Human Dimensions Conference Call for abstracts

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Don’t Forget to Submit and Abstract

Abstract and Organized Session Proposal Deadline: May 1, 2012

Pathways to Success Conference & Training:

Integrating Human Dimensions into Fisheries and Wildlife Management

Breckenridge, Colorado

Beaver Run Resort

September 24-27, 2012

Visit our website at www.hdfwconference.org to learn more.

Keynote speaker: Gary Machlis, Chief Science Advisor, NPS

Conference Themes:

Biodiversity and Coupled Social-Ecological Systems
Fish and Wildlife Governance
The Changing Nature of Wildlife Conservation
Enduring Issues in HDFW
Improving HDFW Science
Increasing HDFW Capacity
Working with the Public
Implications of Global Change
Human Wildlife Conflict
Wildlife in an Ecosystem Services Paradigm
Discourses about Wildlife
Demographics and Fish and Wildlife Policy

Mike Manfredo

Conference Co-Chair, Pathways to Success Integrating Human Dimension into Fish and Wildlife Management

Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Department

Colorado State University

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Jerry Vaske

Conference Co-Chair, Pathways to Success Integrating Human Dimension into Fish and Wildlife Management

Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Department

Colorado State University

Dan Decker

Conference Co-Chair, Pathways to Success Integrating Human Dimension into Fish and Wildlife Management

Professor, Natural Resources

Director, Human Dimensions Research Unit

Cornell University

Esther Duke

Coordinator, Pathways to Success: Integrating Human Dimension into Fish and Wildlife Management Conference

Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Department

Colorado State University

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Pathways to Success Conference & Training: Integrating Human Dimensions into Fish and Wildlife Management

Register Today

Pathways to Success Conference & Training:

Fish Head Pinyon Pine

Fish Head Pinyon Pine (Photo credit: James Marvin Phelps)

Integrating Human Dimensions into Fish and Wildlife Management

Breckenridge, Colorado

Beaver Run Resort

September 24-27, 2012

Visit our website at www.hdfwconference.org to learn more.

Keynote speaker: Gary Machlis, Chief Science Advisor, NPS

Abstract and Proposal Deadline: May 1, 2012

Conference Themes:

Biodiversity and Coupled Social-Ecological Systems
Fish and Wildlife Governance
The Changing Nature of Wildlife Conservation
Enduring Issues in HDFW
Improving HDFW Science
Increasing HDFW Capacity
Working with the Public
Implications of Global Change
Human Wildlife Conflict
Wildlife in an Ecosystem Services Paradigm
Discourses about Wildlife
Demographics and Fish and Wildlife Policy

Mike Manfredo

Conference Co-Chair, Pathways to Success Integrating Human Dimension into Fish and Wildlife Management

Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Department

Colorado State University

Jerry Vaske

Conference Co-Chair, Pathways to Success Integrating Human Dimension into Fish and Wildlife Management

Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Department

Colorado State University

Northernmost natural population

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Dan Decker

Conference Co-Chair, Pathways to Success Integrating Human Dimension into Fish and Wildlife Management

Professor, Natural Resources

Director, Human Dimensions Research Unit

Cornell University

Esther Duke

Coordinator, Pathways to Success: Integrating Human Dimension into Fish and Wildlife Management Conference

Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Department

Colorado State University

Esther Duke

Coordinator of Special Projects and Programs

Human Dimensions of Natural Resources

Colorado State University

970.491.2197

Esther.Duke

 

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Journal of Park and Recreation Administration (JPRA) Call for Papers: Managing Protected Areas: Global Perspectives

Call for Paper

sRaet protected area, Hove in Arendal

Journal of Park and Recreation Administration (JPRA)

Special Issue: Managing Protected Areas: Global Perspectives
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The establishment of Yellowstone National Park (the world’s first national park) in 1872 has been the foundation for the global protected area movement for biodiversity conservation. This legacy is evident with the significant global growth in the protected areas network which currently constitutes approximately 12% of the world’s land surface, but only about 1% for marine protected areas. The substantial growth in protected areas has occurred over the past three decades with considerable increase in developing countries. However, with expansion, the concept of protected areas has evolved beyond the traditional model of strict biodiversity conservation to incorporate improvement of local livelihoods.Protected areas are generally managed by government entities to safeguard the natural, ecological, and cultural values. However, this model of management has also diversified to incorporate alternate approaches such as co-managed protected areas, indigenous and community conserved areas, private protected areas, and so forth. Given the various types, multiple use, and management structures in protected areas, the need for effective management to meet respective objectives is critical. The challenges vary among different types and location of protected areas, as developing countries have a more pronounced requirement to engage and improve local community’s needs.Protected area management is complex as managers will need to find the optimal balance with respect to environmental, sociocultural, and economic issues within and adjacent to the management area. The three dimensions are not mutually exclusive as an integrated approach is preferred for contemporary protected area management. This call for papers invites conceptual and empirical research, case studies, and comparative analysis. Submission that details research, concepts, and practices relevant to current understanding and management of protected areas will be given priority. Also, given the JPRA audience, it is important that research implications should have relevance for managers of protected areas and policy makers. This special issue has been formulated to contribute to the discourse leading to the 6th International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) World Parks Congress to be held in 2014. The IUCN World Parks Congress is the largest global forum on protected areas that is held once in every decade.

JPRA invites papers for a special edition entitled Managing Protected Areas: Global Perspectives. Submissions might include but not be limited to the following topics:

Manuscripts will need to follow the format instructions for the Journal of Park and Recreation Administrationand will undergo the normal blind review process with three reviewers. The deadline for submission of papers is November 1, 2012. The special edition is scheduled for publication in the third quarter issue of 2013. Papers should be submitted with a cover letter by email to:Brijesh Thapa, Ph.D.Eric Friedheim Tourism Institute

Department of Tourism, Recreation and Sport Management

University of Florida

Gainesville, FL 32611-8208, US

bthapa

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International Union for Conservation of Nature...

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WMS Trailblazer – January 2012

[Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) Updates]

5.jpg?a=1102933063419Leading the worldwide community of Wilderness Medicine
Trailblazer – January 2012
The WMS Staff would like to wish each of you a happy and healthy new year!Remember, we’re here for you. So, if there’s anything we can do to help you, please let us know.Loren Greenway | <a href=”mailto:teri | Jonna Barry | <a href=”mailto:jim
Announcements

Wilderness & Mountain Medicine ConferenceAmphu_laptse.jpgFebruary 4-8, 2012

Park City, Utah

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Eleventh Biennial Coalition for Education in the Outdoors Research Symposium

We write to remind you that the Eleventh Biennial Coalition for Education in the Outdoors Research Symposium is just a month away. It will be held from January 13-15, 2012 at Indiana University’s Bradford Woods.

Registrations have been arriving daily, but it’s not too late. If you’ve been meaning to register, please do so. The registration information and preliminary schedule of events and papers are attached and also available at www.outdooredcoalition.org.

Here’s what you can look forward to:

· The symposium will include over 30 research presentations (see attached schedule) on various outcomes or aspects of outdoor programs conducted in school, camp, college, adventure, and other contexts. Many of these papers investigate program components underlying outcomes.

· We have structured time for participants to identify and discuss issues and challenges facing our field.

· Peg Smith, Chief Executive Officer of the American Camp Association and active participant in the No Child Left Inside Coalition, is the featured speaker on Friday evening. (See http://www.acacamps.org/about/pegsmith)

· Beyond the formal presentations, the symposium is a unique and ideal opportunity to interact with others in the field. The event attracts established and emerging scholars from a host of disciplines and leaders from professional associations and agencies. As such, it is a gathering of persons that would not occur at any other conference. The setting, the people, and the program make opportunities for meaningful conversation abundant. The CEO symposium has been the starting point for many long-lasting research and professional collaborations.

· The combined lodging, food and registration costs for the weekend range from $208 – $248, depending on the type of lodging selected.

Please join us again in January. You won’t be disappointed.

Sincerely,

Karen Paisley Andy Young Sharon Todd

For the CEO Research Committee

The Coalition for Education in the Outdoors (CEO), established in 1987, is an educational service of the State University of New York (SUNY) at Cortland. The CEO Research Committee includes:

M. Deborah Bialeschki, American Camp Association

Camille Bunting, Texas A&M*

Chris Cashel, University of Oklahoma*

Alan Ewert, Indiana University

Michael Gass, University of New Hampshire

Karla Henderson, North Carolina State University

Leo McAvoy, University of Minnesota*

Karen Paisley, University of Utah

Keith C. Russell, Western Washington University

Jim Sibthorp, University of Utah

Anderson Young, SUNY Cortland

*Emeritus Committee Members

CEO 2012 Reg Info.pdf

CEO Symposium SchedulePRELIMINARY.pdf


Staying Current

Legal Reasons Why You Should be at your Industry Conference

You also do not want to miss out on all the fun!

People attend conferences for numerous reasons. To see old friends, meet new friends or to save money. The money you can save by buying equipment at a conference will usually pay for the trip. However, many people miss a very and important reason for attending their industry conference. Attending could keep you from being sued. This is a hidden, but very important benefit of attending a conference that most people do not appreciate until they are sitting on the witness stand in a courtroom.

There are several defenses you can use in running your outdoor recreation business. Releases and Assumption of the Risk are the two biggest and the ones most frequently use. Both to some extent revolve around the question whether you met the “reasonable standard for the industry.” Reasonable is defined as what a reasonable person would do in the same situation. Standard is the level of safety or knowledge and practice of safety required Industry is the paddling business industry. The definition combines to create a safety requirement that is the absolute minimum that a reasonable person running an outdoor recreation business would do. Standards are not goals; however, falling below the standard will almost always guaranty a losing lawsuit or at least increasing the cost of winning one.

Standards are floating. It is not always the same for a state, region or the nation. The standard will also change based on the water level, the type of river you are on, the equipment you are using and in several cases the types of guests to whom you are marketing. A recreation business in a rural area with a slow mellow stream that market’s to local people may have a different standard then when on a stream with small rapids near a large city and marketing to the masses. As such, you need to meet other people who are applying the same standard in the industry that you are using. You may also need to converse with people who are applying higher standards. History shows that companies move up to meet the standards for better operations or operations with higher standards.

Standards are not made, written down or created in courtrooms. They are constantly changing and they can only be found in the eyes and actions of everyone else in the industry. In trials, expert witnesses are brought in to tell the jury what the standard of care in a particular situation should have been. These expert opinions are based on the knowledge of the accident and a broad knowledge of the industry. You need to maintain your knowledge level of the industry at the same level as the experts. You are required to know the standard of the industry and your standards when running any business.

“Why does attending a conference change the way I do business?” Because the only way you can find out about a change in the standards is by meeting and greeting other people in the industry. If you have not attended a conference in several years, you may not know that the majority of states now require Personal Flotation Devices‘ for children. Even though your state may not require them, the standard has changed. You may not be required by law to provide a PFD, however, the standard is that one will be required and as such you have dropped below what the reasonable person would do in your situation.

Without attending a conference and seeing what everyone else is doing, you will not stay current in the industry. As such, you are wearing a target on your back that says sue me. Only personal injury attorneys can see that target. But see it they will when someone is hurt at your business.


There are other reasons for attending the conference. Unless you have hired an attorney to stay current on the issues or a lobbyist, you may have missed a change in the law. Many laws are passed each year that do not make the news. Old laws may also change. A great example of that is how courts have interpreted laws in West Virginia and Colorado recently. Unless you attend a conference, you may not know how new or interpreted laws have changed over the past year. What was a defense to the horseback riding industry in Colorado is now a welcome mat for lawsuits.

New ways to promote safety show up at conferences. New ideas that one business develops in their program can be a great way to keep your guests safe. New equipment is debuted, with the plusses and minuses at conferences.

New ideas also change the legal environment. A new product by a manufacture showing at the Conference can quickly change the standard for an industry. A new design of boat, Personal Flotation Device or trailer may suddenly make your system a risky liability issue.

These changes will not only affect whether a guest can sue you for injuries but also whether your own employees can sue you. Lifting canoes to the top level of a trailer may cause worker’s compensation injuries. A new design that promotes employee health and welfare could save thousands in worker’s compensation benefits.

The final legal reason for attending a conference is the overall education you receive. Judges and juries look at witnesses and examine their credibility. People who are honest are the witnesses’ juries believe. Honesty is not just how you are on the stand when you are testifying, but how you ran your business. An honest and upstanding member of the business community is going to continually want to improve his business. Being a member of your professional organization and attending the yearly conferences shows a jury that you care enough about your business and your clients to spend the extra time and money to run your business the best way possible. If you are willing to show an interest in your clients by receiving the most up to date education, you must not be as bad as you are being portrayed by the opposing attorney.

Some insurance companies give discounts on premium for attending a conference. They know that the company that attends a conference is concerned about staying current with the industry and keeping their operation as top notch as possible. Companies that attend conferences and get the most possible from a conference are less likely to have accidents that cost insurance company’s money.

Go to this year’s Conference and increase your chances of not going to court!

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