Utah Court reaches to find a boat renter liable when a boat sinks on Lake Powell due to high winds

The Federal District Court found the boat rental operation was negligent to defeat damages defenses provided by admiralty law. Causation, the relationship between what the defendant did and the accident giving rise to the claim seems to be stretched in this case.

In re Aramark Sports and Entertainment Services, LLC, 2014 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 121565

State: Utah, United States District Court for the District of Utah, Central Division

Defendant: In re Aramark Sports and Entertainment Services, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, as owner of a certain 20′ 2007 Baja Islander 202 for exoneration from or limitation of liability

Plaintiff Claims: Negligence

Defendant Defenses: Limitation of Liability Act, 46 U.S.C. §§ 30501-30512

Holding: for the Plaintiff

Year: 2014

This case is a little out of the unusual for me because it concerns a powerboat. However, the legal issues could apply to any boat; whitewater raft, sea kayak, kayak or whatever. More importantly, it could affect canoe liveries or boat rentals if the decision is accepted by other courts.

One way of defending against claims due to boating accidents is by using federal law. If a river or body of water is determined to be navigable as defined under federal law, then a defendant can use a federal statute and admiralty law to limit any possible claims. The reason you would want to do this is the maximum that can be recovered against someone using this section of admiralty law, is the value of the vessel after the accident plus the value of the cargo. So most cases, when there has been a catastrophic loss the value of the raft zero, as the boat is destroyed or sunk. Even a raft that is recovered with all of its gear would still be limited to $10 to $20,000.00 in value.

The first issue you have to overcome when using admiralty law limits is to establish jurisdiction. The body of water or river has to qualify as being a navigable river under a specific section of the law. The problem is there are 17 different definitions of navigable under federal law, plus who knows how many more under state law. You must apply the correct definition of navigable to the case.

In this case, the accident occurred on Lake Powell. Because Lake Powell spans two states and is used for commercial traffic it was declared to be navigable under the law.

The basis for this claim is three couples rented a boat from the concessionaire at the marina. Eventually, the boat sank with four of them drowning. The winds picked up and exceeded the maximum wind speed the boat should have been operated at. The defendant filed this action in federal court claiming the value the vessel after the accident was zero and therefore, there was no recovery available to the plaintiffs. The court disagreed.

The boat that sunk was only rated to be workable at wind speeds of 31 miles an hour or less. At 31 miles an hour the boat manual stated the driver should have had a lot of boating skills. The boat was also not positively buoyant; meeting that if the boat filled with water, it would sink and would not stay on the surface. There was also no law or requirement that the boat be buoyant.

One of the main issues facing the defendant in this case was they normally handed out a weather report both at the time of the rental of the boat and the time the boat left the dock. The plaintiffs received a weather report when they completed the paperwork but not in the day they left. However, they did leave the docks a half-hour earlier than when the rental operations normally open.

One risk of using admiralty law to avoid liability in a boating accident is admiralty law does not allow the defendant to use a release. I suspect that a release might’ve been used in this case because the paperwork and renting a boat usually go hand in hand.

The plaintiffs were three couples from Florida, who came to Arizona to vacation. They rented a boat from the marina the intention of going up to see natural bridges and coming back on the same day. They rented the boat before the day they left on their trip. That day they received a weather forecast from the boat rental agent. The forecast changed in the middle of the night and when they picked up the boat, they did not receive a new forecast. On the way back from visiting the Natural Bridges Arch they had to stop at another marina to refill. After leaving that marina they went out into the Lake Powell and on the way back the boat sunk due to high winds.

Analysis: making sense of the law based on these facts.

One of the first main issues the court looked at was who could determine if boat rentals should stop because of the weather. Several employees of the defendant testified that wind speeds from 25 to 30 miles an hour, boat rentals were stopped. However, there was no written policy on when boat rentals were stopped and each employee answered with a slightly different answer. More importantly nothing in the transcript indicated that there is any reliable way to determine what the weather forecast was for the wind speed was at the rental operations.

A sub argument of this was not reviewed by the court or raised by the defendant was, whether or not there was a duty on the part of the rental operation to contact the other marina and warn the people not to go back out on the lake. No phone call was made by the rental operation to the other marina.

This argument was futile though because the only way to contact the boat drivers before, or after they left the second marina was by radio. The plaintiff’s never turned the radio turned on.

Ms. Ambrosius did not attempt to call Dangling Rope Marina to have personnel there warn the Prescott Party of the high winds although she knew that the Prescott Party would stop there to refuel. She did not notify any of the tour captains to watch for Boat 647 and alert them of the danger. She did not attempt to call the Prescott Party on the marine radio. (Although that would have been futile because Mr. Brady did not turn on Boat 647’s radio.) In sum, the court finds that Ms. Ambrosius did nothing to locate Boat 647.

The federal statute that the defendant relied upon was the Limitation of Liability Act, 40 6U. S. §§ 30501 – 30512. This statute provides exoneration of liability for the boat owner up to the value of the vessel and freight after the accident. There is an exception to the rule if there is knowledge or is in the law states privity with the owner of the vessel to the possibility of the damage.

The Act does, however, create an exception to that general rule by defining “claim, debt, or liability”: “claims, debts, and liabilities subject to limitation under subsection (a) are those arising from any embezzlement, loss, or destruction of any property, goods, or merchandise shipped or put on board the vessel, any loss, damages, or injury by collision, or any act, matter, or thing, loss, damage, or forfeiture, done, occasioned, or incurred, without the privity or knowledge of the owner.”

It is this knowledge or privity that allows the plaintiff to argue that the plaintiff defendant could have stopped them and save their lives.

Admiralty law was created for the transportation of goods and people across the oceans. It was adopted as uniform laws among countries with interests in shipping. As such, many parts of admiralty law make more sense when viewed in this light a boat on the high seas.

There’s a two-step inquiry to determine whether the act shall apply based on the privity or knowledge of the owner of the boat.

Courts use a two-step inquiry to determine whether a petitioner is entitled to exoneration or limitation of liability when sued for negligence. “First, the court must determine what acts of negligence . . . caused the accident. Second, the court must determine whether the shipowner had knowledge [of] or privity [with the person who committed] those same acts of negligence . . . The claimant bears the burden of proving negligence and if successful, the burden shifts to the shipowner to prove lack of knowledge or privity.

In this case, the court held that negligence on the land is similar to negligence in the water. The plaintiffs had to prove that there was a connection between the defendant’s conduct and the plaintiff’s injury.

Torts occurring on navigable waters are governed by maritime law. “The elements of a maritime negligence cause of action are essentially the same as land-based negligence under the common law.” A claimant must prove “a duty owed by the defendant to the plaintiff, breach of that duty, injury sustained by [the] plaintiff, and a causal connection between [the] defendant’s conduct and the plain-tiff’s injury.”

The ship owner owes a duty of reasonable care to all passengers on his ship. Or, in this case, the court held the rental operation owes a duty of reasonable care to the people renting his boat.

“Under Maritime law, a plaintiff is owed a duty of ordinary care under the circumstances.” “We hold that the owner of a ship in navigable waters owes to all who are on board for purposes not inimical to his legitimate interests the duty of exercising reasonable care under the circumstances of each case.”

The court found that the defendant breached his duty of reasonable care when it allowed plaintiffs to leave the morning of the accident. “Here, the court concludes that Aramark breached its duty of reasonable care when it allowed the Prescott Party to leave the morning of April 25, 2009.”

This conclusion was reached because the defendant had a duty to warn the renters of the weather issues. This is where this case takes on some concerns that exceed those of the normal rental situation. Hertz never gives your weather forecast when you leave its rental operation with their car.

I suspect that duty was created by the defendant normally providing all renters of its boats with a copy of the weather forecast because that was not done, then it created a duty.

Aramark, primarily Ms. Ambrosius, had a duty to be advised of the current weather forecasts and wind advisories before allowing any party to leave the marina in an Aramark power boat. This is particularly true because, as Aramark knew, in the spring, the weather changed constantly. Phyllis Coon testified that in the spring, shutting down rentals was considered almost on “an hourly basis” because of the erratic weather. And “[s]pringtime is al-ways windy on the lake.”

The second issue the court found or had an issue with, was the boat owner’s manual cautioned that when the winds exceeded 31 miles an hour, the boat should not be driven. Aramark’s only requirement when renting a boat was to make sure that the person was 18 years or older and had a valid driver’s license. Again, the same requirements to rent a car as Hertz used. The court held that a person’s prior ability and experience were important.

The boat owner’s manual cautioned that when wind speeds reached 31 miles an hour, only experienced operators might be able to safely operate the boat. Yet Aramark rented to anyone eighteen years or older, with a valid driver’s license, without regard to that person’s previous boating experience.

All these facts allow the court to conclude that Aramark could possibly be negligent.

The court, when it considers these facts, concludes that Aramark had frequently in the past recognized that high winds could be dangerous to boaters. Aramark should have been aware, if it was not, that high winds were forecast for April 25, 2009. And it was foreseeable to Aramark that if those who had rented Baja 202 Islanders for a trip on Lake Powell the morning of April 25, 2009, were allowed to depart, the boats could sink because of the high winds. It was further foreseeable to Aramark that if the boats sank, particularly in the cold April water, the passengers could suffer injury and even death. Aramark breached that duty when it allowed the Prescott Party to leave.

The next issue is whether or not breach of the duty of the boat renter/defendant was the cause of the injury. Here the court found that by allowing the boating party to leave the other marina that was a factor in the sinking of the boat. “Here, the court concludes that Aramark’s failure to stop the Prescott Party from leaving was a substantial factor in the sinking of Boat 647 and the resulting harm.”

(Which begs the questions, how were you going to stop someone from leaving a marina when their car and lodging were at their destination?)

Both marinas were owned and operated by the same defendant.

The final issue the court was, whether or not there was privity between the defendant and what happened. Privity in admiralty law is a weird definition of the word. In this case, the defendant must prove that they did not have any knowledge of the negligence. Normally, this would make sense when the owner of the boat is sitting on shore thousands of miles away and the captain or a member of the crew does something that was negligent causing the sinking of the boat.

In this case because the boat was a rental and owned by a defendant Corporation the court held all the employees had a duty or had privity to the negligent acts. “When a corporation owns the vessel, the test is whether culpable participation or neglect of duty can be attributed to an officer, managing agent, supervisor, or other high-level employee of the corporation.”

Because the general manager and several employees of the defendant could stop the rental, the court said the discretionary authority to close the boat rentals, was held to have been a negligent act.

Finding this the court held that Aramark could not exonerate or limit its liability in this case. The case would then proceed to trial for the full amount of damages claimed by the plaintiffs. This decision is not a finding of negligence against the defendant only that there was enough negligent for the court to conclude Aramark could be liable.

So Now What?

Here’s a situation whereby trying to be good and help people renting your boats you created your own liability.

The experience of the person running the boat also creates its own nightmares as you well know someone is going to lie to you when they fill out a form asking for experience. The will tell you they have plenty experience when want to rent a boat. The experience issue is a nightmare.  no way you can test someone’s experience or trust them. If they say they can rent a boat, and it sinks, the rental operation is liable for not testing them. If they don’t test now, they are liable.

All six people were from Florida, which is surrounded by water and has thousands of boat able canals, rivers and lakes, and only one person of the six had any boating experience.

The causation issue is another issue that is disturbing. Normally, causation is defined as a closer or more direct relationship between what the defendant does in creating the injury of the plaintiff. Here causation was found by allowing them to leave the marina.

However, that was not the cause of the sinking of the boat. The boat sunk because it was driven improperly in high winds. However, the court then came back and said earlier, that because they didn’t check the boating experience and didn’t hand out the weather report that was also part of the accident. The court created circuitous routes to get to the fact that they wanted the defendant liable in this case.

It is disturbing when it can quickly become a nightmare for any program or business in attempting to help the people coming to its business. Probably in the future the weather forecasts will be in a stack on the desk with a little sign that says weather forecasts take one if you want one. There will be a sign that says the boat should not be operated if the wind speed is above XX miles an hour and there will be a wind gauge nearby.

None of which will do anything save anyone’s life. Boats are rented for weeks and the weather changes. The wind in on a cove could be calm, and you hit the open part of the lake, and the wind is catastrophic. The information you obtained earlier, a day or a week will have no value where you are when trouble starts.

Besides, how many people can effectively guess the wind speed?

I think another issue here, but not written in the opinion is the boat operation’s manual had a specific wind speed where the boat should not be used. Consequently, since the manufacturer suggested the boat not be used at that speed, probably the court thought the rental operation should not rent boats when speeds exceeded the manufacturer’s recommendations.

I also suspect that some type of wind meter will be installed on the marina property so that the rental people can look at the wind and see if it should be rented. But again then who has the ability to make that call to the wind meter when the person rents the boat says the winds find, but by the time they go back to the car get their items they want to take with them and walk out the winds kicked up does the 18-year-old summer intern holding the boat for the people as they enter it have the ability to say hey it’s too windy can’t go. How’s he going to know at the end of the dock? In the future, more people may become injured because they didn’t pick up a weather forecast and didn’t understand what they’re getting into because nobody the defendant is going to stick their neck that is to tell them.

In the past rental, operations have had no liability once the equipment rented leaves the renter’s operation.

If you are interested in having me write your release, fill out this Information Form and Contract and send it to me.

What do you think? Leave a comment.

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Author: Outdoor Recreation Insurance, Risk Management and Law

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Copyright 2017 Recreation Law (720) Edit Law

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By Recreation Law           Rec-law@recreation-law.com     James H. Moss

#AdventureTourism, #AdventureTravelLaw, #AdventureTravelLawyer, #AttorneyatLaw, #Backpacking, #BicyclingLaw, #Camps, #ChallengeCourse, #ChallengeCourseLaw, #ChallengeCourseLawyer, #CyclingLaw, #FitnessLaw, #FitnessLawyer, #Hiking, #HumanPowered, #HumanPoweredRecreation, #IceClimbing, #JamesHMoss, #JimMoss, #Law, #Mountaineering, #Negligence, #OutdoorLaw, #OutdoorRecreationLaw, #OutsideLaw, #OutsideLawyer, #RecLaw, #Rec-Law, #RecLawBlog, #Rec-LawBlog, #RecLawyer, #RecreationalLawyer, #RecreationLaw, #RecreationLawBlog, #RecreationLawcom, #Recreation-Lawcom, #Recreation-Law.com, #RiskManagement, #RockClimbing, #RockClimbingLawyer, #RopesCourse, #RopesCourseLawyer, #SkiAreas, #Skiing, #SkiLaw, #Snowboarding, #SummerCamp, #Tourism, #TravelLaw, #YouthCamps, #ZipLineLawyer, Lake Powell, Aramark, Boat Rental, Wind, Weather Forecast, Privity, Admiralty Law, Admiralty and Maritime Law, Pre-Departure Briefing, Causation,

 

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Montreat College Virtuoso Series 2 Day Risk Outdoor Recreation Management, Insurance & Law Program

2 Days packed with information you can put to use immediately. Information compiled from 30 years in court and 45 years in the field.

Day 1 February 24, 2017: Assumption of the Risk (legalese for educating your clients)

            What paperwork works to keep you out of court and what paperwork sends you to court.

Day 2 February 25, 2017:  Risk Management Plans & How to deal with an incident

You’ll also receive a copy of my new book Outdoor Recreation Insurance, Risk Management, and Law

Curriculum

1.    Assumption of the Risk

1.1. Still a valid defense in all states

1.2. Defense for claims by minors in all states

1.3. Proof of your guests assuming the risk is the tough part.

1.3.1.   Paperwork proves what they know

1.3.1.1.       Applications

1.3.1.2.       Releases

1.3.1.3.       Brochures

1.3.2.   The best education is from your website

1.3.2.1.       Words

1.3.2.2.       Pictures

1.3.2.3.       Videos

2.    Releases

2.1. Where they work

2.1.1.   Where they work for kids

2.2. Why they work

2.2.1.   Contract

2.2.2.   Exculpatory Clause

2.2.3.   Necessary Language

2.2.4.   What kills Releases

2.2.4.1.       Jurisdiction & Venue

2.2.4.2.       Assumption of the Risk

2.2.4.3.       Negligence Per Se

2.2.4.4.        

3.    Risk Management Plans

3.1. Why yours won’t work

3.2. Why they come back and prove your negligence in court

3.2.1.   Or at least make you look incompetent

3.3. What is needed in a risk management plan

3.3.1.   How do you structure and create a plan

3.3.2.   Top down writing or bottom up.

3.3.2.1.       Goal is what the front line employee knows and can do

4.    Dealing with an Incident

4.1. Why people sue

4.2. What you can do to control this

4.2.1.   Integration of pre-trip education

4.2.2.   Post Incident help

4.2.3.   Post Incident communication

Put the date on your calendar now: February 24 and 25th 2017 at Montreat College, Montreat, NC 28757

$399 for both days and the book!

For more information contact Jim Moss rec.law@recreation.law.com

 

To register contact John Rogers, Montreat College Team and Leadership Center Director, jrogers@montreat.edu (828) 669- 8012 ext. 2761

 

Download this Press Release here: pr-1

 


Summer 2016 Commercial Fatalities

This list is not guaranteed to be accurate. The information is found from web searches and news dispatches. Those references are part of the chart. If you have a source for information on any fatality please leave a comment or contact me. Thank you.

If this information is incorrect or incomplete please let me know.  This is up to date as of December 1, 2016. Thanks.

Rafting, Mountaineering, Skiing out of bounds and other sports are probably still safer than your kitchen or bathroom. This information is not to scare you away from any activity but to help you understand the risks and to study.

Red is a probable death due to medical issues unrelated to the activity

Blue is an employee fatality

Dark blue is a death of an employee while working

Date

Activity

State

Location

What

Age

Sex

Location 2

Reference

Ref 2

Company

3/22

Cat Skiing

OR

Mt. Bailey

Avalanche hit tree

 

M

 

http://rec-law.us/1XSFbT7

 

Cat Ski Mount Bailey

5/4

Whitewater Rafting

WA

Wenatchee River

Raft Flipped

53

M

Dryden

http://rec-law.us/1TuBuzC

 

Orion River

 

Whitewater Rafting

ME

Dead River

Fell out

52

M

 

http://rec-law.us/22B3zeY

http://rec-law.us/1U0HrbU

North Country Rivers

5/22

Whitewater Rafting

CO

Arkansas River

Fell out

61

F

Parkdale

http://rec-law.us/1r4zOp3

http://rec-law.us/1O75mWC

Echo Canyon River Expeditions

6/4

Whitewater Rafting

AK

Lowe River

Fell out

48

F

 

http://rec-law.us/1Yemxbd

 

 

6/15

Whitewater Rafting

CO

Roaring Fork

Flip

50

M

Slaughterhouse section

http://rec-law.us/1WOcnyo

http://rec-law.us/1UkzCwI

Aspen Whitewater Rafting

6/15

Whitewater Rafting

AK

Kongakut River

Flip

69

F

 

http://rec-law.us/1UU3Ma6

http://rec-law.us/1UC2MZv

Alaska Alpine Adventures

6/15

Whitewater Rafting

AK

Kongakut River

Flip

67

F

 

http://rec-law.us/1UU3Ma6

http://rec-law.us/1UC2MZv

Alaska Alpine Adventures

6/22

Sea Kayaking

ME

Downeast Maine

High Seas

63

M

Corea Harbor

http://rec-law.us/28RNpuw

 

SeaScape Kayaks

6/22

Sea Kayaking

ME

Downeast Maine

High Seas

 

M

Corea Harbor

http://rec-law.us/28RNpuw

 

SeaScape Kayaks

6/24/16

Whitewater Rafting

CO

Green River

 

63

F

Disaster Falls

http://rec-law.us/295dJ7a

http://rec-law.us/290uTwS

Adrift Adventures

7/2/16

Whitewater Rafting

CO

Arkansas River

Fell out

51

F

Zoom Flume

http://rec-law.us/29h5oxj

http://rec-law.us/29hYin3

River Runners

7/17

Inflatable Kayak

OR

Rogue River

Fell out & trapped unwater

57

M

Wildcat Rapid

http://rec-law.us/2a9iiKF

 

 

7/21

Canoe Trip

MN

Boundary Waters

Lighting Strike

39

F

Basswood Lake

http://rec-law.us/29X5ve3

http://rec-law.us/2a1jHUx

BSA Northern Tier High Adventure Base

7/21

Canoe Trip

MN

Boundary Waters

Lighting Strike

13

M

Basswood Lake

http://rec-law.us/29X5ve3

http://rec-law.us/2a1jHUx

BSA Northern Tier High Adventure Base

7/23

Mountain Climbing

WY

Grand Teton National Park

Fell

42

M

Valhalla Canyon near the Black Ice Coulier

http://rec-law.us/2a88grE

http://rec-law.us/2as4s9f

Exum

9/12

Whitewater Rafting

AZ

Grand Canyon NP

Guide walked out of camp with inflatable

34

M

Pancho’s Kitchen

http://rec-law.us/2cIc9JI

 

OARS

If you would like a PDF of this chart please click here.

Our condolences go to the families of the deceased. Our thoughts extend to the families and staff at the areas who have to deal with these tragedies.

What do you think? Leave a comment.

If you like this let your friends know or post it on FB, Twitter or LinkedIn

Copyright 2016 Recreation Law (720) Edit Law

What do you think? Leave a comment.

 

If you like this let your friends know or post it on FB, Twitter or LinkedIn

Author: Outdoor Recreation Insurance, Risk Management and Lawclip_image002_thumb.jpg

To Purchase Go Here:

 

Email: Rec-law@recreation-law.com

Google+: +Recreation

Twitter: RecreationLaw

Facebook: Rec.Law.Now

Facebook Page: Outdoor Recreation & Adventure Travel Law

Blog: www.recreation-law.com

Mobile Site: http://m.recreation-law.com

#AdventureTourism, #AdventureTravelLaw, #AdventureTravelLawyer, #AttorneyatLaw, #Backpacking, #BicyclingLaw, #Camps, #ChallengeCourse, #ChallengeCourseLaw, #ChallengeCourseLawyer, #CyclingLaw, #FitnessLaw, #FitnessLawyer, #Hiking, #HumanPowered, #HumanPoweredRecreation, #IceClimbing, #JamesHMoss, #JimMoss, #Law, #Mountaineering, #Negligence, #OutdoorLaw, #OutdoorRecreationLaw, #OutsideLaw, #OutsideLawyer, #RecLaw, #Rec-Law, #RecLawBlog, #Rec-LawBlog, #RecLawyer, #RecreationalLawyer, #RecreationLaw, #RecreationLawBlog, #RecreationLawcom, #Recreation-Lawcom, #Recreation-Law.com, #RiskManagement, #RockClimbing, #RockClimbingLawyer, #RopesCourse, #RopesCourseLawyer, #SkiAreas, #Skiing, #SkiLaw, #Snowboarding, #SummerCamp, #Tourism, #TravelLaw, #YouthCamps, #ZipLineLawyer, Fatality, Avalanche, Cat Skiing, Oregon, Whitewater Rafting,

 

 


Summer 2015 Commercial Fatalities

This list is not guaranteed to be accurate. The information is found from web searches and news dispatches. Those references are part of the chart. If you have a source for information on any fatality please leave a comment or contact me. Thank you.

If this information is incorrect or incomplete please let me know.  This is up to date as of December 31, 2015. Thanks.

Rafting, Mountaineering and other summer sports are probably still safer than your kitchen or bathroom. This information is not to scare you away from any activity but to help you understand the risks and to study.

Red is a probable death due to medical issues unrelated to the activity

Dark blue is a death of an employee while working

Date

Activity

State

Location

What

Age

Sex

Location 2

Reference

 

Company

3/2

Backcountry Skiing

AK

Chugach Mountains

Calving Glacier

28

M

 

http://rec-law.us/1CpcDtI

 

Chugach Powder Guides

5/22

Whitewater Rafting

CO

Clear Creek

Raft Flipped

47

F

M258.5

rec-law.us/1I3HWx7

 

All American Adventures

5/31

Whitewater Rafting

MT

Gallatin River

Raft Flipped

43

M

House Rock

rec-law.us/1GhQpwm

 

Geyser Whitewater Expedition

6/5

Whitewater Rafting

UT

Colorado River, Westwater

Raft Flipped

50

M

Funnel Falls

rec-law.us/1HduOnS

 

 

6/10

Whitewater Rafting

CO

Arkansas River, Brown’s Canyon,

Raft high sided

11

M

Big Drop

rec-law.us/1GwG51X

 

The Adventure Company

6/11

Zip Line

NC

Camp Cheerio

 

12

F

 

rec-law.us/1FdpyKX

 

YMCA

 

Whitewater Rafting

CO

Arkansas River

 

52

M

Salt Lick

rec-law.us/1KRwN2b

 

 

 

Whitewater Rafting

CO

Animas

 

 

M

 

 

 

Mild to Wild

6/13

Whitewater Rafting

CO

Roaring Fork River

 

44

F

 

rec-law.us/1OgnuIj

rec-law.us/1Kfi2aH

Blazing Adventures

6/22

Hiking on Whitewater Rafting Trip

AZ

Colorado River

Missing after hike

22

M

Pumpkin Springs, Swamper on trip

rec-law.us/1efzCNB

rec-law.us/1VspmmX

Tours West

6/23

Wakeboarding

GA

Carters Lake

 

23

M

 

rec-law.us/1e3wdBF

 

Cohutta Springs Youth Camp

 

Whitewater Rafting

NM

Rio Grande

 

52

M

 

rec-law.us/1LDliwP

 

 

7/4

Whitewater Rafting

CO

Clear Creek

 

20

M

 

rec-law.us/1LWmk7l

 

Mile High Rafting

7/6

Whitewater Rafting

CO

Poudre River

Medical

76

M

 

rec-law.us/1NPBLeT

rec-law.us/1HQm6M7

A1 Wildwater Rafting

7/13

Ropes Course

SC

Freebird

 

16

F

 

rec-law.us/1OdEFep

 

Carolina Point Young Life Camp

7/14

Zip Line

UT

Zip line

Fell off platform

54

M

Grabbed guest who pulled him off

rec-law.us/1CE8fIS

 

Kanab Zipline

7/18

Whitewater Rafting

CO

Dizzy Lizzy

Fell out of raft

35

M

 

rec-law.us/1LkODwd

 

 

9/25/15

Zip Line

MI

Huron County

Fell from zip line

85

M

 

rec-law.us/1R93WYF

 

Bay Shore Camp

9/27

Cycling Time Trial

CA

Yolo County

Hit by car

57

M

County Road 19, west of Interstate 505 near Esparto

rec-law.us/1L1om4S

 

Northern California Nevada Cycling Association

If you are unable to read the chart, you can download a copy of this as a PDF here.

Our condolences go to the families of the deceased. Our thoughts extend to the families and staff at the areas who have to deal with these tragedies.

What do you think? Leave a comment.

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Are you a Guide? Great a Great Story to Tell?

My name is Chris Solomon, and I need your very best guide story.

Let me explain:

I’m a contributing editor at Outside magazine, based up in Seattle, and I’m also a frequent writer for the New York Times, Scientific American, Runner’s World and other rags.

Outside has asked me to tackle a large story for spring tentatively entitled, ‘The tales guides tell.’ I’ve had the good fortune to spend some time with guides over the years—both while on assignment and because I have guides who are friends. I know that they have really interesting stories to tell. Simply put, we want to capture the very best of the tales that guides tell each other over beers back at the bar, once their clients have all gone home.

To that end, I’m looking for the hilarious stories. The absurd stories. The X-rated stories. The truly surreal and/or bizarre stories. The heartbreaking tales and maybe even sometimes the tragic stories. I’m not looking for a sort-of entertaining story, I’m looking for the absolute one tale you’ve got that sticks with you above all the others.

I don’t need to tell you that guides—whether fishing- , canoe- , rafting-, mountain-, ski- guides—are the essence of outdoor culture. You are out there more than any of us, dealing not only with Mother Nature, but you’re also out there dealing with true wildlife—which is to say, other human beings.

We want to collect perhaps a dozen or more of the best stories into a large package for a spring issue; they’ll range from small (a few sentences) to large (perhaps 1,500 words), and told in guides’ own words as much as possible… so you’d have a chance to go over the story with me and make sure it sounds right to you.

This idea will only work if I find truly top-shelf anecdotes, though. So I need the VERY BEST that are out there.

And to be clear: My goal is not to embarrass others. I can grant anonymity to clients. I don’t necessarily need to mention employers. I don’t always need to mention who you are—though I do hope to have many of these stories attributed, lest readers think I invented them. In short, if you’ve got an amazing story but your worry is being identified, let’s talk. We can figure something out.

I DON’T need you to write out the whole story! Just give me a sense of what the story is, and why it is so great or compelling. And we could then talk about it over the phone and I can do all the typing/transcribing of your story! Less work for you!

OR, do you know a guide who’s got the best story you’ve ever heard? Tell me who he/she is, and tell me how to reach him. Or put the guide in touch with me: solochris

Thanks so much. Please reply to me in the next few days with maybe just a line or two about your story—and when I could call you to talk about it and jot it down in more detail.

Thanks so much. I really appreciate your help in making this a collection that will even surprise guides with how entertaining and interesting it is.

Thanks so much for your help.

Best,
Chris Solomon

Seattle

solochris

347-556-6364 cell


Commercial Summer Fatalities: 2014

Our condolences to the families of the deceased.

This list is not guaranteed to be accurate. The information is found from web searches and news dispatches. If you have a source for information on any fatality please leave a comment.

Whitewater fatalities are light blue

Medical fatalities are light red

This is up to date as of September 14, 2014

If this information is incorrect or incomplete please let me know. Thank You.

Date

State

Activity

Where

How

Outfitter or Guide Service

Sex

Home

Age

Source

Source

5/28

AZ

Whitewater Kayaking

Colorado River, Grand Canyon, Badger Rapid

Did not right his kayak

 

M

 

43

http://rec-law.us/SVpdfb

 

6/3

AZ

Whitewater Rafting

Colorado River, Grand Canyon

Allergic reaction

 

F

Seattle, WA

54

http://rec-law.us/1l4xk4K

 

6/7

CO

Whitewater Rafting

Clear Creek

Fell out of raft, possible respirator problems

 

M

Brighton, CO

41

http://rec-law.us/1uEp3Fc

http://rec-law.us/1rafOwq

6/10

CO

Whitewater Rafting

Arkansas River, Salt Lick

boat flipped or dump trucked

Royal Gorge Rafting

M

Enid, OK

48

http://rec-law.us/1spBsRI

http://rec-law.us/1niITC2

6/14

CO

Whitewater Rafting

Arkansas River, Royal Gorge

respiratory problems before he and five other rafters were tossed out

 

M

Colorado Springs, CO

44

http://rec-law.us/1nl63ZF

http://rec-law.us/1lXMEAj

6/16

CO

Whitewater Rafting

Roaring Fork river

Fell out of raft

Blazing Adventures

M

Denver, CO

44

http://rec-law.us/1lB7jey

 

6/27

ID

Whitewater Rafting

Salmon River, The Slide

Ejected from raft

Epley’s Whitewater Adventure

M

Poulsbo, WA

50

http://rec-law.us/1x79IAj

http://rec-law.us/1qPcLds

7/15

WY

Mountaineering

Grand Teton

Fell

Jackson Hole Mountain Guides

F

Edmond, OK

43

http://rec-law.us/1spEHaK

http://rec-law.us/1nbZH2J

7/24

CO

Whitewater Rafting

Arkansas River, The Numbers

Fell out of raft

Timberline Tours

F

Dallas, TX

57

http://rec-law.us/1lC3ReN

http://rec-law.us/1pmumpZ

9/13

TN

Whitewater Rafting

Ocoee River

Raft flipped

Endless River Adventures

M

Clayton, NC

50

http://rec-law.us/1tTRGT9

http://rec-law.us/1oNpJWi

Several of the water fatalities can be medical. A sudden full body cold water immersion can cause vasoconstriction in the hear resulting in death. See the Wikipedia listing Cold shock response.

If you are unable to see this graph, please email me at Rec-law@recreation-law.com and I will send you a PDF of the page.

What do you think? Leave a comment.

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Alberta’s mountain guide service is being sued because two clients were drugged and robbed on Kilimanjaro. After drugging, client still summited the mountain.

 

Plaintiff claims they are suing because statements made by the

 English: January 15, 1938. Mt. Kilimanjaro: Th...outfitter angered them and because outfitter never called to apologize. Robbed client’s parent is a California attorney.

 So according to the news report three people, one the attorney, her daughter and a male friend booked a trip with Berg Adventures International to climb Mt. Kilimanjaro. The mother booked the trip with Berg because of its “its reputation for providing comfortable, full-service travel experiences.”

 The mother/plaintiff’s attorney was not present that night; she turned back because of altitude problems. After being drugged and robbed, the two ascended to the summit: “two did continue to the summit, but she claims that was the fastest way off the mountain

 I don’t know what is the fastest way off the summit, however, going up is rarely faster than going down, even if going down requires you to go down and around.

 Why did they sue?

 Lewis said she decided to sue Berg Adventures International after the company failed to contact her or apologize for what the travellers went through.

 She said she was also angered the company posted dispatches from the trip on its website, congratulating her daughter and her friend for their rapid descent of the mountain, without acknowledging that the reason was to seek medical treatment.

 I read, and you can read the posted dispatches here: March 6, 2014 – The Team Summits

Ascend past Rebmann Glacier Mt. Kilimanjaro

Ascend past Rebmann Glacier Mt. Kilimanjaro (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Kilimanjaro. They do not say why the couple decided to summit and then descend so quickly, but they are not negative. At that point in time, I would guess that on one really knew what had happened anyway.

 Is this an overreaction, an attempt to get a refund or can you find something that Berg Adventures International did that was negligent?

 Reputation comes from third parties, so I’m not sure how that could indicate a negligent act. Besides even if it were advertising the law allows a lot of leeway for puffing or statements made to close a sale.

 There is also an issue of jurisdiction. Hopefully, Berg Adventures International used a release, and it had a jurisdiction and venue clause requiring the suit to be in Alberta Canada.

 I’m not sure I would have advised my client to apologize, but some contact would have helped. To understand why people may sue based on emotional issues see:

 It’s Not Money                                                                                               http://rec-law.us/zxmmqy

 Her life is permanently changed, but she really wants an apology    http://rec-law.us/yHjVn0

 Make sure you understand what the other side is saying                    http://rec-law.us/1b5m1mt

 Money is important in some lawsuits, but the emotions that starts a lawsuit.           http://rec-law.us/xbSs4M

 Serious Disconnect: Why people sue.                                        http://rec-law.us/wm2cBn

 Why do people sue? Not for the money.                                     http://rec-law.us/A0866T

 $700,000 in damages after summiting Kilimanjaro seems a little difficult to prove also. The agreement was to try to assist you in summiting…..seems like they did?

 See Alberta tour operator faces lawsuit over African misadventure

 Dispatches that created the anger can be located here: March 6, 2014 – The Team Summits Kilimanjaro..

 What do you think? Leave a comment.

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