Get Your Comments in to Save the Gran Canyon from Development

 You only have until this Saturday, Sept 3 TODAY at 5:00 PM MT to help SAVE THE CONFLUENCE. Please SPEAK UP FOR GRAND CANYON!

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Photo by Jack Dykinga

You only have until this Saturday, Sept 3 at 5:00 PM MT to help SAVE THE CONFLUENCE. Please SPEAK UP FOR GRAND CANYON!

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Dear James,
CALLING ALL CANYON & RIVER ADVOCATES — The unthinkable has happened. Legislation has been submitted within the Navajo Nation for the Grand Canyon Escalade proposal (421 acres of development above the sacred confluence of the Little Colorado and Colorado Rivers, with a gondola/tramway that could bring 10,000 people down to river level PER DAY). If approved, this massive development would FOREVER CHANGE GRAND CANYON!EVERYONE should please submit comments and speak out against this terrible proposal before the deadline which is 5:00 PM this Saturday Sept. 3rd!! Please spread the word far and wide through email and social media! We need YOUR help!

1. READ THE LEGISLATIVE PROPOSAL AT http://www.navajonationcouncil.org/Legislations/2016/AUG/0293-16.pdf
2. SIGN THE PETITION AGAINST THIS PROPOSAL! The petition link can be found at www.savetheconfluence.com (and please encourage others to support and follow the STC Facebook page, sign up for email alerts, etc.)
3. COMMENT DIRECTLY TO THE NAVAJO NATION! You can email directly to comments or you can mail comments to: Executive Director Office of Legislative Services P.O. Box 3390 Window Rock, AZ 86515 (928) 871-7590. Comments may be made in the form of chapter resolutions, letters, position papers, etc. Please include your name, position title, address for written comments; a valid e-mail address is required. Anonymous comments will not be included in the Legislation packet.

***
The bottom line is:

This is GRAND CANYON – one of the seven NATURAL wonders of the world. If the Navajo Nation government approves this development, the integrity of values for which Grand Canyon was created will be severely compromised and degraded FOREVER.

The Little Colorado River corridor and its confluence with the Colorado River is culturally and spiritually significant to ALL of the affiliated tribes who hold Grand Canyon sacred.

A fragile, delicately balanced ecosystem is at stake. Proposed development raises serious questions about water, sewage, noise, impacts to endangered species (such as the humpback chub that spawn in the Little Colorado River), dark skies and wilderness values.

***
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Have YOU sent in your personal comments yet? You must do it by this Saturday, Sept 3 at 5:00 PM, MT! Please act NOW!

Please follow Save the Confluence on Facebook. Thank you to Lynn Hamilton of Grand Canyon River Guides for the text of this alert.

***
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Urgent Action Needed By 9/2 to Save the Confluence of the Little Colorado and the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon

CALLING ALL CANYON & RIVER ADVOCATES — The unthinkable has happened. Legislation has been submitted within the

Grand Canyon River Guides Association

Grand Canyon River Guides Association

Navajo Nation for the Grand Canyon Escalade proposal (421 acres of development above the sacred confluence of the Little Colorado and Colorado Rivers, with a gondola/tramway that could bring 10,000 people down to river level PER DAY). If approved, this massive development would FOREVER CHANGE GRAND CANYON!

EVERYONE should submit comments and speak out against this terrible proposal before the deadline which is 5:00 PM this Friday, Sept 2nd!! Please spread the word far and wide through email and social media! We need YOUR help!

1. READ THIS HORRIBLE LEGISLATIVE PROPOSAL AT http://www.navajonationcouncil.org/Legislations/2016/AUG/0293-16.pdf

2. SIGN THE PETITION AGAINST THIS PROPOSAL! The petition link can be found at www.savetheconfluence.com (and please encourage others to support and follow the STC Facebook page, sign up for email alerts, etc.)

3. COMMENT DIRECTLY TO THE NAVAJO NATION! You can email directly to comments or you can mail comments to: Executive Director Office of Legislative Services P.O. Box 3390 Window Rock, AZ 86515 (928) 871-7590. Comments may be made in the form of chapter resolutions, letters, position papers, etc. Please include your name, position title, address for written comments; a valid e-mail address is required. Anonymous comments will not be included in the Legislation packet.

For a 2 page summary of the proposed legislation: http://www.grandcanyontrust.org/sites/default/files/gc_Confluence_Partners_Escalade.pdf
For more information on what’s at stake: http://www.grandcanyontrust.org/stopping-grand-canyon-escalade
And also: http://savetheconfluence.com/news/proposed-grand-canyon-escalade-bill-starts-move/

The bottom line is:

· This is GRAND CANYON – one of the seven NATURAL wonders of the world. If the Navajo Nation government approves this development, the integrity of values for which Grand Canyon was created will be severely compromised and degraded FOREVER.

· The Little Colorado River corridor and its confluence with the Colorado River is culturally and spiritually significant to ALL of the affiliated tribes who hold Grand Canyon sacred.

· A fragile, delicately balanced ecosystem is at stake. Proposed development raises serious questions about water, sewage, noise, impacts to endangered species (such as the humpback chub that spawn in the Little Colorado River), dark skies and wilderness values.

Nothing less than the future of Grand Canyon is at stake. We support the tireless efforts of SAVE THE CONFLUENCE and all those who adamantly oppose this massive development. Grand Canyon River Guides’ mission statement states: “We will act whenever a canyon natural resource is threatened or the quality of the Grand Canyon experience is compromised.” STAND WITH US AND TAKE ACTION NOW!!! Canyon and river stewards unite!!

Lynn Hamilton
Executive Director
Grand Canyon River Guides


Arizona Voters Overwhelmingly Support Grand Canyon National Monument, New Poll Finds

http://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/news/arizona-voters-overwhelmingly-support-grand-canyon-national-monument-new-poll-finds-8071711

Arizona Voters Overwhelmingly Support Grand Canyon National Monument, New Poll Finds

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Sierralara/Shutterstock

Flying in the face of those who claim it would be unpopular to give the greater Grand Canyon watershed national monument status, a new nonpartisan poll finds that not only is there tremendous support for it but that it cuts across geographical and political lines.

“The results were overwhelming, and they demonstrated both strong and broad support [in] Arizona,” says Dave Metz of the research firm Fairbank, Maslin, Maullin, Metz & Associates, which polled hundreds of Arizona voters in January.

The pollsters discovered that 80 percent of Arizona voters support or strongly support the Grand Canyon National Heritage Monument, as outlined in a bill U.S. Congressman Raul Grijalva submitted to the U.S. House of Representatives last year.

Grijalva brought together a broad coalition of native tribes, environmental groups, and local stakeholders to design the bill, which if passed, would permanently protect 1.7 million acres of land and prevent any new uranium mines.

Courtesy of FM3

“More than half of Arizonans say more needs to be done to protect air, land, and water around the Grand Canyon, and they clearly see establishing that monument as an effective way of reaching that goal,” Metz says, adding that “the sentiment that the area around the Grand Canyon needs protection has grown over time.”

A similar poll conducted in 2009 found only 43 percent of people supported it, and a poll last year found that 73 percent of Arizonans support it.

Courtesy of Grand Canyon Trust

Local native tribes and environmental groups have talked about wanting national monument status for the Grand Canyon for years, and Grijalva’s efforts to make it a reality have solicited nothing short of a political firestorm among enemies of the bill.

Leading the charge is U.S. Congressman Paul Gosar, who has railed against the monument proposal for months. Gosar claims it would cost hundreds of jobs, destroy the local economy, and hinder sportsmen or other recreational users of the area.

U.S. Congressman Raul Grijalva

Courtesy of Raul Grijalva

In an interview earlier this year, Grijalva told New Times that Gosar’s “opposition is based on myths” and that he “needs to own up to the fact that he’s on the fringe of every public-land argument we have in this country.”

The benefit of this, Grijalva explained, helps “put the opposition of some in context with many . . . It’s important to deal with what the public wants and thinks, as opposed to letting this discussion be mired in half-truths, false information, and the sheer cry from opposition that doesn’t represent the vast majority of the people in Arizona.”

Both Metz and Grijalva say they were impressed by the broad appeal of the monument, as men and women across the state expressed support for the idea of national monuments in general and the Grand Canyon monument in particular.

According to the poll results, there is support for the Grand Canyon monument among:

  • 76 percent of men and 84 percent of women,
  • 65 percent of registered Republicans, 84 percent of independents, and 95 percent of Democrats,
  • 78 percent of people living in Congressional District 1, which is where the proposed monument would be,
  • 79 percent of white voters, 86 percent of Latino voters, and 87 percent of all voters of color, including Native Americans,
  • 81 percent of people living in urban areas, 83 percent in suburban areas, 79 percent in small towns, and 73 percent in rural areas,
  • And 76 percent of hunters and anglers.

Joe Jiang/Flickr

Unlike past polls, this most recent one also asked voters how their opinion of elected officials could be influenced by a vote for or against the monument:

“Voters were three times as likely to say they would support a politician who backed the establishment of the monument,” Metz says. “So not only do voters indicate that it’s a good idea, but they say that they’ll be more supportive of members of Congress who act to make the monument reality.”

Last year, Grijalva, along with Arizona U.S. Representatives Ann Kirkpatrick and Ruben Gallego, authored a public letter detailing their support for the monument. In the months since, however, Kirkpatrick has distanced herself from that stance, explaining that she’s still considering the statements of many local stakeholders.

But with public opinion clearly on his side, Grijalva says he’s ready to continue the fight: “As we go forward, we have strong support from the people in Arizona, the first nations most affected by this monument designation, [as well as] hunters and anglers and people that use our public land.

“I think we can start to put aside the shrill debate that occurs on this issue” and start taking “the steps to build  public support.”


A call for presentation proposals for the 2016 Grand Canyon History Symposium

A call for presentation proposals for the 2016 Grand Canyon History Symposium

An Official Centennial Event, as sanctioned by the National Park Service Centennial 2016 Committee!

The Grand Canyon Historical Society is pleased to announce the 4th Grand Canyon History Symposium, to be held on November 4-6, 2016. We encourage everyone who has done research on (or been a part of) Grand Canyon regional history to consider presenting. Proposals must be received by Tuesday, March 1, 2016.

Background

Since January 2002, there have been three history symposia, bringing together historians, witnesses to history, park employees, and others with a passion for Grand Canyon history. The presentations from each symposium were assembled into a collection of essays. It is the Grand Canyon Historical Society’s intent to publish the proceedings from this symposium as well.

National Park Service Focus

The 2016 Symposium will be unique in that there will only be 16 presentations with preference in selecting presentations given to those that tie Grand Canyon National Park to the National Park Service. Presentations concerning the history of the greater Grand Canyon and its adjacent areas within the Kaibab Plateau will also be considered.

After the 2016 Symposium, the one hundredth anniversary of Grand Canyon National Park will occur in 2019. It is anticipated that the 2019 Symposium will be a three day event with over 40 presentations. Candidates who are not chosen for the 2016 symposium will be encouraged to re-submit their proposals for the 2019 Symposium.

Submitting a Proposal

To be considered, please submit the following information by Tuesday, March 1, 2016:

__ Name __ Mailing address __ Phone number __ Email address

__ Presentation title with a 150-300 word abstract or summary of your presentation

__ Audio-visual requirements

__ Acknowledgement that, if selected, you agree to submit your complete PowerPoint presentation and up to 3,000 word presentation in essay form by Saturday, October 15, 2016

Send to:

Grand Canyon Historical Society or: Secretary

PO Box 31405

Flagstaff, AZ 86003-1405


High-Flows Part of Proposed 20-Year Glen Canyon Dam Management Plan

High-Flows Part of Proposed 20-Year Glen Canyon Dam Management Plan

By Ryan Heinsius 14 hours ago

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Federal officials have proposed a sweeping new plan to manage Glen Canyon Dam for the next two decades. They want to be more proactive in their efforts to restore fish and animal habitat as well as beaches that have degraded in the Grand Canyon since the dam became operational in the 1960s. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.

Glen Canyon Dam blocks nearly 90 percent of the sediment that historically ran through the Grand Canyon.

The U.S. Department of the Interior conducted three experiments in recent years to rebuild those areas on the Colorado River. Each time, the agency released millions of gallons of water from the dam over the course of several days to flush sediment through the canyon. It’s an attempt to mimic the river’s natural floods, and federal officials say the flows have been mostly successful.

Beverley Heffernan with the Bureau of Reclamation says the plan would continue those high flows annually for 20 years.

“The whole idea is that we constantly want to be trying to operate Glen Canyon Dam in a manner that continues to meet our water and power obligations, but also wherever we can, helps do an even better job of protecting and improving the resources downstream,” Heffernan says.

The Colorado River provides water for western agriculture and millions of households. Glen Canyon Dam generates enough power for about 425,000 homes every year.

Federal officials will hold public meetings for the proposal, and a comment period lasts until April.

http://knau.org/post/high-flows-part-proposed-20-year-glen-canyon-dam-management-plan#stream/0


National Park Service Seeks Public Input on a Backcountry Management Plan and Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Grand Canyon National Park

Grand Canyon News Release

National Park Service Seeks Public Input on a Backcountry Management Plan and Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Grand Canyon National Park

Grand Canyon, Ariz. – The National Park Service (NPS) announced today another opportunity for the public to weigh in on revisions to Grand Canyon National Park’s Backcountry Management Plan (BMP). The NPS began developing a Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for this plan in 2011 in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). More than 580 public comments were submitted during the initial phases of the development of this DEIS.

The purpose of the BMP is to establish an up-to-date plan that addresses contemporary backcountry issues and provides an adaptable framework and continues to allow the public to experience and preserve Grand Canyon’s unique backcountry and wilderness. Grand Canyon’s existing BMP was completed in 1988 and requires revisions to comply with current NPS laws and policies and the park’s 1995 General Management Plan. The park’s backcountry encompasses over 1.1 million acres, most of which are proposed for wilderness designation.

Available for review and comment, the BMP DEIS evaluates four alternatives–a no-action alternative and three action alternatives. The comment period for the DEIS will close 90 days after the Notice of Availability (NOA) is published in the Environmental Protection Agency’s Federal Register.

Public participation is an integral part of this planning process and will help ensure the plan’s success. To facilitate public participation, the NPS will host open house meetings as follows:

Tuesday, December 2, 2015

Grand Canyon Village, South Rim

Shrine of the Ages

From 4 to 6 pm

Monday, December 7, 2015

DoubleTree Hotel, 1175 W. Route 66

Flagstaff, AZ

From 4 to 7 pm

The NPS will also hold at least one webinar to reach the broadest range of stakeholders and interested public. Information about the webinar will be announced at a later date.

All interested parties may submit comments in person at one of the open house meetings; on the Planning, Environment, and Public Comment (PEPC) website; or via the US Postal Service.

The PEPC database is the preferred method for submitting comments and can be accessed at www.parkplanning.nps.gov/grca. Click on the “Backcountry Management Plan” or “Open for Comments” tab on the left-hand side of the toolbar and then select the EIS link.

Comments can also be mailed to: Superintendent, Grand Canyon National Park, Attn: Backcountry Management Plan, PO Box 129, Grand Canyon, AZ 86023.

More information about the Backcountry Management Plan and DEIS, public scoping, and public meetings will be posted on the PEPC site as it becomes available.


Has the National Park Service or the Grand Canyon National Park created a new “group” between commercial and private: noncommercial, organized group

 What has been casually used to define car groups has moved into the area of activities?

 The National Park Service, Grand Canyon National Park issued new regulations concerning running or hiking rim to rim or a rim to rim to rim. Rim to rim hike or run starts at either the North or South Rim, the person follows the trail to the floor of the canyon and then ascends back up to the other rim. A rim to rim to rim you start at one rim runs down and back up to the other rim and then turns around and run back. A rim to rim hike or run is 21 miles and has 4000 drop and gain in altitude.

 In Northern Arizona no matter what time of the year, this is a tough hike or run for one day.

 Of course, once something gets public attention everyone has to do it. (See Everest if you don’t believe this.) Now people are undertaking the feat without enough training, skill or knowledge putting stress on the already overburdened NPS staff and resources.

 It is for that reason that groups of people doing this now require a permit. The Permit information page is here if you are interested in taking a group of seven or more on one of these adventures.

 What caught my attention was the term used to describe these groups. “Noncommercial organized groups.” In the recent past the NPS has used this term to reduce or raise fees on groups visiting the park, mostly by car. This term was applied to church groups, school groups, etc. The term seems to be defined as “Groups and organizations that are non-commercial, and do not qualify for an educational fee waiver (churches, school clubs, scout groups, and other organizations)….” However, this is the first time I have seen it applied to anything other than entering the park.

 By this, I mean the NPS charges a different rate to groups as they come through the front gate. Consequently, the group is identified, fills out a permit and pays the fee as a group.

 Here the term has been applied to an activity in the park. Normally, activities are defined as private or commercial. Private are a group of people where no one makes money on the trip or is paid to be there. Commercial is somewhat defined where someone is making money (not necessarily a profit) or is being paid to go on the trip.

 Is this a new type of permit? Where is this going? Are we going to see it in the future (yes)?

 To Read the Grand Canyon NP article see: Grand Canyon Announces Interim Permits for Organized Groups Conducting Rim-to-Rim and Extended Day Hiking and Running

 To read an article on the issue see: R2R Permits Required at Grand Canyon

 What do you think? Leave a comment.

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