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Call for Papers: Tourist studies: Tourism Moralities and Mobilities

Call for Papers – Tourist Studies

Special Issue: TOURISM MORALITIES AND MOBILITIES

Guest Editors: Dr. Bryan Grimwood and Dr. Kellee Caton

Several recent epistemological ‘turns’ within tourism studies have enriched and complicated the landscapes of knowledge produced and used within the field. The ‘moral’ (Caton, 2012) and ‘mobility’ (Hannam, 2009) turns are two examples that, when taken together, produce fertile terrain for generating important questions and new meanings about tourism (e.g., Grimwood, 2014). The purpose of this special issue of Tourist Studies is to examine and critique the intersections of tourism moralities and mobilities. More specifically, we seek papers that contribute to fleshing out, and teasing apart, the conceptual, theoretical, methodological, and empirical nature of tourism moralities and mobilities. That tourism mobilities give shape to diverse spaces and places, including the ‘embodied’, ‘mundane’, and ‘exotic’ (Edensor, 2007; Reis, 2013), is justification enough for thinking through moral questions and perspectives. That moralities are likely to shift or become entrenched as we move through tourism spaces adds additional degrees of relevance to the special issue theme (Mostafanezhad & Hannam, 2014).

The guest editors invite submissions that speak to the intersections of tourism moralities and mobilities. We especially encourage papers that shift consideration away from what morality is to what morality does or can do in relation to tourism mobilities (and vice versa). Potential questions underpinning contributions may include:

  • How do we carry morality with us (in tourism and in tourism research) and to what effect? How does morality become anchored/moored in touristic places, or performed across tourism spaces? To what extent is morality mobile?
  • How are tourism mobilities disciplined/controlled by moralities? What spaces of resistance can be/are being mobilized through the practice and being of tourism moralities?
  • How (or to what extent?) do tourist, community, researcher, and non-human subjectivities move/shift in relation to moralities encountered through tourism?
  • How (or to what extent?) are multiple moralities consumed/performed through tourism mobilities, including those associated with tourism research?
  • In a world increasingly (re)made in relation to various (im)mobilities, what moral positionalities are most productive/destructive?
  • What anchors morality when ontological and epistemological foundations are multiple, hybrid, and/or fluid? As scholars? As researchers? As an epistemic community?
  • What is (or should be) the role of morality in tourism epistemology? What meanings or insights does morality provide in relation to how knowledge moves and changes (or doesn’t) in our field, and how certain knowledge is (or fails to be) legitimized?
  • What can tourism studies learn from inter-/multi-/trans-/post-disciplinary approaches to moralities and mobilities? What contributions do such perspective make to the field of tourism studies?

In addition to those with interests in the intersections of tourism morality and mobility, we anticipate the special issue to resonate with scholars situated within ‘critical’ and ‘hopeful’ tourism studies (Pritchard et al., 2011) and build on recent literatures that have helped contextualize tourism ethics from multi-disciplinary perspectives (e.g., Fennell, 2006; Mostafanezhad & Hannam, 2014; Weeden & Boluk, 2014).

Important Dates:

· Abstracts of 250 words must be submitted no later than May 01, 2015. Please submit your abstract to the guest editors, Dr. Bryan Grimwood (bgrimwood) and Dr. Kellee Caton (Kcaton).

· Authors of selected papers will be notified by May 15, 2015.

· Full manuscripts are due to the guest editors by September 15, 2015. The target length of papers is 8000 words and all style guidelines of Tourist Studies must be followed (see http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201263/manuscriptSubmission). A preliminary review of all submissions will help authors shape and revise papers prior to the usual blind review process commencing.

· We are targeting December 2016 as the final publication date. Tourist Studies has allocated Volume 16, Issue 3 for this special issue.

References:

Caton, K. (2012). Taking the moral turn in tourism studies. Annals of Tourism Research, 39(4),

1906–1928.

Edensor, T. (2007). Mundane mobilities, performances and spaces of tourism. Social and

Cultural Geography, 8(2), 199–215.

Fennell, D. A. (2006). Tourism ethics. New York: Routledge.

Hannam, K. (2009). The end of tourism? Nomadology and the mobilities paradigm. In J. Tribe

(ed.) Philosophical issues in tourism (pp. 101-113). Toronto, ON: Channel View Publications.

Grimwood, B. S. R. (2014). Advancing tourism’s moral morphology: Relational metaphors for

just and sustainable arctic tourism. Tourist Studies, 1–24, DOI: 10.1177/1468797614550960.

Mostafanezhad, M., & Hannam, K. (Eds.) (2014). Moral encounters in tourism. Burlington, VT:

Ashgate.

Pritchard, A., Morgan, N., & Ateljevic, I. (2011). Hopeful tourism: A transformative approach.

Annals of Tourism Research, 38(3), 941-963.

Reis, A. C. (2012). Experiences of commodified nature: Performances and narratives of

nature-based tourists on Stewart Island, New Zealand. Tourist Studies, 12(3), 305–324.

Weeden, C., & Boluk, K. (Eds.). (2014). Managing ethical consumption in tourism. New York:

Routledge.

CFP _ Tourism Moralities & Mobilities.pdf

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