Outline for Starting a New Outdoor Recreation Business

Updated May 28, 2020

Not every business will follow this outline; however, it provides some basic ideas on when and why you need legal advice to protect your business.

Check back as this page will be updated with new ideas and articles.

Year 1

  1. Create Limited Liability Company for your business: Because the cost of starting an LLC in most states is minimal, start one immediately and start using the name to provide notice that you are doing business as an LLC.

For more information about entity options see: Starting Your Outdoor Recreation Business: Entities and Taxation

  1. Unless you want your business to be a non-profit business, then set up a non-profit corporation.
  2. Even if you expect to go public at a later time, an LLC provides the most protection immediately.
    1. Start the LLC in your own state. If you need to later, you can move the LLC or start another LLC or corporation in a state that might have better laws than your state, such as Delaware.
      1. Compare the cost of starting an LLC in your home state $50-$100 to Delaware, $750.00
  1. Apply for the necessary permits to operate on the land you want to be using.
    1. Inquire with the land managers if there are permits available.
    2. Find out how to apply for a permit and the requirements
    3. Determine if you can get a permit.
    4. Make friends with the person in charge of permits.
  2. Apply for Insurance for your business

    I can provide you with a list of insurance carriers who specialize in Outdoor Recreation Insurance. Email me at mailto:jhmoss@gmail.com?subject=I’m interested in your list of insurance brokers Include your name and contact information and a little about your business.

    1. Basic business liability policy
      1. This provides protections you might need such as someone falling at your office, advertising liability, etc.
    2. Specialty risk policy for your outdoor activity
      1. This provides the protection for the specific activity you want to do.
        1. Make sure it provides coverage for SAR costs.
    3. Commercial Automobile policy
      1. If you are going to transport people, this policy will probably be your most expensive policy so purchase it only when you need it.
  3. Write a Risk-Management Plan
    1. Probably one page long. Any longer and you are writing a plan for attorneys to sue you.
    2. You cannot write a plan that covers every risk you, your employees and your guests are going to encounter. So don’t try.
    3. What you can do is take an ICS course, online, and learn how write a plan that deals with what to do, what you have and who to contact rather than trying to decide how to put out a fire.

    For more on this subject see: Creating Your Risk-Management Plan

  4. Identify classes and education needed by you and your employees for the programs you will be running/teaching/instructing. (Certification is not the key; education is. See Basics of the Article are Good – But it confuses certification, accreditation and most importantly standards.)
    1. First Aid Classes
      1. Dependent upon the distance from Emergency Medical Services
      2. Dependent upon the first aid supplies you can carry.
      3. Dependent upon the injuries you guests & employees may incur.
      1. This is a critical skill set, knowledge and practice to operate on my lands in the US.
    2. Technical Classes (Examples)
      1. Swift Water Rescue
      2. Top Rope
      3. Mountaineering Guide
    3. Classes required by a State of Federal Licensing Agency. (Examples)
      1. Child Care
      2. Health Department Food Preparation
    4. Educational classes(Examples)
      1. Flora, Fauna & Ecosystem training for the area you will be operating.
  5. Create your marketing campaign and social media presence
  6. Contact me to write a release for you.

    Send an email to jhmoss@gmail.com and request the form to fill out to complete a release for your business. Please provide contact information and information about your business.

    1. The release will be based on:
      1. What you intend to do.
      2. On whose land you intend to do it.
      3. The guests you want work with.
      4. The state where you intend to work.
  7. Apply for any state license you need to operate.
    1. Travel Agent License
    2. Transportation license
    3. Outfitter and/or guides licenses
  8. Identify Trade Associations & join.

For more on this see: Why you should always be a member of the trade association that represents the activity you provide?

9. Hire a CPA

Year 2-3

  1. Determine if you need additional Limited Liability companies.
    1. Separate LLC’s for each state you may be operating in.
    2. Separate LLC for the assets you have.
      1. Each piece of Real Estate should be located in its own LLC.
      2. All vehicles should be in a transportation LLC.
    3. Separate LLC’s for each Federal, State or Local Permit
      1. Alternatively, you can keep the permits in your name.

    For more information on this subject see: Why would you create more than one Limited Liability Company for your business?

    Call me to discuss these options and which one is best for you:
    Schedule an Appointment

  2. Write the necessary contracts to operate the different LLC’s
    1. Owner ship of the LLC’s for the different states you are operating in.
    2. Lease Agreements for real estate you are operating on.
    3. Contracts for hiring transportation services for your guests and employees
  3. Review your insurance policies every two years to make sure your coverage is adequate, and you are paying the proper premium.
  4. Create a risk management training program with local Fire, EMS, Law Enforcement and SAR.
  5. Start running background checks on new employees
    1. Do this every year if you are dealing with minors?
  6. Identify State and Local marketing associations and determine the value to your business.
  7. Further Develop Your Marketing Plan
    1. Adjust your marketing plan for the customers you are receiving.
    2. Develop social media presence
    3. Develop a referral program
    4. Develop a local community marketing program
  8. Develop vehicle maintenance programs
  9. Develop equipment maintenance and replacement programs
  10. Hire bookkeeper or payroll firm that works with your CPA.

Year 3-5

  1. Check to see if your release needs updated.
  2. Run background checks on all employees each year.
  3. Develop in-house training programs
    1. First Aid as needed by:
      1. Your Clientele
      2. Your area of operations
      3. Your permit or licenses
  4. Develop a managerial training program
  5. Set up additional LLC’s for holding assets and separating risk
    1. Each parcel of land should be set up in a separate LLC.
      1. Each parcel of land should have a lease agreement with the entity or business using it.
    2. Each high-risk asset should be placed in a separate entity.
      1. Transportation
        1. Each transportation entity should have its own agreement.
    3. Travel Agency
      1. If you are booking more than trips, separate this off to a separate LLC and set it up as a separate travel agency.
  6. Develop equipment and asset replacement plan

Years 5-10

  1. Look at moving assets into a Limited Liability Limited Partnership for greater protection
  2. Look at who is going to take over your business.
    1. Start to create an exit plan
  3. Create Insurance deductible account and fund
    1. Raise your deductible based on the amount of money you have been able to place in the insurance deductible account.
      1. This amount should be a minimum of five times your deductible, possible ten times.

Why would you create more than one Limited Liability Company for your business?

There are dozens of reasons, read on.

There are dozens of reasons why you would create multiple limited liability companies for your business.

  1. A Limited Liability Company, (LLC), is easy and inexpensive to set up and operate.
  2. Each LLC protects the assets in it.
  3. Each LLC protects the assets of the other LLC’s
  4. Each LLC protects the assets of the parent LLC.
  5. Each LLC makes it harder to sue the parent and other LLC’s
  6. Like not having all of your eggs in one basket, separate LLC’s provide better protection for all of your assets.
  7. If you lose a lawsuit above your insurance limits, only the LLC that was sued is as risk not your other assets, locations or companies.
  8. Each LLC can be taxed a different way.
  9. You can take money out of each LLC a different way.
  10. Setting up different LLC’s for each state you may operate in provides more options for the LLC in that state.
  11. Setting up a different LLC for each state you operate in provides more tax advantages for the LLC in that state.
  12. Overall, you create more barriers to losing your business because of creditors.

And there are many more reasons beyond these twelve.

As an example let’s look at a small outfitter or climbing wall with the following assets:

  • Two locations (leased)
  • Equipment share by both operations
  • Equipment at each operation

You would set up the LLC’s this way probably.


Each separate business operation or real estate address should have it’s own LLC. Any equipment that is used by both LLC’s can be in a separate LLC that is rented to the business LLC’s when needed. The equipment rental company can also be used to buy all equipment and products needed by the operations to get better deals. Any management, operations, etc., are done out of the Parent LLC that owns the other three LLCs. If either businesses gets sued, the assets of the other LLC, the joint Equipment and the management assets are protected from that lawsuit.

If you operate a business that is based on permits you may want a separate LLC for each permit you own.

If you owned land under your businesses, you would want those in separate LLC’s. You can lose the business and start the next day because you still own a lot of the equipment and the land.

There are some negative issues with this type of set up.

The relationship between each LLC and the other LLC’s must be in writing with a proper agreement and proper accounting. That means there needs to be a management contract between the parent company and the different LLCs. There needs to be a rental agreement between the equipment company and the operating LLCs.


If you are an outfitter with this set up, and you transport your guests in vehicles you would want to add a transportation LLC. Your greatest liability is in moving guests to the activity location. Always keep your liabilities separate from your assets.

In this situation, you would need a lease agreement between the Operations and the Real Estate LLCs.


If you start to grow to the point that this gets unwieldy, you can consolidate and combine assets.


Your situation and growth are going to be different and will vary on how well you, and your CPA can work together. Other than increased accounting costs, you will achieve significant protection from any possible lawsuit by using multiple LLCs with little additional work.

If you have a good CPA, you can also have the LLC’s taxed differently to provide different benefits or income to you. You can take money out of some LLC’s as income, some as rent, others as an independent contractor based on how you initially set them up and how they are recognized by the IRS.

One final idea is you may have assets that are so valuable and small that you do not want to keep them in any LLC that could get sued. An example would be a federal permit or concession contract. You could keep those in your own name or in a different LLC that does nothing but leases those permits to your LLC’s. That way, no matter what, you can start again because you have a valid permit.

The final issue might be if you decided to take your company public someday. Contrary to popular belief, incorporating in Delaware is NOT the place to set up your business. Incorporating in Delaware until you have decided to go public has many negatives.

  • People think you are a bigger company, there fore they will sue for more money.
  • The cost of incorporating in Delaware is several times more expensive than most other states.
  • The yearly costs of maintain a corporation in Delaware is expensive.
  • You have to hire a statutory agent in Delaware who adds to your cost.
  • You have to follow Delaware law in running your company or corporation.
  • Your LLC or Corporation will have to follow Delaware laws so you may have to hire an additional attorney.

What if you want to go public someday? Then at that time, create a Delaware corporation. Have that corporation become the owner of all the other LLCs you have created. Now you are a Delaware corporation ready to go public and have delayed the cost of creating a Delaware corporation until you can afford it.


Save your money when you are starting out, start your LLC in the state where you are going to operate so you understand the state laws your LLC will be operating under.

What do you think? Leave a comment.

Copyright 2020 Recreation Law (720) 334 8529

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If you are interested in having me write your release, fill out this Information Form and Contract and send it to me.

Author: Outdoor Recreation Insurance, Risk Management and Law

Facebook Page: Outdoor Recreation & Adventure Travel Law

Email: Rec-law@recreation-law.com

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By Recreation Law    Rec-law@recreation-law.com    James H. Moss

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Starting Your Outdoor Recreation Business: Entities and Taxation

Entities and Taxation

Choosing and Creating the Right Entity for Your Business

Starting any business now days you should create an entity, corporation, limited liability company, partnership, joint venture or trust to run the business. This helps your accounting, provides you greater tax options and protects your personal assets from a creditor. A creditor can mean someone you owe money to or an injured guest who is suing you.

Protecting your personal assets is probably the most important item on the list followed closely by how you want any profits taxed to you and/or to the entity.

The type of entity you want to create is different in many cases from the way it is to be taxed. The most confusing is Corporations, and Limited Liability Companies taxed as a Sub-S corporation. Everyone always speaks of a Sub-S Corp or S-Corp. However, no such thing exists. If you go to any Secretary of State’s website to create your new entity, you will not see Sub-S listed as an option.

Sub-S is not a type of entity. Sub-S is a way an entity is taxed. You hear people say they have a Sub-S corporation they are referring to the way their entity is taxed not the type of entity. There is no such thing as a Sub-S corporation. There are corporations and limited liability companies that are taxed as under 26 U.S. Code Chapter 1, Subchapter S of the Internal Revenue Code.

If you listen solely to your CPA, if they are not up to date, they will create a regular corporation or (C-Corp) and file it with the IRS as a Sub-S for tax purposes creating liability nightmares for you later. (That is the first reason why you should not have a CPA providing legal advice, besides it is illegal.) Besides, the IRS issued a ruling almost a decade ago that allows a Limited Liability Company (LLC) to be taxed as a Sub-S corp.

Below are various charts to help you understand what entity can do, how much work and cost are involved, how much protection and how that entity can be taxed.

Entity Name

Ways it can be taxed

Restrictions

Rating
1-10

Corporation Corporation

5

Sub-S Must file with IRS & meet restrictions Filing must be done within 60 days of creation. Once filed it is difficult to undo. Sub-S also has restrictions on ownership.

5

Non-Profit Corporation Non Profit Corporation Requires IRS application to receive non-profit status 8
Partnership Partnership 1
Limited Liability Company Sole Proprietor Must be indicated on EIN & LLC documents 10
Partnership Must be indicated on EIN & LLC documents 2
Corporation Must be indicated on EIN & LLC documents 8
Sub-S Must file with IRS & meet restrictions. (See Above) 10
Limited Partnership Partnership 6
Limited Liability Limited Partnership (FLP) Partnership Expensive and a lot of paperwork each year, however the most effective entity to protect assets 10
Entities not created by Application to the State (most states)
(Therefore taxed as one of the entities above)
Joint Venture Determined by the taxation of the parties to the Joint Venture a contractual joint venture

a joint venture partnership

a joint venture company

3
Cooperative Created by Contract 2
Unincorporated Association Recognized in Some states 1
Business Trust Usually taxed as a Corporation, sometimes as a trust 5
Business Association Can be taxed as a partnership or a non-profit organization 4

Another big issue is the difficulty in keeping the entity current, the paperwork updated and to make sure you have the required meetings.

Entity Name

Amount of Paperwork

Rating
1-10

Corporation Requires annual shareholder meetings and at least quarterly board meetings. All meetings must have agendas and corporate minutes. Formalities of creation and running the corporation are strict and failure to do so may result in the corporation being dissolved by the courts.

5

Non-Profit Corporation Requires annual shareholder meetings and at least quarterly board meetings. All meetings must have agendas and corporate minutes. Formalities of creation and running the corporation are strict and failure to do so may result in the corporation being dissolved by the courts.

5

Partnership Every partner is equally liable for any liability of the partnership or another partner. Extremely difficult to dissolve or leave partnership unless partnership agreement provides clear exit structure.

4

Limited Liability Company High amount of protection with the least amount of corporation formalities. Annual update with the Secretary of State is required and a yearly meeting with minutes is recommended.

9

Limited Partnership Initial Partnership Agreement is critical. After that the paperwork is minimal.

7

Limited Liability Limited Partnership (FLP) Creation paperwork is critical and requires several different types of entities, such as LLC’s to also be created so the paperwork burden is massive. After that the paperwork burden does not decrease much. Each entity must be kept up to date and the relationship of the entities must be created by contract.

4

Entities not created by Application to the State (most states)
(Therefore taxed as one of the entities above)
Joint Venture The initial paperwork is critical. After that it is minimal. Joint ventures are usually for a short duration

6

Cooperative The organization agreement is minimal, the members of the cooperative run the co-op and these meetings are important

5

Unincorporated Association Usually there is no paperwork and no protection.

8

Business Trust A business trust is the predecessor the modern corporation. The trust must be set up with care to qualify under state and federal law (IRS) to run a business. Rarely used now days, but appropriate in the right circumstances

4

Business Association Rare and all based on the paperwork

2

What is not reviewed above is running your business as a sole proprietor. There is no paperwork, little accounting and no liability protection. Your tax options are also limited; you are taxed as a sole proprietor. Because it provides no protection, no tax benefits and little value for any other reason, it is not considered an effective way to run a business.

Obviously the best choice now days is an LLC. It can be taxed a multitude of different ways and provides the greatest asset defense for the money with the least amount of paperwork.

The best option is the Limited Liability Limited Partnership; however, you will need to work with an attorney as long as the LLLP is holding assets. Each entity within the LLLP must be properly created and have the correct agreements for the running of that entity and its relationship to the other entities and the LLLP. However, it is virtually impervious to litigation or claims. The problem is the initial costs can be $20,000 and running the LLP can be $5,000 to $10,000 a year in additional legal and accounting fees.

Paperwork

Make sure you complete all the paperwork required to be an entity in the state where you entity was created. That is not just the filing with the Secretary of State. Failure to have the additional paperwork can mean your entity is void. Creditors will go through all of your entity documents and use what you are missing proving your entity is just a sham and close you down.

Entity Name

Type of Paperwork

Corporation Articles of Incorporation

Bylaws

Notices of Shareholder meetings

Notices of Board of Director Meetings

Minutes of Shareholder Meetings

Minutes of Board of Directors meetings

Board Resolutions

Pre-Incorporation Agreement

Consent of Incorporators

Stock Ledger

S-corporation election (if that is the preferred tax method)

Stock Purchase Agreements

Shareholder voting Agreements

Special Meeting Notices

Waiver of Shareholder Notices

Waiver of Shareholder Meeting

Not Mandatory but Important

Buy/Sell Agreement

Stock Sale Restriction Agreement

Non-Profit Corporation Articles of Incorporation

Bylaws

Notices of Shareholder meetings

Notices of Board of Director Meetings

Minutes of Shareholder Meetings

Minutes of Board of Directors meetings

Board Resolutions

Pre-Incorporation Agreement

Consent of Incorporators

Stock Ledger

S-corporation election (if that is the preferred tax method)

Stock Purchase Agreements

Shareholder voting Agreements

Special Meeting Notices

Waiver of Shareholder Notices

Waiver of Shareholder Meeting

Not Mandatory but Important

Buy/Sell Agreement

Stock Sale Restriction Agreement

Closely Held Corporation Agreement

Partnership No paper work is required. However operating a partnership without a partnership agreement that sets forth accounting and exit or dissolution issues can create legal and accounting nightmares.
Limited Liability Company Articles of Organization

Operating Agreement

Minutes of Annual Meeting

Not Mandatory but Important

Buy/Sell Agreement

Stock Sale Restriction Agreement

Limited Partnership Initial Partnership Agreement is critical. After that the paperwork is minimal.
Limited Liability Limited Partnership (FLP) LLLP Agreement

Agreement to create LLLP

LLC Paperwork

Paperwork transferring assets in to LLP

Minutes of Annual Meeting

Contracts for managing all entities owned by the LLLP

Contracts for the operation and management of the LLLP

Proper Paperwork for all entities owned by LLLP

Entities not created by Application to the State (most states)
(Therefore taxed as one of the entities above)
Joint Venture Joint venture Agreement
Cooperative Cooperative Agreement
Unincorporated Association
Business Trust Trust Agreement

The trustee will want to keep meticulous notes and copies of all communications with third parties, assets and beneficiaries of the trust

Business Association Rare and all based on the paperwork

Where should you incorporate.

For decades, everyone wanted to incorporate in Delaware, then Nevada and now day’s South Dakota. Until you can hire an attorney in each of the states where you have an entity, or you want to take your company public, it is not worth the time and money. The cost of putting together and running an LLC in the state where you are doing business can be Ten Percent of the cost of running an LLC in another state.

There is nothing that says after your LLC is up and booming you cannot move it to another state. However, a better idea is to have another entity created in the state where you want to be, own the initial LLC. An example of that is Google was created but is now owned by the Alphabet Corporation. Your LLC can be started in Colorado and when you want to go public, you create a Delaware Corporation which owns the LLC.

Don’t spend $5,000 now to create an entity in a state for something that may happen ten or twenty years from now.

Foreign business wanting to do business in the US.

If you based outside of the US, the information above is no different for you, then it is for a US based business. Create an entity where your business is located or where your attorney is located. That will probably be an LLC that is owned by the entity that you have in your home country. You will have to acquire a Tax Identification Number (TIN or Employer Identification Number (EIN) which are different phrases for the same IRS number).

Once you acquire a TIN you can then open a US bank account to do business.

Summary

Setting up your first entity should not be difficult. Not setting up an entity can be the start of the end. Get good advice, work with someone you get along with and who is willing to explain what you need to know and using this information, concentrate on getting your new business up and running.


Louisiana court holds a tubing operation is not liable for drowning or failure to properly perform CPR. Court finds (or confuses) both no duty owed to prove negligence and assumption of the risk on the part of the deceased.

Louisiana is one state that does not allow the use of a release. (See States that do not Support the Use of a Release.) This limits the possible defenses in LA.

Parveen v. Tiki Tubing, LLC, 2011 1477 (La.App. 1 Cir. 03/23/12); 2012 La. App. Unpub. LEXIS 115

Date of the Decision: March 23, 2012

Plaintiff: Neelam Parveen, Individually and on Behalf of Mansoor Raja and their Minor Children

Defendant: Tiki Tubing, LLC and Abc Insurance Company

Plaintiff Claims: negligence, gross negligence, duty to maintain the river so that its guests would not be injured by the river’s vices and defects, a duty to train Tiki employees in emergency rescue and life-saving procedures, and a duty to properly warn Tiki customers of the hazards associated with tubing on the Amite River. Also failure of the employees of the defendant to perform CPR properly.

Defendant Defenses:

Holding: for the defendant tubing livery

The plaintiff is the husband of the deceased and mother of their children.

The defendant was a tubing rental (livery) operation on the Amite River in Louisiana. For the fee the defendant provides parking, a bus ride to the put in, tubes and a beach entry and exit. The Amite River is advertised by the defendant on it’s website at 1” to 3” deep with 6”-8” holes. The river is slow moving and smooth.

The defendant also states “Tiki . . . and its affiliates assume no liability for personal injury or loss of personal property.” The defendant provides life jackets free of charge however customers are not required to wear them. No one was aware of a prior drowning on the river. No employees of the defendant were trained in life saving or first aid or CPR.

The deceased was accompanied by two other companions. One of the three printed the other names on the release. The deceased did not sign the release. The three were also given safety instructions.

The men started leaving their tubes and swimming downstream for a short distance before waiting for the current to bring their tube to them. At some point the deceased went under the surface and did not come up. Eventually an employee found the deceased and got him to the surface.

A companion started CPR and was assisted by four other people including some employees of the defendant.

The plaintiff filed suit which was dismissed after the defendant filed a motion for summary judgment. The plaintiff appealed.

Summary of the case

The court outlined the plaintiff’s claims as:

Broadly stated, the plaintiff maintains that Tiki had custody of the tubing route on the Amite River and, accordingly, that Tiki owed its patrons a duty to maintain the river so that its guests would not be injured by the river’s vices and defects, a duty to train Tiki employees in emergency rescue and life-saving procedures, and a duty to properly warn Tiki customers of the hazards associated with tubing on the Amite River.

The plaintiff also alleges that once Tiki employees involved themselves in attempted life-saving procedures on Raja, those employees assumed a duty to perform those life-saving measures properly.

Under Louisiana law a tort is defined as:

The elements of a cause of action in tort are fault, causation, and damage. The existence of a legal duty and a breach of that duty are prerequisites to any determination of fault. Although the determination of whether to assign a legal duty is fact-specific, the issue of whether there is a duty ultimately is a question of law.

The court found that to prove her case the plaintiff must prove:

(1) Tiki is the custodian of the portion of the Amite River that includes the tubing route; (2) that portion of the Amite River is defective and that the defect presented an unreasonable risk of harm; (3) Tiki knew or should have known of the defect; (4) the plaintiff was damaged by the defect; and (5) Tiki could have prevented the damage to the plaintiff by the exercise of reasonable care, which Tiki failed to exercise.

Failure to prove one element defeats the plaintiff’s claims.

The court first looked at whether or not the defendant had control over the river to be liable for it. The court defines this as the defendant having custody and control over the river. To determine whether the defendant had the requisite custody and control the court held it had to consider:

(1) whether the person bears such a relationship as to have the right of direction and control over the thing; and (2) what, if any, kind of benefit the person derives from the thing. “The person who has custody or garde of a thing is he who has the legal duty to prevent its vice or defect from harming another.” This court has held that a state-owned river cannot be in the custody of a landowner.

Even if the plaintiff could prove the defendant’s “custody” of the river, the plaintiff would also have to prove that the river section at issue was defective.

This court has held that the “existence of a hole in a natural lake, that renders the depth of the lake deeper than other portions, would not, ipso facto, constitute a defective. Further, “variations in water depth within natural swimming areas are standard.” Citing this court in Johnson, the Fourth Circuit has concluded that there is no distinction between a hole in a lake and a drop off in a river. The plaintiff fails to establish that the deeper pocket in this natural body of water constitutes a defect for purposes of Article 2317.1.

The conditions of the river at the time of the decedents drowning were all conditions that under Louisiana law were inherent risks and thus assumed by the deceased.

The court next looked the risks of tubing.

Tubing has been defined as an activity that is obviously and inherently dangerous. Drowning because of currents is a natural and inevitable risk to swimmers in a natural body of water. When a risk is obvious, there is no duty to warn or protect against it.

The court concluded the deceased voluntarily left this tube to swim in the river without a life jacket.

The court then looked at the issue of failure to perform CPR properly. Under Louisiana law if a person voluntarily undertakes a “task that he otherwise has no duty to perform, he must nevertheless perform that task in a reasonable or prudent manner.

Although the plaintiff’s expert witness stated that CPR was performed improperly, no one was able to claim that the actions of the defendant employees were “unreasonable, imprudent, or, more importantly, a cause-in-fact of Raja’s death or that there was a reasonable probability that proper CPR would have been lifesaving in these circumstances.”

The court found since no one could point that a specific employee or employees had done something wrong in performing CPR then that claim must also fail.

The court upheld the trial courts motion for summary judgment with this statement.” Despite not being a good swimmer, Raja willingly entered the river without a life jacket and chose to swim away from his tube. It was Raja’s own imprudent actions that led to his tragic death.”

So Now What?

Louisiana law came from the Napoleonic code. Consequently the laws in Louisiana are generally different, other than the protections afforded by the US constitution. Louisiana does not allow the use of a release to stop claims.

C.C. Art. 2004 (2005)

Any clause is null that, in advance, excludes or limits the liability of one party for intentional or gross fault that causes damage to the other party. Any clause is null that, in advance, excludes or limits the liability of one party for causing physical injury to the other party.

See States that do not Support the Use of a Release.

Here the court seemed to combine the issue to find the defendant owed no duty to the deceased and the deceased assumed the risk of the activity which lead to his death, without using the terms specifically.

 

What do you think? Leave a comment.

If you like this let your friends know or post it on FaceBook, Twitter or LinkedIn

Copyright 2014 Recreation Law (720) Edit Law

Email: Rec-law@recreation-law.com

Google+: +Recreation

Twitter: RecreationLaw

Facebook: Rec.Law.Now

Facebook Page: Outdoor Recreation & Adventure Travel Law

Blog: www.recreation-law.com

Mobile Site: http://m.recreation-law.com

By Recreation Law       Rec-law@recreation-law.com              James H. Moss               #Authorrank

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