attached. This press release was even reported by the industry by Sports One Source (subscription site) (See Law firm is going after GoPro for two different ways a video camera can allegedly lead to a fatality: the camera does not kill you, using the camera kills you????)

Avalanche probe manufacturers are going to write nuisance checks (or actually their insurance companies) to get stupid lawsuits to go away. You can win the lawsuit for $250,000, or you can get it to go away for $25,000. What do you think your insurance company is going to do?

 

Do Something

1.     If you have a product with a problem, figure out if it needs to be recalled before recalling it. A warranty issue is not a recall. If the product does not violate a rule regulation or industry standard, cannot be swallowed by a child or just needs fixed and does not injure or kill someone it probably does not need to be recalled.

2.     If your product is subject to a recall, based on your analysis, not the CPSC’s because the entire world should be recalled according to the CPSC, make sure the CPSC understands what your product does.  This is not easy. I’ve explained climbing gear, crampons, avalanche airbags, etc., to the CPSC, and honestly they do not understand. Ice in Washington DC is what you put in a drink, and snow is what allows you to stay home from work.

I’ve sent product to the CPSC to test that has come back in the same condition I sent it untested, unopened and unused. I’ve no found that sending links to online videos is more effective sometimes than sending product.

4.     If you must do a recall, get the language right on why your product is being recalled. It is your product and your recall being supervised by the CPSC. You need to work with the CPSC to get them to understand the issues, how the product is used and what the language must say. If you don’t you will create nightmares for yourself and the rest of the industry.

clip_image008What do you think? Leave a comment.

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By Recreation Law    Rec-law@recreation-law.com         James H. Moss

 

 

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2016 Commercial Fatalities

This list is not guaranteed to be accurate. The information is found from web searches and news dispatches. Those references are part of the chart. If you have a source for information on any fatality please leave a comment or contact me. Thank you.

If this information is incorrect or incomplete please let me know.  This is up to date as of May 5, 2016. Thanks.

Rafting, Mountaineering, Skiing out of bounds and other sports are probably still safer than your kitchen or bathroom. This information is not to scare you away from any activity but to help you understand the risks and to study.

Red is a probable death due to medical issues unrelated to the activity

Blue is an employee fatality

Dark blue is a death of an employee while working

Date

Activity

State

Location

What

Age

Sex

Location 2

Reference

 

Company

3/22

Cat Skiing

OR

Mt. Bailey

Avalanche, hit tree

 

M

 

http://rec-law.us/1XSFbT7

 

Cat Ski Mount Bailey

5/4

Whitewater Rafting

WA

Wenatchee River

Raft Flipped

53

M

Dryden

http://rec-law.us/1TuBuzC

 

Orion River

If you would like a PDF of this chart please click here.

Our condolences go to the families of the deceased. Our thoughts extend to the families and staff at the areas who have to deal with these tragedies.

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Copyright 2016 Recreation Law (720) Edit Law

What do you think? Leave a comment.

clip_image002 

If you like this let your friends know or post it on FB, Twitter or LinkedIn

Author: Outdoor Recreation Insurance, Risk Management and Law

To Purchase Go Here:

 

Email: Rec-law@recreation-law.com

Google+: +Recreation

Twitter: RecreationLaw

Facebook: Rec.Law.Now

Facebook Page: Outdoor Recreation & Adventure Travel Law

Blog: www.recreation-law.com

Mobile Site: http://m.recreation-law.com

#AdventureTourism, #AdventureTravelLaw, #AdventureTravelLawyer, #AttorneyatLaw, #Backpacking, #BicyclingLaw, #Camps, #ChallengeCourse, #ChallengeCourseLaw, #ChallengeCourseLawyer, #CyclingLaw, #FitnessLaw, #FitnessLawyer, #Hiking, #HumanPowered, #HumanPoweredRecreation, #IceClimbing, #JamesHMoss, #JimMoss, #Law, #Mountaineering, #Negligence, #OutdoorLaw, #OutdoorRecreationLaw, #OutsideLaw, #OutsideLawyer, #RecLaw, #Rec-Law, #RecLawBlog, #Rec-LawBlog, #RecLawyer, #RecreationalLawyer, #RecreationLaw, #RecreationLawBlog, #RecreationLawcom, #Recreation-Lawcom, #Recreation-Law.com, #RiskManagement, #RockClimbing, #RockClimbingLawyer, #RopesCourse, #RopesCourseLawyer, #SkiAreas, #Skiing, #SkiLaw, #Snowboarding, #SummerCamp, #Tourism, #TravelLaw, #YouthCamps, #ZipLineLawyer, Fatality, Avalanche, Cat Skiing, Oregon, Whitewater Rafting,