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Natural Resource Careers Summit – Help Shape Tools for Youth Career Development

Are you a career influencer? Do you support youth in exploring natural resource or environmental careers through environmental education programming? If so, please join the Colorado Alliance for Environmental Education (CAEE) and Colorado Youth Corps Assocation (CYCA) at the 2018 Careers in Natural Resources Initiative Summit!

WHEN: Tuesday, September 25th from 9:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

WHERE: Colorado Parks & Wildlife – Hunter Education Building, 6060 Broadway, Denver

REGISTER HERE

A major focus of the Summit will be to discuss and begin to move forward on several exciting new projects including:

  • Development of a High School Natural Resource Careers Awareness Resource
  • Assembling an Advisory Committee to provide guidance on the development of the High School Awareness Resource
  • Distribution and use of the brand new Spanish translated version of the “How-To Guide for Pursuing a Career in Natural Resources”

Who should attend?

· Government agencies, non-profits and businesses interested in building pathways for youth to enter the natural resource field and in increasing the diversity of applicants for natural resource positions.

· K-12 and higher education institutions interested in connecting their students to natural resource career information.

· Environmental education providers, youth corps, and other youth-serving organizations interested in how they can incorporate natural resource career messaging into their programming and serve as better career mentors to their participants.

This event is FREE and lunch is included.

Register by September 20th.

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Garmin: You don’t know what you are talking about, you are just a consumer! Jim: For the third time in 3 years I find out I was right. Garmin: no, we are not wrong therefore you are not right.

Garmin updates are messing up their products. When that happens, their tech support says it is your fault or if out of warranty, broke. No specific instance of buy another one, but what else can you do?

Below is the latest email message trail with Garmin Tech Support. The problem started when my Garmin Edge 1000 could not be found by my computer. Information was downloading by Wi-Fi but I could not get my Garmin to work.

In the process of working on my Edge 1000 to get it to work again, I did two factory resets. I did a boot block. Each time you have to sit down with your Garmin and re-enter all the information and hook up all your sensors, etc. I have four different bikes I use my Garmin with.

I took my Edge 1000 to 2018 Summer @OutdoorRetailer and had the people at the Garmin booth try and get my Edge 1000 to work. No luck.

As you can see from the last email, Garmin Tech Support determined that the pins on my Edge 1000 were busted and my Garmin was sort of dead.

I went for a ride 2 days ago and to recharge the battery hooked it up to my computer again. While looking for a file on my computer I noticed my Garmin Edge 1000 was there, another drive.

I clicked on Garmin Express, the software that links to your Garmin product so you can sync, upload or download info. My Edge 1000 was there and it synched.

Here is the email conversation with Garmin

Hi Jim,

The port on the back of the Edge should have four pins, two for power and two for data. Most likely the data pins are damaged. If you have any other questions or require further support please do not hesitate to let us know or visit our support center (https://support.garmin.com/en-US/).

US: 1.888.442.7646 Canada: 1-866-429-9296 Monday through Friday, 7AM to 7PM. Central Standard Time. Closed Holidays.

Thank you for choosing Garmin,

>> Sent: 24/07/2018 08:12

I appreciate the offer but my edge is way too old and has been replaced once already.

What I find confusing is it can be charged. It just can’t be found? That is a connection issue?

Slow to respond because I’m at the outdoor retailer tradeshow. I’ll see the Garmin sales team today.

More later.

THANKS

Jim

From: Product.Support@garmin.com <Product.Support@garmin.com>

Hello Jim,

>> I am sorry about the issues you are having today. I would be happy to work with you towards a resolution today. It seems like the port on the back of the device is damaged. Does the port on the back of the device look damaged or corroded? We suggest cleaning it out with something like canned air if you haven’t yet. If this doesn’t resolve your issue your device may need to be exchanged.

•    What is the serial number for your Edge? It is located on the back, underneath the weather cap.

•    How long have you had the device?

o    For more information about our warranty policies, please visit: https://www.garmin.com/en-US/legal/consumer-limited-warranty

Once we have the above information we will be able to provide further support. If you have any other questions or require further support please do not hesitate to let us know or visit our support center (https://support.garmin.com/en-US/).

>> US: 1.888.442.7646 Canada: 1-866-429-9296 Monday through Friday, 7AM to 7PM. Central Standard Time. Closed Holidays.

Thank you for choosing Garmin,

>> Original Message …

>> >> From: jhmoss@gmail.com

>> >> To: Product.Support@garmin.com

Three computers do not recognize my edge 1000. All have Garmin Express. All know I have an Edge 1000 and ate least one other product. None of them can find my edge 1000. I have tried different USB cables, I have tried using USB hubs and plugging directly into a computer USB port. I have rebooted the computer. the Edge 1000 was just factor reset also and it is still not recognized. It is currently plugged into the original computer I have used for the past 3 years to recognize it and it is “searching.” I let it search for 24 hours. Unplug, go for a ride and plug back in.

I also cannot set up the WIFI in the Edge 1000 because of this.

Jim Moss

On Tue, Mar 24, 2015 at 11:31 PM, James H. (Jim) Moss <jhmoss@gmail.com> wrote:

Did a full factory reset and it still is not being found.

Tried my third cable. Still not being found.

Restarted my computer, still not found.

By the way, I rarely use Garmin for anything Map my Rides and Ride with GPS and they still cannot find the Edge 1000 or my Fenix 2. Nor is windows explorer finding them.

I’m also getting error messages that the communicator plug in is not working.

I have tried switching to different USB ports, 3.0 and 2.0 working from hubs or directly to the computer and still nothing. I just started getting Unknown USB Device messages when I just switched USB ports again.

Garmin Connect did find my Garmin Memory card just now. Memory Card (f:\) however Windows Explorer is not showing an F drive.

Both the Fenix 2 and the Edge 1000 are charging. The Edge 1000 keeps searching for satellites no matter what I do. Garmin Express can’t find anything

Jim

From: Product.Support@garmin.com [mailto:Product.Support@garmin.com]

Dear Jim Moss,

Thank you for contacting Garmin International.

I am sorry to hear that you are still having issues with your Edge 1000. I would be happy to assist you with this.

Have you tried restarting your computer? If that does not work we may need to master reset the device,

There are a few instances in which it may be necessary to perform a master reset on the Edge. A master reset should be performed if the device is:

•    Not functioning properly

•    Needing to be restored to factory default settings

•    Not receiving a satellite signal

•    To bring up the language selection prompt if incorrect language text is displayed

•    Unable to pair accessories2, such as a heart rate monitor or speed/cadence sensor

All settings, workouts and satellite data may be erased when resetting the GPS. Workouts can be backed up in Garmin Connect. If you wish to keep your personalized settings, you will need to backup your device.

To perform a master reset:

1.    Power device off

2.    Press and hold Lap and Start/Stop

3.    Power device on while still holding both buttons

4.    Continue holding buttons when the Garmin “splash” screen appears

5.    Release buttons when Garmin “splash” screen disappears

The reset is successful if, once powered up, the device proceeds into the initial setup wizard. Once the reset and setup wizard are complete, place the device outside with a clear view of the sky for a minimum of 20 minutes to acquire satellite data.

If you have additional questions or concerns, please respond to this email or feel free to call us.

We are available Monday-Thursday 8:00am-6pm CST and Friday 8:00am-5:00pmCST. Closed holidays.

Garmin Product Support (800)800-1020

>> Original Message …

>> >> >> From: jhmoss@gmail.com

>> >> >> To: Product.Support@garmin.com

Did not change anything. Garmin Express can’t find the Edge 1000 nor can the computer.

From: Product.Support@garmin.com [mailto:Product.Support@garmin.com]

>> >> >> Sent: Tuesday, March 24, 2015 11:31 AM

>> >> >> To: jhmoss@gmail.com

I’m learning. If I start a ride and none of my sensors are connected then I know that my Edge has been updated by Garmin. I have to start playing around, eventually stopping the ride to re-connect the sensors. I have a dozen hour long rides that recorded 7 minutes of riding and jumps on my bike for miles until I finally got tired of trying to reconnect the sensors. I give up and work on them when I get home.

Update 1

I had not used my Edge 1000 for over a month. It was connected to my computer with the same USB cable I had used for the past year. One day I looked at it and realized it had connected again. I opened Garmin Express and voila it was there!

So, with no input on my part it is now working again.

Update 2

I tweeted about these issues before I wrote this article. I received the following from Garmin


More

Replying to @RecreationLaw

Hi Jim, I’d be happy to review your situation. Please send us a DM with the details as well as the email address you used when contacting support. -MR

  1. Jim, Thank you for the information and your patience with us over the extended Holiday weekend. Just to clarify, the Product Support associate was offering a possible cause for the issue you described. You claimed that a software update resolved your issue. However, the most recent update for the Edge 1000 was released in mid-March. I’ve looked over the software change history for the Edge 1000, but I see nothing mentioning any fix to connectivity issues. The updates included in 14.70, released mid-March as I mentioned, were: •Added Connect IQ 2.4.2 support. •Fixed an issue that could cause the device to crash when syncing segments. •Fixed an issue with the backlight not turning on consistently. •Fixed an issue with the user’s FTP resetting after changing the power zone configuration. I can understand your frustration and that you’re dissatisfied. Our associates have been assisting you as best they can with the information they have. Your device was believed to be up-to-date because you had been in contact with us multiple times since the software released in March, you were having issues with connectivity, and we currently have no open tickets that I can find regarding that type of issue on the Edge 1000. The suggestion that the data pins might have been damaged, dirty, or corroded was not an attempt at passing the buck, but rather a way for us to determine the cause of the issue you were experiencing. It sounds like updating the device resolved the issue for you, though looking at the change log, I don’t see how/why that would have worked or why an update would have presented itself if you’d already updated the product since the last release in March. Nevertheless, I’m glad to hear that things are running smoothly again. Thank you, -XXXX

    Sep 4

  2. The device was plugged in to a USB port since bringing it back from OR so nothing changed for a couple of weeks. I’ll correct my statements based on this, but honestly, based on my history with Garmin, I don’t buy it. https://recreation-law.com/2018/04/04/i-took-my-garmin-vivosport-off-in-fact-im-done-with-it/ 
    https://recreation-law.com/2018/02/28/i-love-garmin-products-i-hate-garmin/ 

    So, what is up? Could it be fate (not love just something out of my control.) or are map updates enough to mess with my Edge 1000. Or am I off my rocker and just wrong about everything?

    The reason why I’m guessing that even a map update, which seems to occur daily, can affect the rest of the Edge 1000 is because my sensors go offline, all of them more times a year than Garmin says they update the Edge 1000

    I don’t know. I and felt obligated to provide Garmin’s side of the story. However, part of me does not buy it.

    I’ll be at Interibke next week, I’ll see if any tech’s there have an opinion.

    What do you think? Leave a comment.

    Copyright 2018 Recreation Law (720) 334 8529

    If you like this let your friends know or post it on FB, Twitter or LinkedIn





    If you are interested in having me write your release, fill out this Information Form and Contract and send it to me.

    Author: Outdoor Recreation Insurance, Risk Management and Law

    To Purchase Go Here:

    Facebook Page: Outdoor Recreation & Adventure Travel Law

    Email: Rec-law@recreation-law.com

    Google+: +Recreation

    Twitter: RecreationLaw

    Facebook: Rec.Law.Now

    Facebook Page: Outdoor Recreation & Adventure Travel Law

    Blog:
    www.recreation-law.com

    Mobile Site: http://m.recreation-law.com

    By Recreation Law    Rec-law@recreation-law.com    James H. Moss

    #AdventureTourism, #AdventureTravelLaw, #AdventureTravelLawyer, #AttorneyatLaw, #Backpacking, #BicyclingLaw, #Camps, #ChallengeCourse, #ChallengeCourseLaw, #ChallengeCourseLawyer, #CyclingLaw, #FitnessLaw, #FitnessLawyer, #Hiking, #HumanPowered, #HumanPoweredRecreation, #IceClimbing, #JamesHMoss, #JimMoss, #Law, #Mountaineering, #Negligence, #OutdoorLaw, #OutdoorRecreationLaw, #OutsideLaw, #OutsideLawyer, #RecLaw, #Rec-Law, #RecLawBlog, #Rec-LawBlog, #RecLawyer, #RecreationalLawyer, #RecreationLaw, #RecreationLawBlog, #RecreationLawcom, #Recreation-Lawcom, #Recreation-Law.com, #RiskManagement, #RockClimbing, #RockClimbingLawyer, #RopesCourse, #RopesCourseLawyer, #SkiAreas, #Skiing, #SkiLaw, #Snowboarding, #SummerCamp, #Tourism, #TravelLaw, #YouthCamps, #ZipLineLawyer,


Want a Job Working on the River? USFS has 6 River Ranger Positions Open on Snake River!

Seasonal hiring started earlier this year for Forest Service seasonal workforce for Summer 2019. The Application period open day on September 10, 2018 and close at midnight EST October 10, 2018

Jackson Ranger District will be hiring up to 6 Forestry Technician “River Ranger” in Jackson, Wyoming on the Snake River ranger from GS-04 to GS-06.. The GS-06 will be serve as the crew lead.

Announcement numbers

GS-04 19‐TEMP‐R4‐FTRECRR‐4DT‐BV
GS-05 19‐TEMP‐R4‐FTRECRVR‐5DT‐BV
GS -06 19‐TEMP‐R4‐FTREC‐6DT‐BV

Please contract for addition information or question about the River Ranger Positions

David Cernicek – River Manager
307-739-5417
dcernicek

John Newman – Lead River Ranger
307-739-5538
johnnewman

Thanks,
John B. Newman

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“Supporting professionals who study, manage and protect North America’s rivers”

River Management Society ~ PO Box 5750, Takoma Park, MD USA 20913-5750 ~ +1-301-585-4677

open?upn=GJ4razR2F2b9e2-2BhTGB4XftE9mPndUqfrrTiMJcmXrtxlIQ3vqgcR0C0-2Bw9S39wAM0waKkgSc0owo8mmuaVjA8y03bVc7VMrs9YYlxirIY4WLtlYqnAwpG8ke7MPH56qskSI4dxRe1pg9g0nkrifKEGW4-2FlPF90KcV2MMe0jGu98TX7hhrCcOza3yKjTbIX47LWLwWqwcDP0KHBjrbld77e-2BkgHTAncELxyFF-2FXc2qElhUnK2tkq66GnaLfZPSm-2F6VUbWP-2FC1Nv3Kf1eKqG-2FmcLS2Ltbq4EYaKOHCylQDdxaheXZJfDIY-2Fv4s3FyQDrZ28DgMT4frM8jW8UnvntnMg-3D-3DRiver 2019.docx


The actual risk causing the injury to the plaintiff was explicitly identified in the release and used by the court as proof it was a risk of skiing and snowboarding. If it was in the release, then it was a risk.

Plaintiff hit a snowcat and was severely injured when she was sucked under the tiller. Mammoth Mountain Ski Area was not liable because of the release and snowcats on the mountain are an inherent risk of skiing and snowboarding.

Willhide-Michiulis v. Mammoth Mt. Ski Area, LLC, 2018 Cal. App. Unpub. LEXIS 4363

State: California, Court of Appeal of California, Third Appellate District

Plaintiff: Kathleen Willhide-Michiulis et al (and her husband Bruno Michiulis)

Defendant: Mammoth Mountain Ski Area, LLC

Plaintiff Claims: negligence, gross negligence and loss of consortium

Defendant Defenses: Assumption of the risk and release

Holding: for the defendant ski area Mammoth Mt. Ski Area

Year: 2018

Summary

When skiing or snowboarding you assume the risk of seeing a snowcat grooming on the slopes in California. If you run into a snowcat and get sucked into the tiller you have no lawsuit against the ski area.

A snowcat at Mammoth Mountain Ski Area is a great big red slow-moving machine with flashing lights and sirens. They are hard to miss, so therefore they are something you assume the risk when on the slopes.

Facts

The injury suffered by the plaintiff and how it occurred is gruesome. She hit a snowcat while snowboarding and fell between the cat and the tiller. Before the cat could stop she was run over and entangled in the tiller eventually losing one leg and suffering multiple other injuries.

Plaintiff Kathleen Willhide-Michiulis was involved in a tragic snowboarding accident at Mammoth Mountain Ski Area. On her last run of the day, she collided with a snowcat pulling a snow-grooming tiller and got caught in the tiller. The accident resulted in the amputation of her left leg, several skull fractures and facial lacerations, among other serious injuries

The plaintiff was snowboarding on her last run of the night. She spotted the snow cat 150 feet ahead of her on the run. When she looked up again, she collided with the snowcat.

While Willhide-Michiulis rode down mambo, she was in control of her snowboard and traveling on the left side of the run. She saw the snowcat about 150 feet ahead of her on the trail. It was traveling downhill and in the middle of the run. Willhide-Michiulis initiated a “carve” to her left to go further to the left of the snowcat. When she looked up, the snowcat had “cut off her path” and she could not avoid a collision. Willhide-Michiulis hit the back-left corner of the snowcat and her board went into the gap between the tracks of the snowcat and the tiller. Willhide-Michiulis was then pulled into the tiller.

The defendant Mammoth Mountain Ski Area posted warning signs at the top and bottom of every run warning that snowcats and other vehicles may be on the runs. The season pass releases the plaintiff, and her husband signed also recognized the risk of snowcats and identified them as such.

Further, in Willhide-Michiulis’s season-pass agreement, she acknowledged she understood “the sport involves numerous risks including, but not limited to, the risks posed by variations in terrain and snow conditions, . . . unmarked obstacles, . . . devices, . . . and other hazards whether they are obvious or not. I also understand that the sport involves risks posed by loss of balance . . . and collisions with natural and man-made objects, including . . . snow making equipment, snowmobiles and other over-snow vehicles.

The trial court concluded the plaintiff assumed the risks of her injury and granted the ski area motion for summary judgment. The plaintiff appealed that decision, and this appellate decision is the result of that appeal.

Analysis: making sense of the law based on these facts.

The decision included a massive recounting of the facts of the case both before the analysis and throughout it. Additionally, the court reviewed several issues that are not that important here, whether the trial court properly dismissed the plaintiff’s expert opinions and whether or not the location of the case was proper.

Releases in California are evolving into proof of express assumption of the risk. The court reviewed the issues of whether Mammoth met is burden of showing the risks the plaintiff assumed were inherent in the sport of snowboarding. The facts in the release signed by the plaintiff supported that assumption of the risk defense and was pointed out by the court as such.

…plaintiffs signed a season-pass agreement, which included a term releasing Mammoth from liability “for any damage, injury or death . . . arising from participation in the sport or use of the facilities at Mammoth regardless of cause, including the ALLEGED NEGLIGENCE of Mammoth.” The agreement also contained a paragraph describing the sport as dangerous and involving risks “posed by loss of balance, loss of control, falling, sliding, collisions with other skiers or snowboarders and collisions with natural and man-made objects, including trees, rocks, fences, posts, lift towers, snow making equipment, snowmobiles and other over-snow vehicles.”

California courts also look at the assumption of risk issue not as a defense, but a doctrine that releases the defendant of its duty to the plaintiff.

“While often referred to as a defense, a release of future liability is more appropriately characterized as an express assumption of the risk that negates the defendant’s duty of care, an element of the plaintiff’s case.” Express assumption of risk agreements are analogous to the implied primary assumption of risk doctrine. “The result is that the defendant is relieved of legal duty to the plaintiff; and being under no duty, he cannot be charged with negligence.””

The court then is not instructed to look at the activity to see the relationship of the parties or examine the activity that caused the plaintiff’s injuries. The question becomes is the risk of injury the plaintiff suffered inherent in the activity in which the plaintiff was participating. The issue then becomes a question solely for the courts as in this case, does the scope of the release express the risk relieving the defendant of any duty to the plaintiff.

After the judge makes that decision then the question of whether or not the actions of the defendant rose to the level of gross negligence is reviewed. “The issue we must determine here is whether, with all facts and inferences construed in plaintiffs’ favor, Mammoth’s conduct could be found to constitute gross negligence.

Ordinary or simple negligence is a “failure to exercise the degree of care in a given situation that a reasonable person under similar circumstances would employ to protect others from harm.”

“‘”[M]ere nonfeasance, such as the failure to discover a dangerous condition or to perform a duty,”‘ amounts to ordinary negligence. However, to support a theory of ‘”[g]ross negligence,”‘ a plaintiff must allege facts showing ‘either a “‘”want of even scant care”‘” or “‘”an extreme departure from the ordinary standard of conduct.”‘”[G]ross negligence’ falls short of a reckless disregard of consequences, and differs from ordinary negligence only in degree, and not in kind. . . .”‘”

When looking at gross negligence, the nature of the sport comes back into the evaluation.

“‘[A] purveyor of recreational activities owes a duty to a patron not to increase the risks inherent in the activity in which the patron has paid to engage.'” Thus, in cases involving a waiver of liability for future negligence, courts have held that conduct that substantially or unreasonably increased the inherent risk of an activity or actively concealed a known risk could amount to gross negligence, which would not be barred by a release agreement.

Skiing and snowboarding have a long list of litigated risks that are inherent in the sport and thus assumed by the plaintiff or better, to which the defendant does not owe the plaintiff a duty.

There the plaintiff argued the snow groomer was not an assumed risk. The court eliminated that argument by pointing out the plaintiff had signed a release which pointed out to the plaintiff that one of the risks she could encounter was a snow groomer on the slopes.

The main problem with plaintiffs’ argument that common law has not recognized collisions with snow-grooming equipment as an inherent risk of skiing, is that plaintiffs’ season-pass agreement did. When signing their season-pass agreement, both Willhide-Michiulis and her husband acknowledged that skiing involved the risk of colliding with “over-snow vehicles.” Willhide-Michiulis testified she read the agreement but did not know an “over-snow vehicle” included a snowcat. Plaintiffs, however, did not argue in the trial court or now on appeal that this term is ambiguous or that the parties did not contemplate collisions with snowcats as a risk of snowboarding. “Over-snow vehicles” is listed in the contract along with “snow making equipment” and “snowmobiles,” indicating a clear intent to include any vehicle used by Mammoth for snow maintenance and snow travel.

The court went on to find case law that supported the defense that snow groomers were a risk of skiing and boarding, and it was a great big slow moving bright-red machine that made it generally unavoidable.

Further, the snowcat Willhide-Michiulis collided with is large, bright red, and slow-moving, making it generally avoidable by those around it. Indeed, Willhide-Michiulis testified that she saw the snowcat about 150 feet before she collided with it. Although she claims the snowcat cut off her path, the snowcat was traveling less than ten miles an hour before standing nearly motionless while turning onto Old Boneyard Road downhill from Willhide- Michiulis.

Even if there were no warning signs, nothing on the maps of the ski area, nothing in the release, once the plaintiff spotted the snowcat the responsibility to avoid the snowcat fell on her.

The appellate court upheld the trial courts motion for summary judgement in favor of the defendant ski area Mammoth Mountain.

So Now What?

The California Appellate Court took 11 pages to tell the plaintiff if you see a big red slow-moving machine on the ski slopes to stay away from it.

What is also interesting is the evolution of the law in California from a release being a contractual pre-injury agreement not to sue to proof that the defendant did not owe a duty to the plaintiff because she assumed the risk.

Besides, how do you miss, let alone ski or snowboard into a big red slow-moving machine with flashing lights and sirens on a ski slope?

What do you think? Leave a comment.

Copyright 2017 Recreation Law (720) 334 8529

If you like this let your friends know or post it on FB, Twitter or LinkedIn





If you are interested in having me write your release, fill out this Information Form and Contract and send it to me.

Author: Outdoor Recreation Insurance, Risk Management and Law

To Purchase Go Here:

Facebook Page: Outdoor Recreation & Adventure Travel Law

Email: Rec-law@recreation-law.com

By Recreation Law    Rec-law@recreation-law.com    James H. Moss

#AdventureTourism, #AdventureTravelLaw, #AdventureTravelLawyer, #AttorneyatLaw, #Backpacking, #BicyclingLaw, #Camps, #ChallengeCourse, #ChallengeCourseLaw, #ChallengeCourseLawyer, #CyclingLaw, #FitnessLaw, #FitnessLawyer, #Hiking, #HumanPowered, #HumanPoweredRecreation, #IceClimbing, #JamesHMoss, #JimMoss, #Law, #Mountaineering, #Negligence, #OutdoorLaw, #OutdoorRecreationLaw, #OutsideLaw, #OutsideLawyer, #RecLaw, #Rec-Law, #RecLawBlog, #Rec-LawBlog, #RecLawyer, #RecreationalLawyer, #RecreationLaw, #RecreationLawBlog, #RecreationLawcom, #Recreation-Lawcom, #Recreation-Law.com, #RiskManagement, #RockClimbing, #RockClimbingLawyer, #RopesCourse, #RopesCourseLawyer, #SkiAreas, #Skiing, #SkiLaw, #Snowboarding, #SummerCamp, #Tourism, #TravelLaw, #YouthCamps, #ZipLineLawyer, #RecreationLaw, #OutdoorLaw, #OutdoorRecreationLaw, #SkiLaw,


Today is World Clean Up Day, Make Sure to Do Your Part

Take four hours or at least four pieces of litter and put them in the trash.

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World CleanUp Day

is

September 15, 2018

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Have Fun with millions of Americans

on

World CleanUp Day

From Coast to Coast, organizations and individuals alike join forces to clean up our parks, trails, beaches, mountains and open spaces.

All it takes is a pair of gloves and a bag. Go to your park, river, lake, beach, street.

· Sign Up for World CleanUp Day

· Download the Flyer

· Download the APP

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Lonely Planet piece on World CleanUp Day. Dispose of at least one piece of litter/trash on Saturday. Your friends are doing it with millions of others. Don’t miss out.

https://www.lonelyplanet.com/news/2018/09/13/world-cleanup-day/

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Background piece on United States and World CleanUp Day. In the US, we are holding the annual National CleanUp Day in conjunction with World CleanUp Day.

https://www.theepochtimes.com/hiking-friends-inspire-thousands-to-clean-up-the-trails_2657094.html

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2018 Partners
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Keep America Beautiful

620 Affiliate Locations

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Earth Day

Earth Day Network

EarthX

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Name: World CleanUp Day

Date: September 15, 2018

All Day, Everywhere

Sign up to volunteer

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National CleanUp Day was created by Clean Trails, a US based 501(c)3 non-profit. National CleanUp Day was officially proclaimed in mid-2017 and our inaugural event was held on September 16, 2017. We partnered with many Keep America Beautiful affiliates, companies and individuals with a total of 225,000 participants.

For 2018, we have partnered with Keep America Beautiful nationally and most affiliates are holding a cleanup on September 15, 2018. We just partnered with the Ocean Conservancy and Earth Day for 2018 and expect to have more than one million volunteers from around the country.

Also in 2018, we have partnered with Let’s Do It World who is hosting the first ever World CleanUp Day. 150 Countries and millions of participants.

2019 will expand our partnerships and outreach significantly and our goal is 5 million participants.

Thank you for all you do to make the world a better place!

Sincerely,

Steve Jewett

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We Did it!
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National Clean Up Day is September 15!

New volunteer opportunity – From Sea to Shining Sea

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National CleanUp Day

is

September 15, 2018

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Have Fun

on

National CleanUp Day

From Coast to Coast, organizations and individuals alike join forces to clean up our parks, trails, beaches, mountains and open spaces.

All it takes is a pair of gloves and a bag. Go to your park, river, lake, beach, street.

· Sign Up at NationalCleanUpDay.org

· Download the Flyer

· Download the APP

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2018 Partners
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Keep America Beautiful

620 Affiliate Locations

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Earth Day

Earth Day Network

EarthX

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Name: National CleanUp Day

Date: September 15, 2018

All Day

Sign up to volunteer
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National CleanUp Day was created by Clean Trails, a US based 501(c)3 non-profit. National CleanUp Day was officially proclaimed in mid-2017 and our inaugural event was held on September 16, 2017. We partnered with many Keep America Beautiful affiliates, companies and individuals with a total of 225,000 participants.

For 2018, we have partnered with Keep America Beautiful nationally and most affiliates are holding a cleanup on September 15, 2018. We just partnered with the Ocean Conservancy and Earth Day for 2018 and expect to have more than one million volunteers from around the country.

Also in 2018, we have partnered with Let’s Do It World who is hosting the first ever World CleanUp Day. 150 Countries and millions of participants.

2019 will expand our partnerships and outreach significantly and our goal is 5 million participants.

Thank you for all you do to make the world a better place!

Sincerely,

Steve Jewett

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We Did it!
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Clean Trails, LLC | National CleanUp Day, World CleanUp Day, Evergreen, CO 80439
@CleanTrails#RecLaw #RecreationLaw #OutdoorLaw #OutdoorRecreationLaw #OutdoorIndustry #ORLawTextbook

It’s getting to that time of you, Donate and Sign Up to the Colorado Avalanche Information Center

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SEPTEMBER 2018 ISSUE |Looking back
The monthly dump is back for the 2018 – 2019 season! We could not be more excited for the upcoming winter season. But first, let’s take a look back at how last season shaped up and the events we have to kick off this fall.
2017-2018 Season Review
The 2017-18 avalanche season in Colorado was characterized by a stark north-south gradient in total snowfall, and warm, wet storms punctuating prolonged dry spells. In portions of the Central and Southern Mountains, it was one of the driest winters in the last 40 years. Our Northern Mountains fared better, with some areas quietly sneaking in a decent season with near or even slightly above median annual snowfall. Rain as high as 12,000 feet and several dust events made many us of wonder how winter might look in the future.

There were approximately 2200 avalanches reported to the Colorado Avalanche Information Center (CAIC). CAIC documented 35 incidents, with 45 people caught and three killed – less than the 10-year mean of six fatalities per season. The numbers are likely affected by a shortened snowpack season, particularly in our Southern Mountains, that had long stretches with little avalanche hazard due to poor snow coverage.

An early October storm dropped enough snow at higher elevations to persist through a pronounced fall/early 12de65a6-ef64-465b-97da-07a339ae0f8a.jpgwinter drought. A thick foundation of depth hoar developed across much of the state. This layer plagued us for the remainder of the season. We received four “storms” during this drought period with very little snow accumulating prior to Thanksgiving. Each of these storms was followed by extended dry periods of at least a week. Our first close call occurred right after one of these modest loading events on November 18, when a snowboarder near Aspen was caught, carried, and partially buried. Fortunately, he walked away with no major injuries.

The longest period without significant snowfall was from November 18 to just before Christmas. During this five-week dry spell, the snowpack around the state dropped to less than 75% of long-term median, with some areas in the Central and Southern Mountains in the single digits. A “Christmas storm” finally brought snow we could measure in feet. Our snowpack did not handle this test well, and we saw our first, and in hindsight, most widespread avalanche cycle of the season. This pattern – mid to late-month storms interrupting dry periods and leading to avalanche cycles – continued into April. The avalanches in each cycle failed on the facet layer that developed during the early-season drought

The first fatality of the season occurred right after the mid-January storm in the San Juan Mountains near Silverton. Two backcountry skiers were caught and partially buried after venturing into terrain they planned to avoid. One did not survive.

February was the snowiest month of the season for the entire state, accounting for a large percentage of snowfall for the entire season. In some locations in the Southern Mountains, February snowfall amounted to around half of the season’s snowfall. Not surprisingly, we also had a lot of associated avalanche activity, and 6bc68772-ea3a-4929-9ee2-6181cc2ef830.jpga little over one third of all avalanche incidents occurred during this one month. The month’s incidents include a solo skier near Berthoud Pass who was caught, carried, and sustained injuries, and a skier near Vail Pass who was partially buried and suffered serious injuries requiring hospitalization.

Mid-February storms produced a remarkably sustained cycle of large and very large avalanches, with D2.5 or larger slides nearly every day for over a week in some locations. The cycle left many professionals searching their memories to recall such a long-lived cycle of avalanches breaking to the ground with very small loads or even just a minor uptick in wind transport.

March was mostly warm and dry. Warm, spring-time temperatures brought a few days of small wet avalanches throughout March, but we didn’t get a pronounced Wet Slab avalanche cycle until later in the season. Storms in the latter half of the month brought rain to 11,000 ft. We had several close calls during the month, but entered April with hopes of finishing the season with only one tragic avalanche fatality.

It was not to be. One of the season’s largest storms arrived on April 6, delivering ample heavy, wet snow over the next three days. Snow-water-equivalent was up to 4 inches of water with 2 to 3 feet of snow in the favored locations. We observed rain close to 12,000 feet at the tail end of the storm. This was an unusual 3d5c6435-0395-4d04-b2ae-a8224207926f.jpgevent, and two fatalities occurred in the three-day period right after the storm lifted. On closing day for Aspen Highlands (April 8), a member of the local Search and Rescue group was caught, carried, and killed in the backcountry adjacent to the ski area. An avalanche warning was in effect at the time of accident. On April 10, snowmobilers near Breckenridge triggered an avalanche that broke on the early-season, basal facets. The victim was fully buried and killed. He was wearing a beacon, but it was not turned on. It was sobering to enter the final stretches of the season with two more tragic accidents, each of which has take-home lessons that are too familiar. A number of Wet Slab avalanches followed later in April and into May.

On the education front, the CAIC and Friends of CAIC continued the Know Before You Go program statewide. Combined with our other educational programs, CAIC staff and trained instructors across the state conducted around 150 education events and reached approximately 6300 students. We look forward to improving and expanding these programs for next season.

Lastly – Thank you for your past support and in advance for your continued support. Together we can achieve our strategic goals and continue to build the best avalanche forecast center Colorado has ever seen.

Upcoming Events
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Mountain Meteorology Workshop

Tuesday – Thursday, Sept. 11-13
Colorado Mountain College, Leadville
Click here to learn more and purchase your ticket.

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Bentgate’s Ski Season Kickoff Party

Thursday, Oct. 4
American Mountaineering Center, Golden
Click hereto learn more and purchase your ticket.

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Colorado Snow & Avalanche Workshop

Friday, October 5
Riverwalk Center, Breckenridge
Click hereto learn more and purchase your ticket.

Want to give back?
Consider donating to Friends of CAIC! Your gift supports CAIC’s backcountry forecasting program and avalanche education throughout Colorado. Help us help you stay safe.
Donate Now
Copyright © 2018 Friends of Colorado Avalanche Information Center, All rights reserved.

Our mailing address
Friends of CAIC
PO BOX 267
Grand Junction, CO 81502

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@CAICfrontrange @COAvalancheInfo @ColoradoSkiUSA @CAICaspen @friendsofCAIC @CAICsthsanjuan @CAICsthsanjuan @CAICsangrecrist @CAICgunnison @CAICgrandmesa @CAICnthsanjuan @CAICsawatch @CAICsummit

#SkiLaw #SkiAreaLaw #RecLaw #RecreationLaw #OutdoorLaw #ORLawTextbook