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Georgia Recreational Use Statute

 OFFICIAL CODE OF GEORGIA
ANNOTATED

 TITLE 51.  TORTS

 CHAPTER 3.  LIABILITY OF OWNERS AND OCCUPIERS OF LAND

 ARTICLE 2.  OWNERS OF PROPERTY USED FOR RECREATIONAL
PURPOSES

 § 51-3-20.  Purpose of article

§ 51-3-21.  Definitions

§ 51-3-22.  Duty of owner of land to those using same for recreation generally

§ 51-3-23.  Effect of invitation or permission to use land for recreation

§ 51-3-24.  Applicability of Code Sections 51-3-22 and 51-3-23 to owner of land leased to state or subdivision for recreation

§ 51-3-25.  Certain liability not limited

§ 51-3-26.  Construction of article

§ 51-3-20.  Purpose of article

The purpose of this article is to encourage owners of land to make land and water areas available to the public for recreational purposes by limiting the owners’ liability toward persons entering thereon for recreational purposes.

§ 51-3-21.  Definitions

As used in this article, the term:

(1) “Charge” means the admission price or fee asked in return for invitation or permission to enter or go upon the land.

(2) “Land” means land, roads, water, watercourses, private ways and buildings, structures, and machinery or equipment when attached to the realty. 

(3) “Owner” means the possessor of a fee interest, a tenant, a lessee, an occupant, or a person in control of the premises.

(4) “Recreational purpose” includes, but is not limited to, any of the following or any combination thereof: hunting, fishing, swimming, boating, camping, picnicking, hiking, pleasure driving, aviation activities, nature study, water skiing, winter sports, and viewing or enjoying historical, archeological, scenic, or scientific sites. 

§ 51-3-22. Duty of owner of land to those using same for recreation generally 

Except as specifically recognized by or provided in Code Section 51-3-25, an owner of land owes no duty of care to keep the premises safe for entry or use by others for recreational purposes or to give any warning of a dangerous condition, use, structure, or activity on the premises to persons entering for recreational purposes.

§ 51-3-23.  Effect of invitation or permission to use land for recreation 

Except as specifically recognized by or provided in Code Section 51-3-25, an owner of land who either directly or indirectly invites or permits without charge any person to use the property for recreational purposes does not thereby:

(1) Extend any assurance that the premises are safe for any purpose;

(2) Confer upon such person the legal status of an invitee or licensee to whom a duty of care is owed; or

(3) Assume responsibility for or incur liability for any injury to person or property caused by an act of omission of such persons.

§ 51-3-24.  Applicability of Code Sections 51-3-22 and 51-3-23 to owner of land leased to state or subdivision for recreation 

Unless otherwise agreed in writing, Code Sections 51-3-22 and 51-3-23 shall be deemed applicable to the duties and liability of an owner of land leased to the state or any subdivision thereof for recreational purposes.

§ 51-3-25.  Certain liability not limited 

Nothing in this article limits in any way any liability which otherwise exists:

(1) For willful or malicious failure to guard or warn against a dangerous condition, use, structure, or activity; or 

(2) For injury suffered in any case when the owner of land charges the person or persons who enter or go on the land for the recreational use thereof, except that, in the case of land leased to the state or a subdivision thereof, any consideration received by the owner for the lease shall not be deemed a charge within the meaning of this Code section. 

§ 51-3-26.  Construction of article 

Nothing in this article shall be construed to: 

(1) Create a duty of care or ground of liability for injury to persons or property; or

(2) Relieve any person using the land of another for recreational purposes from any obligation which he may have in the absence of this article to exercise care in his use of the land and in his activities thereon or from the legal consequences of failure to employ such
care.
 

 

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New Minnesota statute attempted to eliminate releases and thankfully, might have made release law in MN better

Thankfully, law does not change anything and to some extent, helps to reinforce releases in Minnesota and releases for minors.

Several attempts were made this year to eliminate releases in Minnesota. The statute specifically includes recreational activities in its language. The result signed into law prevents releases from relieving liability for greater than ordinary negligence.

Even if the language is in the release the language is severable, which means it does not void the release, just the specific language.

However, the law does not change anything because greater than ordinary negligence, gross, will, wanton or intentional negligence, have never been covered by a release.

Here is the new statute.

JUDICIAL PROOF

CHAPTER 604.  CIVIL LIABILITY

ACTIONS INVOLVING FAULT GENERALLY

Minn. Stat. § 604.055 (2014)

604.055 WAIVER OF LIABILITY FOR NEGLIGENT CONDUCT

   Subdivision 1.  Certain agreements are void and unenforceable. –An agreement between parties for a consumer service, including a recreational activity, that purports to release, limit, or waive the liability of one party for damage, injuries, or death resulting from conduct that constitutes greater than ordinary negligence is against public policy and void and unenforceable.

The agreement, or portion thereof, is severable from a release, limitation, or waiver of liability for damage, injuries, or death resulting from conduct that constitutes ordinary negligence or for risks that are inherent in a particular activity.

Subd. 2.  Party or parties. –For the purposes of this section, “party” or “parties” includes a person, agent, servant, or employee of that party or parties, and includes a minor or another who is authorized to sign or accept the agreement on behalf of the minor.

Subd. 3.  Other void and unenforceable agreements. –This section does not prevent a court from finding that an agreement is void and unenforceable as against public policy on other grounds or under other law.

Subd. 4.  Nonapplication to certain claims. –This section does not apply to claims against the state pursuant to section 3.736 or a municipality pursuant to section 466.02.

HISTORY:  2013 c 118 s 1

NOTES:

The good news is the definition of a party to the release includes a “…minor or another who is authorized to sign or accept the agreement on behalf of the minor. That adds more support to Minnesota law, which has allowed a parent to sign away a minor’s right to sue. See Minnesota decision upholds parent’s right to sign away a minor’s right to sue.

Greater interest is the rest of the definition of a party. “…accept the agreement on behalf of the minor.” Can a Scoutmaster or Little League coach who has been told by the minor’s parents you can sign stuff for my kid, release someone from liability? Legally, it seems like a stretch, but this is the best argument I’ve ever seen for such actions.

The bill appears to be a compromise from an attempt to eliminate releases totally and after the arguments, this was the result. Thank heavens!

This does  one thing; it legislatively states that releases are OK. You can’t argue now, that releases are void in Minnesota for any legislative reason. And maybe someone other than a parent can sign away a minor’s right to sue.

What do you think? Leave a comment.

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Copyright 2013 Recreation Law (720) Edit Law

Email: Rec-law@recreation-law.com

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Mobile Site: http://m.recreation-law.com

By Recreation Law    Rec-law@recreation-law.com      James H. Moss         #Authorrank

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