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Rocky Mountain Recalls Bicycles with Front Disc Brakes to Replace Quick Release Lever Due to Crash Hazard

http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2016/Rocky-Mountain-Recalls-Bicycles-with-Front-Disc-Brakes-to-Replace-Quick-Release-Lever/

Hazard: An open quick release lever on the bicycle’s front wheel hub can come into contact with the front disc brake assembly, causing the front wheel to come to a sudden stop or separate from the bicycle, posing a risk of injury to the rider.

Recall Summary

Name of Product: Rocky Mountain Bicycles

Remedy: Repair

Consumers should stop using the recalled bicycles immediately and contact an authorized Rocky Mountain retailer for free installation of a new quick release on the front wheel.

Consumer Contact: Rocky Mountain toll-free at 800-663-2512 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday, via email at info@bikes.com or online at http://www.bikes.com and click on Safety/Recall at the bottom of the page.

Recall Details

Photos Available At http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2016/Rocky-Mountain-Recalls-Bicycles-with-Front-Disc-Brakes-to-Replace-Quick-Release-Lever/

Units: About 17,300 (in addition, 61,000 were sold in Canada)

Description: This recall involves all 2003 through 2016 models of Rocky Mountain bicycles equipped with front disc brakes and a black or silver quick-release (QR) lever on the front wheel hub. Bicycles that do not have disc brakes are not included in this recall. When the front QR is fully opened, if there is less than 6 mm — or the width of a #2 pencil — between the QR and disk brake rotor on the wheel, the bicycle is included in this recall. 

Incidents/Injuries: None reported

Sold at: Rocky Mountain bicycle dealers nationwide and online at http://www.Bikes.com (Rocky Mountain Bicycles), http://www.Ems.com (Eastern Mountain Sports), http://www.JensonUsa.com, http://www.MikesBikes.com and http://www.PerformanceBike.com from May 2002 through April 2016 from between $250 and $15,000.

Distributor: Rocky Mountain Bicycles, of Canada 

Manufactured in: Canada, China, Taiwan and Vietnam

Retailers: If you are a retailer of a recalled product you have a duty to notify your customers of a recall. If you can, email your clients or include the recall information in your next marketing communication to your clients. Post any Recall Poster at your stores and contact the manufacturer to determine how you will handle any recalls.

For more information on this see:

For Retailers

Recalls Call for Retailer Action

A recall leads to lawsuits because injuries are connected to the product being recalled thus a lawsuit. Plaintiff’s hope the three can be connected

Combination of a Products Liability statute, an Expert Witness Report that was just not direct enough and odd facts holds a retailer liable as manufacture for product defect.

Product Liability takes a different turn. You must pay attention, just not rely on the CPSC.

Retailer has no duty to fit or instruct on fitting bicycle helmet

Summary Judgment granted for bicycle manufacturer and retailer on a breach of warranty and product liability claim.

For Manufacturers

The legal relationship created between manufactures and US consumers

A recall leads to lawsuits because injuries are connected to the product being recalled thus a lawsuit. Plaintiff’s hope the three can be connected

Combination of a Products Liability statute, an Expert Witness Report that was just not direct enough and odd facts holds a retailer liable as manufacture for product defect.

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Author: Outdoor Recreation Insurance, Risk Management and Law

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By Recreation Law    Rec-law@recreation-law.com         James H. Moss

 

 

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Colorado Sees Skier Visits Recede for 2011/12 Season

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

http://www.coloradoski.com/media/press-releases

A person without the use of his legs learning ...

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Colorado Sees Skier Visits Recede for 2011/12 Season

Bright Spots in Colorado Ski Country USA amid Lackluster Winter

Boulder, Colo.June 6, 2012 – Colorado Ski Country USA (CSCUSA) announced today at its 49th Annual Meeting, that its 22 member resorts hosted an estimated 6.16 million skier visits during the 2011-12 ski season. This represents a decrease of 11.4 percent, or approximately 790,000 skier visits, compared to last season, which was the fourth best season on record. Compared to the five year average, CSCUSA member resort skier visits are down 11.9 percent. The overall snow related decline interrupted the recovery resorts had been building since 2008/09.

In an indication of the extreme weather impacting Colorado resorts this season, Colorado’s western slope experienced its third driest and seventh warmest winter in records going back to 1895. Precipitation on the Western Slope this winter was 43 percent below average, and down every month of the winter. In Colorado overall, March 2012 was the driest in more than 100 years, and we experienced the second warmest March on record. President and CEO of Colorado Ski Country USA Melanie Mills noted, “Fortunately, seasons such as the one just ended have proved to be historically rare and the ski industry has exhibited a remarkable ability to bounce back after poor snow years in the past.”

Mills continued, “Much of the ski industry in the US was confronted with weather challenges last year, but several of our resorts bucked the national trend and showed signs of resilience during what was clearly an uninspiring winter.”

The diversity of ski resorts in Colorado saw some areas post increases and even records in visitation. Colorado Ski Country resorts also saw strength in both domestic and international destination visitors which helped soften the economic impacts to resort operators and resort communities of the overall decline in visitation.

Colorado is favorably positioned for rare dry spells given that resorts are at higher elevations where the air is dryer and colder, therefore allowing the snow to maintain consistency. Aided by colder temperatures favorable for snowmaking, resort snowmakers and slope groomers were able to maintain a quality snow surface throughout most of the season.

Momentum going into the season was strong after seeing an uptick in visitation last year, and economic conditions generally improved during the season. Abundant amounts of snow came in the fall, allowing some resorts to open earlier than planned, but the uncharacteristic precipitation deficit brought that momentum to a standstill. Snow came in the middle of the season and several resorts broke single day snowfall totals, but perception of an underperforming winter was already set in skiers’ minds. “We’ve had dry years in the past, and we’ll have dry years again,” Mills explained. “Not every year can be a record breaking year, and with nary a snowflake in what is normally our snowiest month in Colorado, season visitation numbers are disappointing, but not unexpected.”

CSCUSA resorts upheld their dedication to providing guests with a quality product and superior service which sets Colorado apart from other ski destinations, and keeps the state’s appeal as the premiere place for winter travelers. “Our resorts have so much to offer visitors that in some cases the world class skiing is just one of a menu of activities. And for many people, the season was more about being outside and spending time with friends and family taking in the beautiful outdoors and wonderful amenities of our resorts.”

With certain assumptions in place, statewide skier visits for Colorado are estimated at 11,010,584 million. This estimation shows Colorado being down 9.8 percent, or approximately 1,195,000 visits, compared to last season. On a national level, skier visits overall are down 15.7 percent with the Rocky Mountainregion seeing a decrease of 7.2 percent.

Skier carving a turn off piste

Skier carving a turn off piste (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Skier visits are the metric used to track participation in skiing and snowboarding. A skier visit represents a person participating in the sport of skiing or snowboarding for any part of one day at a mountain resort.

These numbers are preliminary results and subject to final adjustments by CSCUSA members. The decision to release individual numbers is up to each individual resort.