Do Releases Work? Should I be using a Release in my Business? Will my customers be upset if I make them sign a release?

These and many other questions are answered in my book Outdoor Recreation Risk Management, Insurance and Law.

Releases, (or as some people incorrectly call them waivers) are a legal agreement that in advance of any possible injury identifies who will pay for what. Releases can and to stop lawsuits.

This book will explain releases and other defenses you can use to put yourself in a position to stop lawsuits and claims.

This book can help you understand why people sue and how you can and should deal with injured, angry or upset guests of your business.

This book is designed to help you rest easy about what you need to do and how to do it. More importantly, this book will make sure you keep your business afloat and moving forward.

You did not get into the outdoor recreation business to worry or spend nights staying awake. Get prepared and learn how and why so you can sleep and quit worrying.

                                              Table of Contents

Chapter 1    Outdoor Recreation Risk Management, Law, and Insurance: An Overview

Chapter 2    U.S. Legal System and Legal Research

Chapter 3    Risk 25

Chapter 4    Risk, Accidents, and Litigation: Why People Sue

Chapter 5    Law 57

Chapter 6    Statutes that Affect Outdoor Recreation

Chapter 7    Pre-injury Contracts to Prevent Litigation: Releases

Chapter 8    Defenses to Claims

Chapter 9    Minors

Chapter 10    Skiing and Ski Areas

Chapter 11    Other Commercial Recreational Activities

Chapter 12    Water Sports, Paddlesports, and water-based activities

Chapter 13    Rental Programs

Chapter 14    Insurance

         $99.00 plus shipping

 

 

 

 

Artwork by Don Long donaldoelong@earthlink.net

 


Can’t Sleep? Guest was injured, and you don’t know what to do? This book can answer those questions for you.

An injured guest is everyone’s business owner’s nightmare. What happened, how do you make sure it does not happen again, what can you do to help the guest, can you help the guests are just some of the questions that might be keeping you up at night.

This book can help you understand why people sue and how you can and should deal with injured, angry or upset guests of your business.

This book is designed to help you rest easy about what you need to do and how to do it. More importantly, this book will make sure you keep your business afloat and moving forward.

You did not get into the outdoor recreation business to worry or spend nights staying awake. Get prepared and learn how and why so you can sleep and quit worrying.

                                      Table of Contents

Chapter 1    Outdoor Recreation Risk Management, Law, and Insurance: An Overview

Chapter 2    U.S. Legal System and Legal Research

Chapter 3    Risk 25

Chapter 4    Risk, Accidents, and Litigation: Why People Sue

Chapter 5    Law 57

Chapter 6    Statutes that Affect Outdoor Recreation

Chapter 7    Pre-injury Contracts to Prevent Litigation: Releases

Chapter 8    Defenses to Claims

Chapter 9    Minors

Chapter 10    Skiing and Ski Areas

Chapter 11    Other Commercial Recreational Activities

Chapter 12    Water Sports, Paddlesports, and water-based activities

Chapter 13    Rental Programs

Chapter 14    Insurance

             $99.00 plus shipping


What is a Risk Management Plan and What do You Need in Yours?

Everyone has told you, you need a risk management plan. A plan to follow if you have a crisis. You‘ve seen several and they look burdensome and difficult to write. Need help writing a risk management plan? Need to know what should be in your risk management plan? Need Help?

This book can help you understand and write your plan. This book is designed to help you rest easy about what you need to do and how to do it. More importantly, this book will make sure you plan is a workable plan, not one that will create liability for you.

 

                                             Table of Contents

Chapter 1    Outdoor Recreation Risk Management, Law, and Insurance: An Overview

Chapter 2    U.S. Legal System and Legal Research

Chapter 3    Risk 25

Chapter 4    Risk, Accidents, and Litigation: Why People Sue

Chapter 5    Law 57

Chapter 6    Statutes that Affect Outdoor Recreation

Chapter 7    PreInjury Contracts to Prevent Litigation: Releases

Chapter 8    Defenses to Claims

Chapter 9    Minors

Chapter 10    Skiing and Ski Areas

Chapter 11    Other Commercial Recreational Activities

Chapter 12    Water Sports, Paddlesports, and water-based activities

Chapter 13    Rental Programs

Chapter 14    Insurance

               $99.00 plus shipping


Need a Handy Reference Guide to Understand your Insurance Policy?

This book should be on every outfitter and guide’s desk. It will answer your questions, help you sleep at night, help you answer your guests’ questions and allow you to run your business with less worry.

Table of Contents

Chapter 1    Outdoor Recreation Risk Management, Law, and Insurance: An Overview

Chapter 2    U.S. Legal System and Legal Research

Chapter 3    Risk 25

Chapter 4    Risk, Accidents, and Litigation: Why People Sue

Chapter 5    Law 57

Chapter 6    Statutes that Affect Outdoor Recreation

Chapter 7    PreInjury Contracts to Prevent Litigation: Releases

Chapter 8    Defenses to Claims

Chapter 9    Minors

Chapter 10    Skiing and Ski Areas

Chapter 11    Other Commercial Recreational Activities

Chapter 12    Water Sports, Paddlesports, and water-based activities

Chapter 13    Rental Programs

Chapter 14    Insurance

             $99.00 plus shipping


Tickets for CSAW go up in Price Sunday, Attend this Avalanche Workshop Sign Up and Learn

Now is the time to purchase your $25 ticket for CSAW. Ticket price increases to $40 on Sunday.
WHY ATTEND CSAW?

The Colorado Snow and Avalanche Workshop is a one-day professional development seminar for people working and recreating in and around avalanche terrain. It provides a venue to listen to presentations and discuss new ideas, techniques and technologies in avalanche research and field work.

The 2018 Colorado Snow and Avalanche Workshop will feature a diverse set of speakers covering topics from the effects of climate change on our snowpack to the history of the Colorado Department of Transportation avalanche mitigation program.

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE & PURCHASE YOUR TICKET

Whether you are a ski patroller, avalanche forecaster, road maintenance personnel, ski guide, avalanche educator, student, applied researcher, or backcountry user, we hope you can join us!

Want to give back?
Consider donating to Friends of CAIC! Your gift supports CAIC’s backcountry forecasting program and avalanche education throughout Colorado.
Donate Now
@FriendsofCAIC @COAvalancheInfo @ColoradoSkiUSA @CAICfrontrange @CAICaspen @CAICsthsanjuan @CAICsthsanjuan @CAICsangrecrist @CAICgunnison @CAICgrandmesa @CAICnthsanjuan @CAICsawatch @CAICsummit

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It’s getting to that time of you, Donate and Sign Up to the Colorado Avalanche Information Center

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SEPTEMBER 2018 ISSUE |Looking back
The monthly dump is back for the 2018 – 2019 season! We could not be more excited for the upcoming winter season. But first, let’s take a look back at how last season shaped up and the events we have to kick off this fall.
2017-2018 Season Review
The 2017-18 avalanche season in Colorado was characterized by a stark north-south gradient in total snowfall, and warm, wet storms punctuating prolonged dry spells. In portions of the Central and Southern Mountains, it was one of the driest winters in the last 40 years. Our Northern Mountains fared better, with some areas quietly sneaking in a decent season with near or even slightly above median annual snowfall. Rain as high as 12,000 feet and several dust events made many us of wonder how winter might look in the future.

There were approximately 2200 avalanches reported to the Colorado Avalanche Information Center (CAIC). CAIC documented 35 incidents, with 45 people caught and three killed – less than the 10-year mean of six fatalities per season. The numbers are likely affected by a shortened snowpack season, particularly in our Southern Mountains, that had long stretches with little avalanche hazard due to poor snow coverage.

An early October storm dropped enough snow at higher elevations to persist through a pronounced fall/early 12de65a6-ef64-465b-97da-07a339ae0f8a.jpgwinter drought. A thick foundation of depth hoar developed across much of the state. This layer plagued us for the remainder of the season. We received four “storms” during this drought period with very little snow accumulating prior to Thanksgiving. Each of these storms was followed by extended dry periods of at least a week. Our first close call occurred right after one of these modest loading events on November 18, when a snowboarder near Aspen was caught, carried, and partially buried. Fortunately, he walked away with no major injuries.

The longest period without significant snowfall was from November 18 to just before Christmas. During this five-week dry spell, the snowpack around the state dropped to less than 75% of long-term median, with some areas in the Central and Southern Mountains in the single digits. A “Christmas storm” finally brought snow we could measure in feet. Our snowpack did not handle this test well, and we saw our first, and in hindsight, most widespread avalanche cycle of the season. This pattern – mid to late-month storms interrupting dry periods and leading to avalanche cycles – continued into April. The avalanches in each cycle failed on the facet layer that developed during the early-season drought

The first fatality of the season occurred right after the mid-January storm in the San Juan Mountains near Silverton. Two backcountry skiers were caught and partially buried after venturing into terrain they planned to avoid. One did not survive.

February was the snowiest month of the season for the entire state, accounting for a large percentage of snowfall for the entire season. In some locations in the Southern Mountains, February snowfall amounted to around half of the season’s snowfall. Not surprisingly, we also had a lot of associated avalanche activity, and 6bc68772-ea3a-4929-9ee2-6181cc2ef830.jpga little over one third of all avalanche incidents occurred during this one month. The month’s incidents include a solo skier near Berthoud Pass who was caught, carried, and sustained injuries, and a skier near Vail Pass who was partially buried and suffered serious injuries requiring hospitalization.

Mid-February storms produced a remarkably sustained cycle of large and very large avalanches, with D2.5 or larger slides nearly every day for over a week in some locations. The cycle left many professionals searching their memories to recall such a long-lived cycle of avalanches breaking to the ground with very small loads or even just a minor uptick in wind transport.

March was mostly warm and dry. Warm, spring-time temperatures brought a few days of small wet avalanches throughout March, but we didn’t get a pronounced Wet Slab avalanche cycle until later in the season. Storms in the latter half of the month brought rain to 11,000 ft. We had several close calls during the month, but entered April with hopes of finishing the season with only one tragic avalanche fatality.

It was not to be. One of the season’s largest storms arrived on April 6, delivering ample heavy, wet snow over the next three days. Snow-water-equivalent was up to 4 inches of water with 2 to 3 feet of snow in the favored locations. We observed rain close to 12,000 feet at the tail end of the storm. This was an unusual 3d5c6435-0395-4d04-b2ae-a8224207926f.jpgevent, and two fatalities occurred in the three-day period right after the storm lifted. On closing day for Aspen Highlands (April 8), a member of the local Search and Rescue group was caught, carried, and killed in the backcountry adjacent to the ski area. An avalanche warning was in effect at the time of accident. On April 10, snowmobilers near Breckenridge triggered an avalanche that broke on the early-season, basal facets. The victim was fully buried and killed. He was wearing a beacon, but it was not turned on. It was sobering to enter the final stretches of the season with two more tragic accidents, each of which has take-home lessons that are too familiar. A number of Wet Slab avalanches followed later in April and into May.

On the education front, the CAIC and Friends of CAIC continued the Know Before You Go program statewide. Combined with our other educational programs, CAIC staff and trained instructors across the state conducted around 150 education events and reached approximately 6300 students. We look forward to improving and expanding these programs for next season.

Lastly – Thank you for your past support and in advance for your continued support. Together we can achieve our strategic goals and continue to build the best avalanche forecast center Colorado has ever seen.

Upcoming Events
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Mountain Meteorology Workshop

Tuesday – Thursday, Sept. 11-13
Colorado Mountain College, Leadville
Click here to learn more and purchase your ticket.

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Bentgate’s Ski Season Kickoff Party

Thursday, Oct. 4
American Mountaineering Center, Golden
Click hereto learn more and purchase your ticket.

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Colorado Snow & Avalanche Workshop

Friday, October 5
Riverwalk Center, Breckenridge
Click hereto learn more and purchase your ticket.

Want to give back?
Consider donating to Friends of CAIC! Your gift supports CAIC’s backcountry forecasting program and avalanche education throughout Colorado. Help us help you stay safe.
Donate Now
Copyright © 2018 Friends of Colorado Avalanche Information Center, All rights reserved.

Our mailing address
Friends of CAIC
PO BOX 267
Grand Junction, CO 81502

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@CAICfrontrange @COAvalancheInfo @ColoradoSkiUSA @CAICaspen @friendsofCAIC @CAICsthsanjuan @CAICsthsanjuan @CAICsangrecrist @CAICgunnison @CAICgrandmesa @CAICnthsanjuan @CAICsawatch @CAICsummit

#SkiLaw #SkiAreaLaw #RecLaw #RecreationLaw #OutdoorLaw #ORLawTextbook


American Avalanche Association is offering 2 Scholarships to the International Snow Science in Austria

 

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August 20, 2018

A3 is pleased to announce the availability of two scholarships for A3 Members to attend the ISSW this October, 2018 in Innsbruck, Austria. Each scholarship will include conference registration and a $500 stipend to defray travel expenses.

Details:

  • One scholarship will be awarded to a student, and the other to a practitioner. Please note that one must apply as either a student or a practitioner, but not both.
  • Interested parties should submit a 250-500 word essay explaining how they would put the scholarship to good use.
  • A3 President John Stimberis will select the winners in consultation with the A3 board.
  • Scholarship recipients will be required to either write an article for The Avalanche Review or make a presentation at an A3 supported Snow and Avalanche Workshop. Recipients will be strongly encouraged to provide at least 2 social media posts during the conference.

Dates and Deadlines:

  • Interested parties should submit their essays to Dan Kaveney at dan by August 29, 2018 at 5 PM MDT.
  • Recipients will be notified by September 5, 2018.

Thanks to our major sponsors for making ISSW Sponsorship and this scholarship possible.

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P.O. Box 7019 * Bozeman, MT 59771 * Phone: (307) 264-5924

aaa * www.americanavalancheassociation.org

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