Tickets for CSAW go up in Price Sunday, Attend this Avalanche Workshop Sign Up and Learn

Now is the time to purchase your $25 ticket for CSAW. Ticket price increases to $40 on Sunday.
WHY ATTEND CSAW?

The Colorado Snow and Avalanche Workshop is a one-day professional development seminar for people working and recreating in and around avalanche terrain. It provides a venue to listen to presentations and discuss new ideas, techniques and technologies in avalanche research and field work.

The 2018 Colorado Snow and Avalanche Workshop will feature a diverse set of speakers covering topics from the effects of climate change on our snowpack to the history of the Colorado Department of Transportation avalanche mitigation program.

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE & PURCHASE YOUR TICKET

Whether you are a ski patroller, avalanche forecaster, road maintenance personnel, ski guide, avalanche educator, student, applied researcher, or backcountry user, we hope you can join us!

Want to give back?
Consider donating to Friends of CAIC! Your gift supports CAIC’s backcountry forecasting program and avalanche education throughout Colorado.
Donate Now
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SEPTEMBER 2018 ISSUE |Looking back
The monthly dump is back for the 2018 – 2019 season! We could not be more excited for the upcoming winter season. But first, let’s take a look back at how last season shaped up and the events we have to kick off this fall.
2017-2018 Season Review
The 2017-18 avalanche season in Colorado was characterized by a stark north-south gradient in total snowfall, and warm, wet storms punctuating prolonged dry spells. In portions of the Central and Southern Mountains, it was one of the driest winters in the last 40 years. Our Northern Mountains fared better, with some areas quietly sneaking in a decent season with near or even slightly above median annual snowfall. Rain as high as 12,000 feet and several dust events made many us of wonder how winter might look in the future.

There were approximately 2200 avalanches reported to the Colorado Avalanche Information Center (CAIC). CAIC documented 35 incidents, with 45 people caught and three killed – less than the 10-year mean of six fatalities per season. The numbers are likely affected by a shortened snowpack season, particularly in our Southern Mountains, that had long stretches with little avalanche hazard due to poor snow coverage.

An early October storm dropped enough snow at higher elevations to persist through a pronounced fall/early 12de65a6-ef64-465b-97da-07a339ae0f8a.jpgwinter drought. A thick foundation of depth hoar developed across much of the state. This layer plagued us for the remainder of the season. We received four “storms” during this drought period with very little snow accumulating prior to Thanksgiving. Each of these storms was followed by extended dry periods of at least a week. Our first close call occurred right after one of these modest loading events on November 18, when a snowboarder near Aspen was caught, carried, and partially buried. Fortunately, he walked away with no major injuries.

The longest period without significant snowfall was from November 18 to just before Christmas. During this five-week dry spell, the snowpack around the state dropped to less than 75% of long-term median, with some areas in the Central and Southern Mountains in the single digits. A “Christmas storm” finally brought snow we could measure in feet. Our snowpack did not handle this test well, and we saw our first, and in hindsight, most widespread avalanche cycle of the season. This pattern – mid to late-month storms interrupting dry periods and leading to avalanche cycles – continued into April. The avalanches in each cycle failed on the facet layer that developed during the early-season drought

The first fatality of the season occurred right after the mid-January storm in the San Juan Mountains near Silverton. Two backcountry skiers were caught and partially buried after venturing into terrain they planned to avoid. One did not survive.

February was the snowiest month of the season for the entire state, accounting for a large percentage of snowfall for the entire season. In some locations in the Southern Mountains, February snowfall amounted to around half of the season’s snowfall. Not surprisingly, we also had a lot of associated avalanche activity, and 6bc68772-ea3a-4929-9ee2-6181cc2ef830.jpga little over one third of all avalanche incidents occurred during this one month. The month’s incidents include a solo skier near Berthoud Pass who was caught, carried, and sustained injuries, and a skier near Vail Pass who was partially buried and suffered serious injuries requiring hospitalization.

Mid-February storms produced a remarkably sustained cycle of large and very large avalanches, with D2.5 or larger slides nearly every day for over a week in some locations. The cycle left many professionals searching their memories to recall such a long-lived cycle of avalanches breaking to the ground with very small loads or even just a minor uptick in wind transport.

March was mostly warm and dry. Warm, spring-time temperatures brought a few days of small wet avalanches throughout March, but we didn’t get a pronounced Wet Slab avalanche cycle until later in the season. Storms in the latter half of the month brought rain to 11,000 ft. We had several close calls during the month, but entered April with hopes of finishing the season with only one tragic avalanche fatality.

It was not to be. One of the season’s largest storms arrived on April 6, delivering ample heavy, wet snow over the next three days. Snow-water-equivalent was up to 4 inches of water with 2 to 3 feet of snow in the favored locations. We observed rain close to 12,000 feet at the tail end of the storm. This was an unusual 3d5c6435-0395-4d04-b2ae-a8224207926f.jpgevent, and two fatalities occurred in the three-day period right after the storm lifted. On closing day for Aspen Highlands (April 8), a member of the local Search and Rescue group was caught, carried, and killed in the backcountry adjacent to the ski area. An avalanche warning was in effect at the time of accident. On April 10, snowmobilers near Breckenridge triggered an avalanche that broke on the early-season, basal facets. The victim was fully buried and killed. He was wearing a beacon, but it was not turned on. It was sobering to enter the final stretches of the season with two more tragic accidents, each of which has take-home lessons that are too familiar. A number of Wet Slab avalanches followed later in April and into May.

On the education front, the CAIC and Friends of CAIC continued the Know Before You Go program statewide. Combined with our other educational programs, CAIC staff and trained instructors across the state conducted around 150 education events and reached approximately 6300 students. We look forward to improving and expanding these programs for next season.

Lastly – Thank you for your past support and in advance for your continued support. Together we can achieve our strategic goals and continue to build the best avalanche forecast center Colorado has ever seen.

Upcoming Events
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Mountain Meteorology Workshop

Tuesday – Thursday, Sept. 11-13
Colorado Mountain College, Leadville
Click here to learn more and purchase your ticket.

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Bentgate’s Ski Season Kickoff Party

Thursday, Oct. 4
American Mountaineering Center, Golden
Click hereto learn more and purchase your ticket.

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Colorado Snow & Avalanche Workshop

Friday, October 5
Riverwalk Center, Breckenridge
Click hereto learn more and purchase your ticket.

Want to give back?
Consider donating to Friends of CAIC! Your gift supports CAIC’s backcountry forecasting program and avalanche education throughout Colorado. Help us help you stay safe.
Donate Now
Copyright © 2018 Friends of Colorado Avalanche Information Center, All rights reserved.

Our mailing address
Friends of CAIC
PO BOX 267
Grand Junction, CO 81502

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@CAICfrontrange @COAvalancheInfo @ColoradoSkiUSA @CAICaspen @friendsofCAIC @CAICsthsanjuan @CAICsthsanjuan @CAICsangrecrist @CAICgunnison @CAICgrandmesa @CAICnthsanjuan @CAICsawatch @CAICsummit

#SkiLaw #SkiAreaLaw #RecLaw #RecreationLaw #OutdoorLaw #ORLawTextbook


Colorado Snowpack is Extremely Dangerous and getting Worse

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FEBRUARY 2018 ISSUE |Large & Dangerous
We Have a Deep Problem
After a dry start to the winter, the snowpack in the Colorado mountains is rapidly increasing. The increase in snow over the last few weeks is building a thick slab on top of a weak foundation. This weak layer of snow that sits near the ground has been producing avalanches for most of the winter. With a thicker slab, the avalanches are now much larger. Avalanches are breaking at the ground and are hundreds, sometimes more than a thousand, feet wide. If you get caught, it will be hard to survive.

These are very large Persistent and Deep Persistent Slab avalanches. These types of avalanches are especially dangerous as you may not see the usual signs of unstable snow that you rely on: shooting cracks, rumbling collapses or recent avalanches. The only way to stay safe from these avalanches is to avoid terrain over 30 degrees in the areas that can produce these types of destructive avalanches. The snowpack this winter is unlike the past few winters. The steep slope that you rode safely last season or last month, may now be dangerous.

This is an important time to take a step back and carefully consider the terrain you want to ride. These conditions could last for the rest of the winter. Many of the big avalanche paths that you see in Colorado were formed during avalanche years like this one. Watch the video below and share with your friends. Always get the forecast before you head into the backcountry.

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Cheers to CAIC with Coffee!
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There is nothing better than a hot cup of coffee before, during and after your backcountry ventures! Bivouac Coffee is our official coffee partner for the 2017-2018 season! When you purchase their delicious coffee beans you are directly supporting your avalanche center.

10% of all Bivouac Coffee purchases support avalanche awareness and forecasting throughout Colorado.

Let’s cheers to that! Visit Bivouac Coffee’s website today.

Upcoming Events
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Down for Change!

Sunday, March 4
Breckenridge Ski Resort
How many vertical feet can you ski or ride in a day? Take part in this competition and benefit CAIC while doing it! Learn more by clicking here.

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On-Snow Pop Up!

Saturday, March 3
Location TBD
Join Friends of CAIC and Bivouac Coffee at one of the popular backcountry trailheads along I-70 for some coffee, swag and more. Check back in soon for more information!

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WP Beers & Cheers

Sunday, March 18
Hideaway Park Brewery, Winter Park
Coming at you, Winter Park! Join us for beers and cheers in support of your avalanche center. Check back in soon for more information!

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Party for a Purpose

Saturday, March 24
Highlands Alehouse, Aspen
Mark your calendars, Aspen! The party you love is back thanks to Strafe Outerwear. Check back in soon for more information!

Featured Follower
Tag us for a chance to be featured!
@friendsofcaic | #friendsofcaic
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“Breaking on through to the weekend. Plenty of new snow and hidden dangers in the backcountry so be safe. Know b4 you go!”
– JJ, @peter_deepinpow
Want to Give Back?
Whether you use the CAIC forecasts every day or once a year, please consider making a donation to support avalanche forecasting and education in Colorado. A donation of even $10 helps us continue to improve our programs. Please donate today and support your avalanche center.
Donate Now
Copyright © 2017 Friends of Colorado Avalanche Information Center, All rights reserved.

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CAIC Benefit Bash raised over $100K, save the date for 2018 December 1, 2018

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DECEMBER 2017 ISSUE |What a Bash!
Decade Deep : A Recap
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The 10th Annual CAIC Benefit Bash raised $118,640.99 for avalanche forecasting and education in Colorado!

What a Bash. This event would not have been possible without the 125 incredibly generous sponsors, 70 hard working volunteers, 6 breweries that donated delicious beer, and the Summit County restaurant community that fed all1,200 of us. We are especially thankful for all of you that joined us and helped us break our fundraising record once again. To view photos from the party, click here for our Facebook photo album. Photos provided by the talented Rebecca Wissman.

SAVE THIS DATE:
Saturday, December 1st, 2018
11th Annual CAIC Benefit Bash
“Up to 11”
Riverwalk Center, Breckenridge

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Friends of CAIC Launch Version 2 of the CAIC Mobile App!

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We are proud to announce that we have launched version 2 of our mobile app for both Android and Apple devices. We could not have done this without our partnership with The North Face.The mobile app project aligns directly with our effort to make the avalanche forecasts easily accessible across a variety of platforms. Version 2 of the mobile app optimizes the daily zone avalanche forecasts for all 10 zones across Colorado. Our focus for version 2 was an updated user interface that provided a cleaner path to the avalanche forecast, danger ratings, and zone weather tables.

Our partnership with The North Face merges technology with a common goal to provide avalanche information to our incredible community of backcountry users. We are excited to continually update the app to provide additional resources and tools.

Download the latest version here:
Android
Apple

2017 Annual Report
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Over the past year the Friends of CAIC and CAIC have made great strides in building the best avalanche center possible.

Your donations continue to drive and improve our programs for backcountry forecasting and education throughout Colorado. You can see more in our FY2017 Annual Report by clicking here.

Want to give back?
Whether you use the CAIC forecasts every day or once a year, please consider making a year-end donation to support avalanche forecasting and education in Colorado. A donation of even $25 helps us continue to improve our programs. Please donate today and support your avalanche center.
Donate Now
Upcoming Events
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Backcountry Brains

Sunday, January 7
Grab your smartest friends and join Friends of CAIC and Breckenridge Distillery for an apres snow trivia party! Learn more by clicking here.

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Monarch Backcountry Day

Saturday, January 13
Mark your calendars for what will be a fun backcountry awareness and demo day at Monarch! More information coming soon.

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BV Backcountry Day

Saturday, January 21
The Trailhead, Buena Vista
Demos of ALL KINDS: Skis, splitboards, cross-country, snowshoes, fat bikes…plus a killer after-party. All proceeds benefit the CAIC. Learn more by clicking here.

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16th Annual Beacon Bowl

Saturday, February 3
Arapahoe Basin Ski Area
It’s back! Beacon search competitions, avy search dogs, apres party – what more can you ask for? Learn more by clicking here.

Featured Follower
Tag us for a chance to be featured!
@friendsofcaic | #friendsofcaic
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“Epic weekend in the mountains with Backcountry Babes and some new adventure-loving friends for my AIARE 1. We learned about avalanche safety, following our intuition, companion rescue, the mechanics of snowpack, and so much more! Can’t wait to continue learning and practicing these skills in the mountains this winter!”
– Kim Allen, @kimexplorescolorado

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2 People have already died in Avalanches this Year. Sign up and Support the Colorado Avalanche Information Center

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Backcountry Avalanche Forecast
Front Range

danger

Summary

We continue to receive reports of avalanches breaking into old, weak snow. Combine this with widespread shooting cracks and large thunderous collapses, and we have plenty of good evidence that dangerous avalanche conditions exist on north and east-facing slopes at higher elevations. The most suspect slopes now have freshly form wind-drifted slabs from the 1 to 4 inches of new snowfall, stacked on top of older early season snow. The slopes with the best coverage are also the slopes where you’re most likely to trigger an avalanche. You can trigger avalanches from a distance and from below, so give this terrain a wide buffer to address the unpredictability.

we now have slabs 1 to 2 feet thick on east-facing slopes, and you might be able to trigger an avalanches in just the freshly drifted snow even in areas that don’t harbor more deeply buried weak layers. Drum-like or hollow sounds underfoot are signs of this problem. You can reduce your risk by avoiding slopes where you observe active wind loading.

Persistent Slab

problem_1

What You Need to Know About These Avalanches Persistent Slab avalanches can be triggered days to weeks after the last storm. They often propagate across and beyond terrain features that would otherwise confine Wind and Storm Slab avalanches. In some cases they can be triggered remotely, from low-angle terrain or adjacent slopes. Give yourself a wide safety buffer to address the uncertainty.

Wind Slab

problem_2

What You Need to Know About These Avalanches Wind Slab avalanches release naturally during wind events and can be triggered for up to a week after a wind event. They form in lee and cross-loaded terrain features. Avoid them by sticking to wind sheltered or wind scoured areas.

Weather Forecast for 11,000ft

Issued Wednesday, November 22, 2017 at 6:33 AM by Brian Lazar

Wednesday Wednesday Night Thursday
Temperature (ºF) 35 to 40 25 to 30 40 to 45
Wind Speed (mph) 15 to 25 15 to 25 15-25 G50
Wind Direction WNW WNW WNW
Sky Cover Mostly Cloudy Partly Cloudy Partly Cloudy
Snow (in) 0 to 1 0 0

© 2008-2014 Colorado Avalanche Information Center. All rights reserved.


Colorado Avalanche Information Center has a new Monthly Email, sign up now

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AUGUST 2017 ISSUE |Winter is coming…
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Winter is coming and our 2017-2018 season is going to be big. See below for exciting updates, upcoming events and more.
First thing’s first…
You’re probably wondering, ‘How did I get on this email list?‘ We are emailing you because you have been a loyal supporter of Friends of CAIC. You have either donated to us, attended our events, or are just awesome.

We are excited to bring you ‘The Monthly Dump‘, a seasonal monthly email that will highlight what is happening around the state. We will promote our events, feature avalanche problems and weather patterns, and keep you in the know. This first issue is simple — as winter approaches, more content will be shared here.

Upcoming Events
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Bentgate’s Ski Season Kickoff Party

Thursday, Sept. 21
American Mountaineering Center, Golden
Click here to learn more and purchase your ticket.

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Mountain Meteorology Workshop

Tuesday – Thursday, Sept. 26 – 28
Colorado Mountain College, Leadville
Click here to learn more and purchase your ticket.

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Colorado Snow & Avalanche Workshop

Friday, October 6
Riverwalk Center, Breckenridge
Click here to learn more and purchase your ticket.

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The 10th Annual Benefit Bash

Saturday, December 2
Riverwalk Center, Breckenridge
SAVE THIS DATE! You will not want to miss this year’s Bash.

Featured Follower
Tag us for a chance to be featured!
@friendsofcaic | #friendsofcaic
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@eliotrosenberg : I had a dream last night. Winter is coming.
Want to give back?
Consider donating to Friends of CAIC! Your gift supports CAIC’s backcountry forecasting program and avalanche education throughout Colorado. Help us help you stay safe – donate by using the button below.
Donate Now
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CAIC 9th Annual Benefit Bash is coming December 3

Tickets are selling quickly. Do you have yours?

Join us on Saturday, December 3, at the Riverwalk Center in Breckenridge and support the CAIC in their continued efforts in avalanche forecasting and education throughout Colorado. We hope you can join us! Tickets are on sale now! Get yours today.

Saturday, December 3
9th Annual CAIC Benefit Bash
Breckenridge Riverwalk Center
5:00pm – 10:00pm
Tickets:
http://caicbenefitbash.eventbrite.com/?aff=email1
More info: http://avalanche.state.co.us/about-us/events/

Here are few things you have to look forward to:
•   Live music from
Pearl and Wood and The Davenports.
•   Fantastic beer from Breckenridge Brewery, Broken Compass Brewing Company, Backcountry Brewery, Pug Ryan’s Brewing Company, Dillon Dam Brewery, and The Baker’s Brewery.
•   Amazing catered dinner from
Food Hedz.
•   Over $60,000 in our silent auction and door prizes that must go home with our guests!
 

 


It’s That Time of Year: CAIC Backcountry Weather Forecasting has started, Send in some money & Get on the list

 

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Backcountry Weather Forecast
Issued Friday, November 4, 2016 at 5:13 AM

by Scott Toepfer

 

 

 Weather Discussion

A closed low-pressure system currently camped out over far southern Arizona is spinning some cloud into southern Colorado. Radar indicates a few isolated showers, but nothing serious. Precipitation associated with the low is still moving northward out of New Mexico and Arizona and should arrive over the San Juan Mountains about mid-day Friday. Snowfall potential has decreased the last few model runs. Wind speeds are remarkably light and are not coming from a favorable direction to aid mountain induced snowfall (orographics). Temperature trends have been bumping warmer a little from run to run as well.

A potent dome of high-pressure covers much of the rest of the United States. The main winter storm track is riding up into Canada and over this high-pressure dome and it then drops southeast into New England. The closed low over the desert southwest has some trouble kicking east of a line running north from the Texas panhandle to the Colorado/Kansas line.  At this time it looks to wobble around the Colorado area into early next week. It’s a rather odd pattern so it’s probably a good idea to let the models resolve what this storm wants to do past the weekend time frame before speculating any further.

 

 

Steamboat & Flat Tops at 11,000ft

 

Friday

Friday Night

Saturday

Temperature (°F)

41 to 46

32 to 37

42 to 47

Wind Speed (mph)

0 to 10

3 to 13

2 to 12

Wind Direction

WSW

ESE

E

Sky Cover

Increasing

Mostly Cloudy

Mostly Cloudy

Snow (in)

0

0

0

Front Range at 11,000ft

 

Friday

Friday Night

Saturday

Temperature (°F)

40 to 45

31 to 36

36 to 41

Wind Speed (mph)

2 to 12

1 to 11

2 to 12

Wind Direction

SSE

ESE

E

Sky Cover

Increasing

Mostly Cloudy

Mostly Cloudy

Snow (in)

0

0 to 2

0 to 2

Vail & Summit County at 11,000ft

 

Friday

Friday Night

Saturday

Temperature (°F)

40 to 45

30 to 35

37 to 42

Wind Speed (mph)

2 to 12

2 to 12

2 to 12

Wind Direction

SSE

SE

SE

Sky Cover

Increasing

Mostly Cloudy

Mostly Cloudy

Snow (in)

0

0 to 1 E

0 to 1

Sawatch Range at 11,000ft

 

Friday

Friday Night

Saturday

Temperature (°F)

41 to 46

29 to 34

37 to 42

Wind Speed (mph)

1 to 11

3 to 13

1 to 11

Wind Direction

E

E

E

Sky Cover

Increasing

Mostly Cloudy

Mostly Cloudy

Snow (in)

0 to 1

0 to 2 E

0 to 1 E

Aspen at 11,000ft

 

Friday

Friday Night

Saturday

Temperature (°F)

39 to 44

28 to 33

36 to 41

Wind Speed (mph)

2 to 12

2 to 12

2 to 12

Wind Direction

SE

ESE

SE

Sky Cover

Increasing

Mostly Cloudy

Overcast

Snow (in)

0

0

0 to 1 E

Gunnison at 11,000ft

 

Friday

Friday Night

Saturday

Temperature (°F)

40 to 45

28 to 33

37 to 42

Wind Speed (mph)

3 to 13

3 to 13

3 to 13

Wind Direction

SE

SE

SE

Sky Cover

Increasing

Overcast

Overcast

Snow (in)

0

0

0 to 1

Grand Mesa at 11,000ft

 

Friday

Friday Night

Saturday

Temperature (°F)

43 to 48

33 to 38

40 to 45

Wind Speed (mph)

1 to 11

1 to 11

0 to 10

Wind Direction

SE

SE

SE

Sky Cover

Increasing

Mostly Cloudy

Mostly Cloudy

Snow (in)

0

0

0

Northern San Juan at 11,000ft

 

Friday

Friday Night

Saturday

Temperature (°F)

38 to 43

27 to 32

32 to 37

Wind Speed (mph)

5 to 15

5 to 15

5 to 15

Wind Direction

SE

SE

SSE

Sky Cover

Mostly Cloudy

Overcast

Overcast

Snow (in)

0 to 2

Tr to 3

1 to 3

Southern San Juan at 11,000ft

 

Friday

Friday Night

Saturday

Temperature (°F)

40 to 45

29 to 34

35 to 40

Wind Speed (mph)

1 to 11

2 to 12

3 to 13

Wind Direction

NNE

NE

S

Sky Cover

Overcast

Overcast

Overcast

Snow (in)

Tr to 2

Tr to 2

Tr to 2

Sangre de Cristo at 11,000ft

 

Friday

Friday Night

Saturday

Temperature (°F)

37 to 42

28 to 33

35 to 40

Wind Speed (mph)

2 to 12

1 to 11

3 to 13

Wind Direction

SSE

S

S

Sky Cover

Overcast

Mostly Cloudy

Overcast

Snow (in)

0

0 to 1

Tr to 2

© 2008-2014 Colorado Avalanche Information Center. All rights reserved.


Shop G3 and G3 will donate to your local Avalanche Center. Good deal for All

 

G3 - Genuine Guide Gear

G3 IS GIVING BACK + keeping you safe

NOVEMBER 2016

Genuine Guide Gear

SHOP G3 BY NOVEMBER 28TH TO PARTICIPATE

WE’RE GIVING 10% OF SALES TO YOUR LOCAL AVALANCHE CENter

Amidst the shopping craze of Black Friday and Cyber Monday, G3 is shaking it up and giving back to the backcountry community.

From now until ‘Cyber Monday’ November 28th, we are donating 10% of online sales revenue to avalanche centers around North America.

The best part is you get to choose who we give it to.

Just head to our online store, gear up for the season, and then select where 10% of your purchase should be donated. UAC, CAIC, NWAC, and several others round out the list. We couldn’t get every region, but we look forward to expanding the project next winter.

*Offer does not apply to Pro/Employee purchase program. G3 ships to Canada and USA addresses only.  

GEAR UP NOW Recent Avalanche Safety Posts

 

Genuine Guide Gear

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open season giveaway

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CAIC Benefit

On Saturday, November 14, the Riverwalk Center in Breckenridge will be filled with 1200 mountain enthusiasts as we rally together and support the CAIC in their continued efforts of avalanche forecasting and education throughout Colorado. We hope you can join us! Tickets are selling fast! Get yours today.

Saturday, November 14
8th Annual CAIC Benefit Bash
Breckenridge Riverwalk Center
5:00pm – 10:00pm
Tickets: http://www.breckcreate.org/event/caicbenefitbash/
More info: http://avalanche.state.co.us/caic-benefit-bash/

Here are few things you have to look forward to:
• Live music from Missed the Boat.
• Fantastic beer from New Belgium Brewing.
• Amazing catered dinner from Food Hedz.
• A silent auction with a plethora of options including: a DeLorme InReach, Ortovox avalanche beacons, Mammut airbag, Cat skiing trips, Icebreaker base layers, Black Diamond skis, Dynafit bindings, and even a Booze, Beers, and Backcountry adventure with Wood’s High Mountain Distillery and Elevation Brewery!
• Over $60,000 in door prizes that must go home with our guests!

Click here to see our full list of sponsors as well as our silent auction and live auction line up.

Don’t forget to book your hotel rooms. Beaver Run Resort is offering discounted rates for our guests. Rooms can be booked by calling Beaver Run group reservations at 1-800-525-2253 and mentioning the CAIC Benefit Bash.


Colorado Avalanche Information Center Kow Before You Go campaign kicks off

The 2014/2015 season has been very interesting so far. We have had some great powder days as well as weeks of high pressure and no new snow. However, our snowpack is hovering around average and there is plenty of skiing, riding, and snowmobiling to come!

Today we are launching our 6-week Know Before You Go campaign! Donate now. This is our annual fundraising drive that allows us to be creative and expand the Colorado Avalanche Information Center’s operations. The money raised during this campaign will go toward the following goals.

1. Create and launch Know Before You Go Colorado. This education initiative will be modeled after the Utah Avalanche Center’s model but will be focused on Colorado’s snowpack and avalanche problems.

2. Improve the CAIC’s backcountry forecast program. More forecasting staff means more people that are part of a statewide avalanche safety effort. More forecasters will mean more local field data, which in turn will create more accurate, and timely avalanche forecasts for you, the backcountry user.

3. The expanded resources also mean expansion of our IT infrastructure. Last season we asked you to invest in the development of a mobile app. You responded and we launched V1 in January. We are excited to continually develop the capabilities our website as well as of the app and we need your help to do that.

You want your forecast center, the CAIC, to be the best. Donate today and help us grow and give you the best center in the United States. Once again, I feel so strongly about bringing Know Before You Go to Colorado that I will kick off the campaign with my own $200 donation.

Starting today and for the next 6 weeks the Friends of CAIC will be offering prizes, challenges, and incentives, to anyone who donates $25 or more. Click here for more information or to DONATE NOW!

We will be accepting donations in the following ways:

Donate on Crowdrise: https://www.crowdrise.com/knowbeforeyougo

(Remember you don’t have to pay the “Optional Processing Fee”. Click on the text and select 0%.)

Mail us a check: PO BOX 140817 Denver, CO 80214

Donate ONLINE on our website: http://friendsofcaic.org

Hand us cash!

We are looking forward to your support over the next 6 weeks!

Sincerely,

Aaron Carlson
Executive Director
Friends of CAIC

Ethan Greene
Director
Colorado Avalanche Information Center


Companion Rescue Workshop is being put on by A-Basin Ski Area with the proceeds going to the Colorado Avalanche Information Center

If you go outside in the winter time you should take this course.

clip_image001

Arapahoe Basin Ski Patrol is putting on this class.

Join CAIC, A-Basin Ski Patrol and patrollers from neighboring ski areas for a day of classroom instruction and hands-on outdoor scenarios on how to make solo and group avalanche rescues.

*A Lift Ticket or Season Pass is REQUIRED for this workshop*

Price includes pasta dinner and special presentation about being prepared in the backcountry after the workshop.

Price         $50.00      

Companion Rescue Workshop Pasta Dinner

Pasta for everyone! Join us after the Companion Rescue Workshop for a pasta dinner and special presentation about being prepared in the backcountry in the A-Frame (vegetarian options available).

Open to everyone, even if you’re not participating in the workshop! Bring your friends and join us in the A-Frame. All proceeds go to the CAIC.

To Sign Up Go Here.

What do you think? Leave a comment.

If you like this let your friends know or post it on FB, Twitter or LinkedIn

Copyright 2015 Recreation Law (720) Edit Law

Email: Rec-law@recreation-law.com

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Facebook Page: Outdoor Recreation & Adventure Travel Law

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Mobile Site: http://m.recreation-law.com

By Recreation Law    Rec-law@recreation-law.com         James H. Moss         #Authorrank

#AdventureTourism, #AdventureTravelLaw, #AdventureTravelLawyer, #AttorneyatLaw, #Backpacking, #BicyclingLaw, #Camps, #ChallengeCourse, #ChallengeCourseLaw, #ChallengeCourseLawyer, #CyclingLaw, #FitnessLaw, #FitnessLawyer, #Hiking, #HumanPowered, #HumanPoweredRecreation, #IceClimbing, #JamesHMoss, #JimMoss, #Law, #Mountaineering, #Negligence, #OutdoorLaw, #OutdoorRecreationLaw, #OutsideLaw, #OutsideLawyer, #RecLaw, #Rec-Law, #RecLawBlog, #Rec-LawBlog, #RecLawyer, #RecreationalLawyer, #RecreationLaw, #RecreationLawBlog, #RecreationLawcom, #Recreation-Lawcom, #Recreation-Law.com, #RiskManagement, #RockClimbing, #RockClimbingLawyer, #RopesCourse, #RopesCourseLawyer, #SkiAreas, #Skiing, #SkiLaw, #Snowboarding, #SummerCamp, #Tourism, #TravelLaw, #YouthCamps, #ZipLineLawyer, Colorado Avalanche Information Center, CAIC, Arapahoe Basin, A Basin, Avalanche,

 


Colorado Avalanche Information Center has a new Email Design: Informative and Easy to Understand

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Backcountry Avalanche Forecast
Front Range

danger

Summary

Winds have finally backed off their mission of stripping away the November 10 to 16 storm snow. Temperatures have finally started to warm too, and the valley inversions have begun to ease. Our over-riding avalanche problem remains the Persistent Slab. Reported activity has started to slow, but the persistent weak layer that created the problem still exists.
Fresh loading of snow into starting zones backed off quite a bit beginning yesterday, so that helps relieve some of the building tension in the snowpack that ramped up with wind speeds last weekend. Our snowpack will be in a general holding pattern until our next storm cycle appears later this coming weekend.

problem_1

What You Need to Know About These Avalanches

Persistent slabs can be triggered by light loads and weeks after the last storm. You can trigger them remotely and they often propagate across and beyond terrain features that would otherwise confine wind and storm slabs. Give yourself a wide safety buffer to handle the uncertainty.

problem_2

What You Need to Know About These Avalanches

Wind slabs can take up to a week to stabilize. They are confined to lee and cross-loaded terrain features and can be avoided by sticking to sheltered or wind scoured areas.

Weather Forecast for 11,000ft

Issued Thursday, November 20, 2014 at 6:36 AM by Scott Toepfer

Thursday Thursday Night Friday
Temperature (ºF) 22 to 27 10 to 15 22 to 27
Wind Speed (mph) 10 to 20 7 to 17 8 to 18
Wind Direction W W W
Sky Cover Mostly Cloudy Mostly Cloudy Partly Cloudy
Snow (in) 0-Tr AM 0 to Tr 0

© 2008-2014 Colorado Avalanche Information Center. All rights reserved.


13th Annual Colorado Snow and Avalanche Workshop: If you are in the ski industry in the West you need to be here!

YOU ARE INVITED!

13th Annual Colorado Snow and Avalanche Workshop (CSAW)

English: I took this picture on May 2006, on m...

English: I took this picture on May 2006, on my way to Mount Everest base camp. Ilan Adler. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Friday October 17, 2014

8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Breckenridge Riverwalk Center

150 West Adams Ave

Breckenridge, CO 80424

Tickets: http://tinyurl.com/csawtickets2014

Join the CAIC and Friends of CAIC in Breckenridge, Colorado for this year’s Colorado Snow and Avalanche Workshop.

We have invited speakers from around Colorado and as far as Montana, Canada, and Alaska. It’s going to be a great event and we would love to see you there. You can see the full schedule here: http://tinyurl.com/csaw2014.

Register before October 13th and save on the registration fee.

A powder snow avalanche

A powder snow avalanche (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Also, don’t forget to book your hotel rooms. Beaver Run Resort is offering discounted rates for our attendees. Rooms can be booked by calling Beaver Run group reservations at 1-800-525-2253 and mentioning CAIC.

We are looking forward to another great CSAW!


April is an awesome month for skiing and also an fantastic time to PARTY FOR A PURPOSE and support the CAIC!

Join the Friends of CAIC at the below events and say “Thank You” to our avalanche forecasters for a season for hard work.

April 11th: Après in the Boat – Steamboat, CO

Featuring: Steamboat’s own – Missed the Boat

Where: Bear River Bar and Grill, Steamboat Ski Area

Tickets: $25 in advance; $30 at the door.

Ticket price includes: Bowl of Chili, 2 drink tickets, 1 door prize tickets, access to great music! Advance tickets available until April 10, 2014.

April 17th: Thank you CAIC! – Edwards, CO

E-Town: 5:30pm – 9:00pm

Hug and thank a forecaster for all their hard work this season. Join us in Edwards, Colorado for a benefit party for the CAIC. We will have a ton of gear to give away, some great food, and fantastic beer. All the money raised will go toward the Friends of CAIC Stay Informed, Stay Alive $150,000 challenge. Jump on board today!

Requested donation: $20 at the door.

April 26th: Loveland Corn Harvest – Loveland Ski Area

Logo of Loveland Ski Area

Join your friends for a fun day of spring skiing, lunch, music, prizes, and refreshments at this year’s Corn Harvest.

Where: Loveland Ski Area

When: April 26, 2014

Tickets: $60 (includes: Lunch, Beer, Lift Ticket, door prize ticket)

$30 – With Season Pass

More information can be found here: http://cornharvest.org/

Also, don’t forget. We are in the middle of our Stay Informed, Stay Alive $150,000 Challenge campaign. We have had tremendous support over the past few weeks. Do your part and donate now! http://www.crowdrise.com/stayinformedstayalive/fundraiser/FriendsofCAIC

What do you think? Leave a comment.

If you like this let your friends know or post it on FB, Twitter or LinkedIn

Copyright 2014 Recreation Law (720) Edit Law

Email: Rec-law@recreation-law.com

Google+: +Recreation

Twitter: RecreationLaw

Facebook: Rec.Law.Now

Facebook Page: Outdoor Recreation & Adventure Travel Law

Blog:www.recreation-law.com

Mobile Site: http://m.recreation-law.com

By Recreation Law Rec-law@recreation-law.com    James H. Moss       #Authorrank

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#AdventureTourism, #AdventureTravelLaw, #AdventureTravelLawyer, #AttorneyatLaw, #Backpacking, #BicyclingLaw, #Camps, #ChallengeCourse, #ChallengeCourseLaw, #ChallengeCourseLawyer, #CyclingLaw, #FitnessLaw, #FitnessLawyer, #Hiking, #HumanPowered, #HumanPoweredRecreation, #IceClimbing, #JamesHMoss, #JimMoss, #Law, #Mountaineering, #Negligence, #OutdoorLaw, #OutdoorRecreationLaw, #OutsideLaw, #OutsideLawyer, #RecLaw, #Rec-Law, #RecLawBlog, #Rec-LawBlog, #RecLawyer, #RecreationalLawyer, #RecreationLaw, #RecreationLawBlog, #RecreationLawcom, #Recreation-Lawcom, #Recreation-Law.com, #RiskManagement, #RockClimbing, #RockClimbingLawyer, #RopesCourse, #RopesCourseLawyer, #SkiAreas, #Skiing, #SkiLaw, #Snowboarding, #SummerCamp, #Tourism, #TravelLaw, #YouthCamps, #ZipLineLawyer, CAIC, Colorado Avalanche Information Center, Colorado, Avalanche, Fund Raiser,

 

 

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Friends of CAIC Launches $150,000 fundraising campaign

Hi There,

We have had 7 fatalities thus far this season including the most recent, which happened yesterday in Southern Colorado. Our sincerest condolences go out to the family and friends of the victim. Numerous accidents have happened throughout Colorado and we recently saw an avalanche cycle that was one of the largest in 30 years. It has been and continues to be a very busy season.

The Colorado Avalanche Information Center’s Backcountry Avalanche Forecasting program is small but mighty. The CAIC operates on limited funding and they do incredible work with what they have. Colorado is a very big place and there are more and more people enjoying the State’s spectacular winter backcountry each year. We deserve the best avalanche center in the country. To achieve this goal we need everyone’s support. The State of Colorado is incredibly supportive and has increased the CAIC’s funding. But to really grow, we need you involved. This private public partnership is the best way we can expand the CAIC’s backcountry forecast program and I am personally asking you to support avalanche forecasting and education throughout the State of Colorado. In fact, to show how strongly I feel about the CAIC’s backcountry forecasting program, I will kick off the campaign with my own $200 donation.

Starting today and for the next 7 weeks the Friends of CAIC will be offering prizes, challenges, and incentives, to anyone who donates $25 or more. Click here for more information or to DONATE NOW!

We will be accepting donations in the following ways:

Donate on Crowdrise.com.http://www.crowdrise.com/stayinformedstayalive/

(Remember you don’t have to pay the “Optional Processing Fee”. Click on the text and select 0%.)

Mail us a check: PO BOX 140817 Denver, CO 80214

Donate ONLINE on our website: http://friendsofcaic.org

Hand us cash!

We are looking forward to your help in this campaign.

Sincerely,

Aaron Carlson

Executive Director

Friends of CAIC

Ethan Greene

Director

Colorado Avalanche Information Center

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It’s that time of year again. Support your local Avalanche Information Group

CAIC: Colorado Avalanche Information Center

Morning Backcountry Weather Forecast

CGS: Colorado Geological Survey
Issued: 11/07/2013 4:47 AM by Scott Toepfer
See this forecast on-line. Goto your account.
The Colorado Avalanche Information Center is a program within the Department of Natural Resources.
Weather Discussion
Overnight low temperatures have begun a slow ascent toward the 20’s over the last 12 hours. Breezy winds are helping to scour the cold air out, though some colder valley floor temperatures will persist into Thursday night.
A storm off the coast of southern Canada will move on shore today. Clouds associated with this system stretch down the west coast to Mexico, and these will move across the Great Basin and into Colorado today. With any luck we will see some snow showers develop along our northern zones later this evening. The jet stream and main storm track will be well north of our state, so any snow we get will be on the light side and north of the 40th parallel. With Colorado south of the jet stream core, we can expect some rather windy conditions near and above treeline for Thursday and into Friday.
A high pressure ridge will strengthen on Friday and persist into the weekend bringing mild temperatures and generally clear skies.
The next storm of note is forecast for the middle of next week.

Steamboat & Flat Tops Forecast
Fields Thursday Thursday Night Friday
Temperature (°F) 30 to 35 18 to 23 31 to 36
Wind Speed (mph) 10 to 20 15 to 25 14 to 24
Wind Direction WSW WSW W
Sky Cover Increasing Mostly Cloudy Partly Cloudy
Snow (in) 0 to 2 0 to 1 0

Front Range Forecast
Fields Thursday Thursday Night Friday
Temperature (°F) 32 to 37 20 to 25 32 to 37
Wind Speed (mph) 15 to 25 20-30 G50 20-30 G50s
Wind Direction W W W
Sky Cover Increasing Partly Cloudy Partly Cloudy
Snow (in) 0 to 1N 0 to 1N 0

Vail & Summit County Forecast
Fields Thursday Thursday Night Friday
Temperature (°F) 28 to 33 18 to 23 32 to 37
Wind Speed (mph) 8 to 18 18 to 28 20-30 G50
Wind Direction WSW W W
Sky Cover Increasing Mostly Cloudy Partly Cloudy
Snow (in) 0 0 0

Sawatch Range Forecast
Fields Thursday Thursday Night Friday
Temperature (°F) 30 to 35 20 to 25 32 to 37
Wind Speed (mph) 7 to 17 12 to 22 21-31 G50
Wind Direction WSW WSW W
Sky Cover Partly Cloudy Partly Cloudy Partly Cloudy
Snow (in) 0 0 0

Aspen Forecast
Fields Thursday Thursday Night Friday
Temperature (°F) 30 to 35 18 to 23 32 to 37
Wind Speed (mph) 7 to 17 12 to 22 14-24 G40s
Wind Direction W W W
Sky Cover Increasing Mostly Cloudy Partly Cloudy
Snow (in) 0 0 0

Gunnison Forecast
Fields Thursday Thursday Night Friday
Temperature (°F) 32 to 37 18 to 23 33 to 38
Wind Speed (mph) 5 to 15 7 to 17 10 to 20
Wind Direction SW W WSW
Sky Cover Partly Cloudy Partly Cloudy Mostly Clear
Snow (in) 0 0 0

Grand Mesa Forecast
Fields Thursday Thursday Night Friday
Temperature (°F) 35 to 40 22 to 27 35 to 40
Wind Speed (mph) 5 to 15 8 to 18 6 to 16
Wind Direction SSW S SW
Sky Cover Partly Cloudy Partly Cloudy Partly Cloudy
Snow (in) 0 0 0

Northern San Juan Forecast
Fields Thursday Thursday Night Friday
Temperature (°F) 33 to 38 20 to 25 33 to 38
Wind Speed (mph) 7 to 17 10 to 20 15 to 25
Wind Direction SSW S WSW
Sky Cover Mostly Clear Partly Cloudy Mostly Clear
Snow (in) 0 0 0

Southern San Juan Forecast
Fields Thursday Thursday Night Friday
Temperature (°F) 35 to 40 20 to 25 35 to 40
Wind Speed (mph) 5 to 15 7 t0 17 10 to 20
Wind Direction SW SW SW
Sky Cover Mostly Clear Mostly Clear Mostly Clear
Snow (in) 0 0 0

Sangre de Cristo Forecast
Fields Thursday Thursday Night Friday
Temperature (°F) 35 to 40 20 to 25 35 to 40
Wind Speed (mph) 10 to 20 15 to 25 18-28 G40s
Wind Direction SW SW WSW
Sky Cover Mostly Clear Mostly Clear Clear
Snow (in) 0 0 0
© 2008 – 2013 Colorado Avalanche Information Center. All rights reserved.
Powered by Weatherflow.

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American Avalanche Association Job Openings

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The American Avalanche Association is currently seeking persons to fill two vacancies on AAA’s Management Team: Executive Director and AVPRO Course Coordinator. AVPRO is the AAA’s Professional Avalanche Worker School. Both positions are part-time paid positions.

The Executive Director runs the daily operations of the AAA and provides support to all AAA committees and The Avalanche Review. Additionally, the Director represents the AAA at avalanche industry events such as the ISSW, NAS, and regional meetings and seminars. This is a part-time year round position. Qualified individuals need not be AAA Members.

The AVPRO Course Coordinator is responsible for all aspects of scheduling and planning one to two AVPRO course per winter. Candidates must be AAA Professional Members and AAA Certified Instructors or have the required experience to become a Certified Instructor.

Complete position descriptions can be found on the AAA Employment Page at this link; http://www.avalanche.org/employment.php

Thank you, the AAA Governing Board


NW Avalanche Center 2012-13 Newsletter #03

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An Update from the Avalanche Center

http://www.avalanche-center.org/
May 9, 2013 [Previous, December 5] – [Next, ? ] – [Updates Archive Index]

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Introduction, From the Director

It seems the entire winter went by with no updates this season. Resources have continued to diminished and my own time has been split between an increasing number of other things. However, the Avalanche Center is still here and there have been things happening. Even now we have a very timely spring climbers avalanche course available, designed specifially for this time of year as opposed to mid-winter skiing.

Following the minimal auction we held this season I was on an extended trip for entirely unrelated business. Following that was the annual Outdoor Retailer Show in Utah where we had an exhibitor table for the first time. This was good exposure within the industry, although whether it results in any benefits as far as providing public services is unclear. More recently I had another lengthy trip also unrelated to this project. But despite the unrelated trips and the somewhat involved OR show trip the Level 1 course has been operating and the store has operated, which is essential as it is the primary source of funding at this time.

Shirt Sale – After reducing our supply of shirts earlier we purchased a large number for the OR show, as well as a supply of decals. We sold quite a few but not nearly as many as we had ordered so we are still having a sale. We have all sizes S-XL in comfortable light weight short sleeves for summer, they are $15 including the shipping. You can get yours here: http://www.avalanche-center.org/shirts.php

Education – Avalanche Institute

Our Spring Climbers Course is now in full swing. This is a much simpler and shorter version of a complete Level 1 course and covers spring conditions with an emphasis on climbing (including spring ski mountaineering). In the Northwest US there is a secondary maximum in avalanche fatalities in May and June, and in Oregon the majority of all fatalities have been in late May and the very beginning of June.

This is not a slightly modified Level 1 course with a “twist” of some kind. The weather and snowpack modules are spring specific and do not cover the complications of mid-winter. There is no field day, the emphasis is entirely on planning a safe climb to begin with. Mountaineering usually involves starting before dawn and ascending steep slopes, any kind of snowpit observation once on the slope is a bit of an afterthought. Timing and the current surface conditions are the essential factors and most accidents happen at times when these things should have been identified before leaving home.

Originally it was estimated that this was equivalent in value to half of a complete Level 1 course. But given the complexity and completeness of the Level 1 course and after reviewing the climbing course we have set the regular cost at one third of the Level 1. Students who have completed our Level 1 can take the Climbers course free, and will have covered some of it already. Students who complete the Climbers course this spring may apply it’s full value towards a Level 1 course if they decide to pursue the complete in-depth material next fall.

Right now, through most of May, we are even discounting this particular course below the full value. And as always, members can pay even less. (Members – if you’re not logged in on the registration page just click the key icon to log in, the page should then refresh with the lower price.)

As with the Level 1 course there are complete details posted. You can start with a flowchart of the course modules, click on any of them for specific objectives, and click on the listing to the side for a complete description of any given module. Not only do we provide such complete details on what you will cover but we can guarantee you will be able to cover all of it. There will be nothing lost due to time constraints, outdoor conditions, any temporary loss of attention span, etc.

Like all of our complete courses this is a course, not a tuotrial or forum. There are scored assessments throughout so you have feedback and reinforcement, there is access to an instructor at any point in the course, and there are tools to collaborate with instructors and other students.

Incidentally, these pages are the first to use a new design for the Avalanche Institute which is consistent with the actual course pages. Feedback is welcome, especially with any problems encountered. They are heavily css based which is somewhat of a new approach for this site.

Store – Spring Sale

We have some items left to get rid of on sale. They’ve been posting on e-bay and we’ve sold some that way but close to everything is listed on the sale page now. There are still quite a few probes, B-1 and B-2 BCA shovels, and a few other things left. We’d like to get rid of these before the end of May, partly to free up space and partly because we need the cash flow over summer.

As always there are even lower prices for members, and no shipping. If you are on the sale page and not logged in it will show that. Click the key icon, log in, and the page should refresh with members deals. (When we began members features they were all just linked to from the welcome page but we have converted most of them to this method of displaying the members version to members who are logged in automatically.

Incidentally, shirts on the store sale page are even cheaper than the page linked to in the introduction above, and on the members sale page they are even cheaper – as cheap as we can possibly sell them for! (The price on the shirts page is somehow built in as $15 so until we figure out how to change that in paypal the store sale page is lower.)

Beacon Park Notes

One of our customers was doing some very in-depth practicing and beacon analysis this winter and the outcome is worth sharing.

He had what he felt were strange results with his new digital beacon. To eliminate the possibility of a faulty beacon we replaced it for him, although it seems like now that it was faulty. He continued to try multiple beacon searches with different brands and models and numbers of targets with mixed results.

In the end it appears one of the primary issues was using a beacon park for too many targets. The targets in beacon parks are not actual beacons – before long these would be recovered and disappear. They are very good simulations and work fine until you search for too many at once. SInce every park and each beacon model is a bit different, and spacings and orientations are different, it’s not possible to give a number for “too many”. But if you increase the number of target signals and it seems like your beacon is not acting quite right there are probably signal issues due to complicated spacings, orientations and other factors among the beacon simulators.

This should not be a serious limitation on the value of these parks for practice, it is possible to search for several signals and have a reasonable response from your beacon. Realistically it is very uncommon to have to search for very many signals at once, and to the extent it may happen any more than 3 should be extremely rare. There are a few such cases in our incident database than spans almost 2000 reports and 15+ years, but not many.

The beacon park “saturation” issue came up after some email discussions this customer had with other alpine club members, at least one representative from a beacon manufacturer, guides, and others. It appears to be the major reason for differences between several real beacons buried and too many signals in a park. But there are some secondary factors in some situations as well – there have always been potential difficulties with older analog beacons as targets, especially using flagging features for them, and differences in models may cause a few issues. It’s also important to get a feel for the best speed to move at, it seems that for many digital beacons steady but slow is best but be sure to practice with your own to see. Moving too fast or too abrupty may not allow the processing to keep up, especially with multiple burials.

So beacon parks are great for testing your beacon skills and finding out about any quirks with search speed, multiple signals, etc. But if you turn on too many targets and things don’t seem to work right you may just be exceeding the limits of what you can do there. (And the limits of what you really need to do anyway.)

One result of all the trial and error and discussion behind this is that Yuri probably knows his beacon very well by now, and probably has excellent searching skills!

On Tap …

There is work to be done this month as time allows and updates will be sent as that gets done. Aside from running the climbers course and selling off what’s left in the store the next task is continued catching up on the years incidents. This has been going on but slowly and any comments on this will have to wait for the next update.

Even though labor has always been almost entirely donated the spectre of paying overhead costs is always there, even through summer, and the biggest thing that helps the project right now is to contribute. Purchasing your equipment from us helps a lot too and often includes membership as well as access to educational material.

Remember:

We are up to 1770 friends and 205 followers on Facebook – are you one of them? If you are have you suggested us to any of your friends?

Jim Frankenfield
Executive Director


Avalanche Center 2012-13 Newsletter #02

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An Update from the Avalanche Center

http://www.avalanche-center.org/
December 5, 2012 [Previous, November 1 ] – [Next, ? ] – [Updates Archive Index]

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Introduction, From the Director

This is long overdue and there is a lot to do at the moment so this update will be brief with links to the few key projects mentioned. In a nutshell: we are running an auction this year, we have some news on the Avalanche Institute, and our budgeting for the past season is complete.

As for budgeting, our less than perfect but pretty decent accounting shows us exactly breaking even last season. Which is a necessary improvement over the previous two seasons. For the project to continue we need your support. We are into the third month of this season and according to a rough tally of store revenue (mostly) and donations (a few) we should have raised enough to cover the first two months. Marginally at least. We are still working on borrowed funds in a sense since we’re selling products we have not yet had to pay for. So please help out if you support avalanche safety!

Shirt Sale – We still have a few shirts on sale (and watch the auction as well). Short sleeves L and XL only, they are $15 including the shipping. You can get yours here: http://www.avalanche-center.org/shirts.php

Auction (and Store)

We did not seek product donations this season but we are still having an annual auction. We have items from recent years that nobody won or claimed, and we also have some store inventory to include. Past donations on auction this year include a nice Columbia ski jacket and some MSR Lightening snowshoes with extra tails as well as small items such as sunscreen, sno-seal, and more. (Not everything is posted yet, hopefully by the end of Wednesday.) Store items include a lot of probes, some books, a study kit, and probably a few more things. We have a Float 32 pack to auction, we had to include one in a preseason order and can’t afford to keep it around until it sells at retail. (Store items are also still being added, again with a goal of Wed.)

As in the past we may offer some items, including beacons, as short term incentives. We post these for a few days at a time. Despite promoting them they usually go for very low bids so keep checking in.

Finally, you can auction your own items off. We have never promoted this much but one year a supporter posted some skis and they were quickly sold. So you never know, and it’s free. We do not charge or take any commission but we do hope that if you sell something you’ll donate a percentage to the cause. Or auction it entirely for our benefit and one supporter did with a pack one year.

Other than the auction the store is still slowly being updated. It’s mostly there but some things are still out of date.

Right now the Ortovox line is completely up to date and to celebrate the shopping cart will automatically deduct 20% from any Ortovox product. This replaces the previous BCA discount/sale. The members discount applies on top of this which amounts to a really great deal for this time of year. There is no set expiration date, it could end tomorrow! (OK, it’s not ending tomorrow, but beyond that we haven’t decided.)

If you find and report any problems, such as an item not automatically being discounted, we will look into it and send you a free shirt if it turns out that we need to fix something.

We also have a new special on the clearance page. The two old style G3 probes were sold on e-bay and we are now selling a Life-Link 246 Carbon probe.

Education – Avalanche Institute

We have some progress on the Avalanche Institute, primarily for store customers and avalanche center members. Members that are logged into the avalanche center can register themselves in the Avalanche Institute on their own. Once registered there they can go through the probe and shovel mini-courses as well as an introductory module at no cost. There is now a screen-capture video demonstrating how members can register, login, and subscribe to the few free (mini-)courses. For most modules an administrator still needs to add users after registration and payment but this is easier and quicker if you already have an account. For non-members an admin will still need to create your account. (The video is linked to public home page.)

Anyone who purchases a beacon can take Module 2 (Safe Travel and Equipment) and Module 3 (Rescue), as well as Module 1 which is a short general background prerequisite. We have not promoted this benefit enough yet but we hope to be able to contact this seasons beacon customers directly to invite them to do this soon. (If you purchased a beacon you are a member so you can register in the institute as demonstrated in that video. As long as you first register on the main avalanche center and then log in.)

As mentioned above, there are two mini-courses that are free to purchasers of probes and/or shovels as well as to members. These cover useful information that often gets lost in the rush of a full weekend course. These mini-courses are too brief to be able to apply them towards any full modules or courses, but in addition to the educational value they also introduce the Dokeos platform we use, the type of structured learning path typically used, and how quizzes work

2011-2012 Budget

For the most part what there is to say about this was said at the top. If you’d like to have a look at our budget, both last seasons and historically, there are a few pages: the 2011-12 final summary, a historical overview, and a (rather discouraging) contribution history.

On Tap …

The auction and the Avalanche Institute are current priorities. There is more on the institute that will need to wait until the next update. With the auction running that will not be long. In addition, the Incidents section still needs to be completed for last season and started for this season. This follows closely in the priority list behind the auction and educational work but resources are extremely limited.

Even though labor has always been almost entirely donated the spectre of paying overhead costs is always there and the biggest thing that helps the project right now is to contribute. Purchasing your equipment from us helps a lot too and includes membership as well as access to educational material. And right now you can help promote the auction – if you are on Facebook share our event, repost relevant posts, and invite others to the event.

Remember:

We are up to 1704 friends and 205 subscribers on Facebook – are you one of them? If you are have you suggested us to any of your friends?

Jim Frankenfield
Executive Director

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CAIC Starting Morning Backcountry Weater Forecasts. If you DO you should Become a Member!

CAIC: Colorado Avalanche Information Center

Morning Backcountry Weather Forecast

CGS: Colorado Geological Survey

It’s that time of year. You should be a member of CAIC and getting these forecasts.

There have already been two avalanches catching people in North America.

The Colorado Avalanche Information Center is a program within the Department of Natural Resources.

Weather Discussion

Today is our first day of backcountry weather forecasting for the 2012-2013 season. We begin November with warm and dry conditions as Colorado sits under a weak ridge of high pressure. Daytime high temperatures will climb into the low 50s. The ridge will move east this afternoon, and light to moderate winds will shift from westerly to southwesterly by later this afternoon. High-level cloud cover will increase later this afternoon and overnight.

A cold front and low-pressure trough is moving across Pacific Northwest, and will slide by to our north on Friday. Some cooler air will drop down into Colorado. Daytime highs on Friday will be about 10 degrees cooler than today for the Northern Mountains and 5 degrees cooler elsewhere. Winds will veer to the west northwest on the backside of the passing trough. The next chance for snowfall looks likes its over a week away. It’s too early to start talking about snowfall amounts, but it looks like the storm could produce some decent snowfall. We’ll keep tracking it, and the storm will come into better focus as it nears Colorado.


Steamboat & Flat Tops Forecast
Fields Thursday Thursday Night Friday
Temperature (°F) 45 to 50 24 to 29 35 to 40
Wind Speed (mph) 10 to 20 8 to 18 7 to 17
Wind Direction WSW W WNW
Sky Cover Mostly Clear Increasing Mostly Cloudy
Snow (in) 0 0 0

Front Range Forecast
Fields Thursday Thursday Night Friday
Temperature (°F) 46 to 51 23 to 28 36 to 41
Wind Speed (mph) 10 to 20 10 to 20 8 to 18
Wind Direction WSW W WNW
Sky Cover Mostly Clear Increasing Mostly Cloudy
Snow (in) 0 0 0

Vail & Summit County Forecast
Fields Thursday Thursday Night Friday
Temperature (°F) 47 to 52 21 to 26 37 to 42
Wind Speed (mph) 8 to 18 10 to 20 7 to 17
Wind Direction WSW W W
Sky Cover Mostly Clear Increasing Mostly Cloudy
Snow (in) 0 0 0

Sawatch Range Forecast
Fields Thursday Thursday Night Friday
Temperature (°F) 46 to 51 24 to 29 37 to 42
Wind Speed (mph) 7 to 17 10 to 20 10 to 20
Wind Direction W W WNW
Sky Cover Mostly Clear Increasing Partly Cloudy
Snow (in) 0 0 0

Aspen Forecast
Fields Thursday Thursday Night Friday
Temperature (°F) 48 to 53 24 to 29 43 to 48
Wind Speed (mph) 5 to 15 5 to 15 7 to 17
Wind Direction WSW W WNW
Sky Cover Mostly Clear Increasing Partly Cloudy
Snow (in) 0 0 0

Gunnison Forecast
Fields Thursday Thursday Night Friday
Temperature (°F) 49 to 54 28 to 33 44 to 49
Wind Speed (mph) 5 to 15 5 to 15 5 to 15
Wind Direction WSW W W
Sky Cover Mostly Clear Increasing Partly Cloudy
Snow (in) 0 0 0

Grand Mesa Forecast
Fields Thursday Thursday Night Friday
Temperature (°F) 49 to 54 29 to 34 41 to 46
Wind Speed (mph) 2 to 12 2 to 12 3 to 13
Wind Direction WSW WSW W
Sky Cover Mostly Clear Increasing Partly Cloudy
Snow (in) 0 0 0

Northern San Juan Forecast
Fields Thursday Thursday Night Friday
Temperature (°F) 49 to 54 26 to 31 44 to 49
Wind Speed (mph) 5 to 15 8 to 18 6 to 16
Wind Direction WSW WSW W
Sky Cover Mostly Clear Mostly Clear Mostly Clear
Snow (in) 0 0 0

Southern San Juan Forecast
Fields Thursday Thursday Night Friday
Temperature (°F) 46 to 51 27 to 32 41 to 46
Wind Speed (mph) 7 to 17 8 to 18 5 to 15
Wind Direction SW WSW W
Sky Cover Mostly Clear Mostly Clear Mostly Clear
Snow (in) 0 0 0

Sangre de Cristo Forecast
Fields Thursday Thursday Night Friday
Temperature (°F) 46 to 51 27 to 32 41 to 46
Wind Speed (mph) 10 to 20 10 to 20 10 to 20
Wind Direction WSW W W
Sky Cover Mostly Clear Mostly Clear Mostly Clear
Snow (in) 0 0 0
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Thursday, November 29 – 7 pm Fashion Show, Auction, Retro-Party and Avalanche Fundraiser

Neptune Mountaineering, Boulder

It’s the party of the year and you’re invited! The lovely ladies of Neptune Mountaineering have recruited the beautiful people (who also happen to rip on a pair of skis) to strut their stuff on the runway for the Fall 2012 Neptune Mountaineering Fashion Show.  They’ll be showing off the hottest outdoor ski fashion and gear for the upcoming season.  Of course, this is not just a fashion show -it’s a party – and not the milk and cookies type.  It’s a costume party with a retro ski wear theme, so be sure to wear your Scott Schmidt one-piece and rear-entry boots.  We’ll also be hosting a silent auction on ski gear, clothes and other items from sponsors of the event, so bring your bidding hat and your wallet! There will be adult beverages, an avalanche shaped cake, ski flicks on the big screen, music and good times for all. All proceeds from the night go to the Colorado Avalanche Information Center, who work hard day and night to make sure you stay alive. Party starts at 7 pm and ends who-knows-when. 

Don’t miss the Soiree supporting Colorado Avalanche Information Center.

For more information on Neptune Mountaineering Events go here.

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Mountain Weather Workshop: Nov 2-4: Its getting to be that time of year!!!!

Mountain Weather Workshop

Avalanche On Ozone

Register online here:

The Colorado Avalanche Information Center (CAIC) and the Silverton Avalanche School are offering a three day workshop on Mountain Meteorology. Morning sessions

will provide a basic understanding of meteorological principles applied to weather in mountainous areas. Afternoon sessions will focus on using publicly available weather information to create a local forecast. Participants will interact with experienced weather forecasters and work in small groups to generate and present their own forecasts. The workshop is designed for avalanche practitioners and avid recreationalists. Anyone interested in mountain weather phenomena is welcome and no previous meteorological education is required. Participants are encouraged to bring their own laptop computer with wireless capability for the small group exercises.

This course is intended for anyone who wants a deeper understanding of weather processes and the products available for forecasting. Ski patrol, mountain guides, avalanche forecasters, natural resource managers, avid recreationalists and mountain pilots would all benefit from this course.

Instructors
Dr. John Snook, Mountain Weather and Avalanche Forecaster, CAIC – Boulder
Dr. Ethan Greene, Director, CAIC

Students receive a mountain weather workbook as a part of the course. We highly recommend bringing a laptop with wireless networking capability.

Workshop Summary

A commonly practiced weather forecast strategy is to take a systematic approach to organizing forecast information by spatial scale. The approach starts by analyzing large-scale hemispheric information and then working downscale to high-resolution information. The workshop schedule reflects this strategy with a focus on big picture weather basics and phenomena on day one, followed by regional-scale weather on day two, and then mountain-scale weather on day three. Morning sessions will provide an understanding of meteorological systems at these particular scales. Afternoon sessions will apply this understanding to prediction techniques typically used by professional weather forecasters. Participants will gain practical skills through small group forecast preparation exercises at the end of each day.

Course Goals:

English: I took this picture on May 2006, on m...
• Provide a basic understanding of meteorology
• Apply that understanding to mountain weather
• Learn mountain weather forecasting techniques

Specifically, the Mountain Weather curriculum addresses:
• A general approach to weather forecasting
• Basic forecasting strategies and processes
• Meteorology basics
• Observational meteorology components
• Introduction to weather computer models
• Hemispheric to regional to mountain scale weather processes
• Precipitation mechanics
• Interpretation of weather products

Upon completion of the course, students will have had the opportunity to:
• Learn and utilize a framework and checklist for mountain scale weather forecasting
• Access and interpret available weather resources and models in forecasting exercises
• Develop a list of resources and forecasting approach to a specific area(s) of interest

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Colorado Avalanche Information Center

Want the best snow reports for this winter season: Become a member of CAIC, the reports are free, but it’s cheap to find out where the real powder, not what some resort says! Join and maybe save your life.

Starting this season, we will no longer require a donation to receive forecasts via email. From now on you can get all of our mountain weather and avalanche products on the web, phone line via Twitter, or email for free. We have wanted to make this change for quite some time. It is a financial gamble for us, but we feel it is the right thing to do. Avalanche safety information should be free and readily available to everyone that needs it.

This change, and all the new features for the 2011-2012 season will move to our live website next week. This is later than we would like, but testing the features has taken longer than we expect. As a result, many of you received a renewal notice this week. I am sorry that this message went out and for the confusion it caused. We have extended everyone’s subscriptions, so you will keep getting the emails you were signed up for last season. By Thanksgiving everyone will be able to sign up for a free account so they can send us observations and get forecasts via email.

We still need your financial support. Although our funding appears to be stable, these are hard times for everyone and no one knows the future of any government program. Backcountry use in our state increases every year and we are constantly trying to provide a better service. Please support the Friends of the CAIC through one of their events, make a donation through their website or donate directly to the CAIC through the Geological Survey’s website. You can always send comments, suggestions and donations to:

CAIC
325 Broadway WS1
Boulder, CO 80305
caic@qwestoffice.net

Thank you for all of your support in the past and I hope the services we provide continue to deserve your support now and in the future.

Ethan Greene
Director, CAIC

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