So you are moving to a new town. You are worried about wither or not you will fit in and what the other kids are going to say about you when you get there?

Have no fear, Denver is a pretty easy place to fit in, especially if you are wearing climbing, skiing or any outdoor gear. You look out in street clothes in a lot of cases.

First thing you need to know, Marijuana, nothing else I really need to say.

Lot of more information after that sinks in.

Downtown streets do not run north or south. The streets run NW – SE and NE – SW.  So North and South directions down town will be confusing, but only in the downtown.

If you get lost, the mountains are to the west. At night, the big dark areas (or a big cross) are to the west.

Free Mall Shuttle: Go 2 blocks east out the front door of the convention center and you can catch a free shuttle that runs
up and down the
16th street mall. On the shuttle you can access about all the rest of downtown quite easily. (You are not allowed to skateboard or rollerblade on the mall. If you get caught you get a ticket unless you are in your 40’s or above where the cop just looks at you like you are an idiot and that says something about your age, IQ and don’t let him catch you doing this again.) The shuttle goes all the way to the RTD Light Rail station at Union Station where you can catch the A-Line to the airport.

BEER it’s real in Colorado and it has alcohol in it. Not only that you can order two at a time!!!!

Mixed Drinks, they are poured by a person and you can have two at a time.  You can even have 10 at a time if you want. A nice tip and a smile can do wonders for your drink. Meaning if the bartender does not move the bottle after the ounce has poured, you get to drink it the extra that comes out. No magic state government finger stops the flow of Wild Turkey! (I try and drink what I am!)

Colorado does not track the waiters or waitresses who serve liquor either so you don’t have to feel like you are being watched when you have a drink.

MarijuanaYup!  thought I would repeat it just for the fun of it. Smile

Cowboy hats can still be seen around town, but they are fading. Big belt buckles, (or as a friend of mine calls them
tombstone for a dead d@$k) are harder to find, thank heavens.

Vehicles & Denver: The city of Denver sees vehicles as another way to make money. They have traffic camera’s
everywhere and will issue tickets for anything, such as being in the crosswalk ($75.00). Even parking in the convention center parking garage with a tire on the yellow parking line is $75.00. Don’t drive in Denver, if you have to move around, walk or take a Pedicab or light rail. There are two pedicab companies I think Denver Pedicabs LLC and Mile High Pedicabs.

I’ve driven to Downtown Denver twice in 12 years and gotten a ticket each time. I don’t drive downtown. In fact I avoid downtown Denver. The most over the past five years I’ve been downtown is for the SIA show. If I do have to go I take RTD
Light rail
. See the map below.

B-Cycle: The easiest way to get more than a block from anywhere downtown is to rent a bike at a Denver B-Cycle Station. The easiest way is to go to the website and download the app.  The app can tell you where the stations are and how many bikes are there. Using the kiosks is easy. Find the bike you want to ride and with your cell phone number and credit card you’ll be riding in 90 seconds. There is a station right next to the light rail station at the convention center.  You can buy a 24 hour ticket which allows you to ride in multiple 30 minute increments. Check the bike back in after 30 minutes, eat dinner, get another bike and ride home.

If you get in a jam, etc., call the B-cycle number (303)825-3325. The staff is awesome and will solve your problem.

Lodging: Lodging should not be a problem in Denver. The best deals might be away from downtown. If that is the case find a hotel that is on RTD light rail. Walkout of the convention center at night, turn left and there is a light rail station and you can go anywhere. (Well not Boulder yet.). The W line has a stop behind the Sheraton which is a great hotel with a dozen bars within walking distance. (My favorite is Chad’s across the street. Use my name, it will make the staff laugh…….) There are five or more nice hotels on the E & F lines going south. Also a couple on the H & R lines, but those would be long rides.

Also south on the C or D line at the Osage Station is the Buckhorn Exchange. It serves a lot of local wildlife as food and has Colorado Liquor license #1 (this is not the place for vegetarians.)

Cycling & lodging or just cycling: If you want to ride a bike the convention center is one block to an entrance to the Cherry
Creek Bike Path. That bike trail goes South East to Aurora and Northwest to REI. At REI,  or Confluence Park, you hop on the South Platte River Trail you can ride south to Littleton or North to almost Thornton. From the North part of the South Platter River Trail you can intersect with the Clear Creek Trail and ride to Golden. By the next year you’ll be able to ride to Utah if you really want to.

Airport (DIA):   It’s big and confusing.  The best way to get downtown is on the light rail. Come off the airport train, up
the escalators and if you turn right to the end of the hall and follow the signs to the train.

Cabs are about $35, the airport is a long way from downtown. Shuttles are much cheaper. Rental cars are on the airport and still a long way away. There is no walking across the street to pick up your care. This is a big city with a big city airport. At the same time, it will be easy to get here with Five big runways.

If you have a hotel downtown, get off the A Train to the airport and walk to the free 16street mall shuttle to get to your
hotel.

Sports: Denver has every professional sports team. During the summer show you can walk to a Rockies game and in the winter to a Nuggets game. You can see indoor and outdoor Lacrosse, Soccer, Ice Hockey at different levels of play, etc., etc., etc.

COPS: You are going to see more, especially along the 16th street mall. They’re there for you. They’ll be friendly and help you out. Do something stupid or take a swing at one and you’ll find concrete is the safest part of the street! And don’t call me. Don’t be dumb and the Denver Police Department has great employees.

Costs: Hotels downtown are the same price as hotels at SLC during the show. But you’ll be paying rack rates not some you’re here so we raised the price cost. You can’t smoke in any hotel room, marijuana or other products. If you do, you’ll find a monster charge on your cleaning bill when you get home. Just like trying to steal stuff from the mini-bar. You’ll probably be
able to use your hotel points and booking rewards, hopefully.

Strip joints. There are several down town and you get to see things, just not use your imagination. If you want to see
everything, you can’t drink.

Jail: got me, I don’t do criminal work and using my name won’t get you anything except a higher bond or my jail time.

Other Activities: You already know about them because this is your industry and your sport.

There are no dress codes in any restaurant in Denver. So you can fit in whatever you are wearing at the show. Here are some notes that will make your first day of school or Outdoor Retailer easier.

I am curious where the outdoor demo is going to be held. There are three big lakes on the outskirts of Denver and several small ones in Denver. Winter I’d guess Echo Mountain just outside of Evergreen, Loveland or Eldora ski areas.

More coming. Stay Tuned or send me your questions.

 Denver Light Rail Map

 

clip_image002

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Trade Show season for the outdoor industry is starting. The big question: What is the future of tradeshows?

Tradeshows make a statement as well as keep an industry going. We need tradeshows.

No denying that tradeshows are having issues. The numbers of attendees are dropping and the numbers of people who are “buyers” are disappearing.

However, it does not matter how many people show up at a tradeshow as long as the right people show up.

I believe in National tradeshows.

They are important because they allow small new businesses to introduce themselves to the world. Jetboil and Vibram Five Finger shoes are recent examples. Those are designs or ideas that could not make it without an introduction to a national audience. You can get lucky and have a magazine or website put your product out there, but a tradeshow is your best bet. In fact, most magazines go to tradeshows to find those new great items.

Yes, there are other shows besides a national trade show, consumer shows, rep shows, etc.. However, finding and exhibiting at those shows for a new manufacturer is difficult and expensive. For the rep shows if you don’t have a rep, you can’t get a booth. Very few reps are going to pick up an unknown line. Consequently, the new manufacturer has no way to get his product introduced to the masses without a national show.

A national show gives a new product or a new company the opportunity to reach national retailers, national media and the world.

Legal & Risk Management reasons for Tradeshows

Tradeshows also allow manufacturers and retailers to exchange ideas, which make the industry better. Tradeshows allow interaction between parties, which raises the standard of care for an industry.

Risk management ideas are exchanged between everyone at tradeshows. Everyone attending learns something and sometimes one thing is enough.

Tradeshows allow “old guys” to talk about their past, how the mountain was higher and the snow was deeper on every peak we climbed.

Sales ideas are traded at tradeshows.

Retailers leave tradeshows with new ideas on how to sell new and old products. One retailer tells of their success with a marketing idea to an exhibitor, and that exhibitor passes the ideas on.

This occurs when reps are in their territories, but not as consistently, and they are sometimes forgotten in those long drives from one store to the next.

Tradeshows provide tons of benefits.

Tradeshows also make statements. A tradeshow tells the industry it is vibrant and healthy. It generates interest both in the attendees and those that do not attend and consumers. Big trade shows get consumers online because they know they can see the latest and greatest.

Money

Tradeshows cost a lot of money, to put on and to attend. That amount is relative. If it costs too much to attend you don’t go, and if it costs too much to put on, you won’t.

SIA suffered major traffic loss when the show moved to Denver. Compared to Las Vegas, Denver is a very expensive town to fly into and stay. Salt Lake City has the same reputation during OR week. I know a few retailers who have given up and just fly in and fly out the same day, if the come at all.

And those of you that argue one city is better than another to host a trade show, there is really only cost issue. Yes, Las Vegas sucks to bicycle around, but you are not spending big bucks to go cycle. Inside the tradeshow the air, the lights and the exhibits, all seem to be identical in Denver, Las Vegas and Salt Lake City. It does not matter where the tradeshow is located as long as it works for the attendees.

Not Exhibitors? If you get enough buyers, the exhibitors will show up on mars.

·         The cost for retailers has to make sense.

·         The time to register and book a trip, including lodging has to be easy.

·         The tradeshow has to occur at a time when the retailers know how much money they will have to spend next year and what sold and did not sell this year.

·         The exhibitors must have a value in attending the tradeshow and that means a bottom line they make more money than they spend.

I don’t have any answers really. I do have concerns. I believe we need trade shows for more reasons than just buying and selling. At the same time, without buying and selling there is no reason for a tradeshow.

See you at the next tradeshow.

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Oregon Ski Area Statutes

Oregon Ski Area Statutes

TITLE 3.  REMEDIES AND SPECIAL ACTIONS AND PROCEEDINGS

CHAPTER 30.  ACTIONS AND SUITS IN PARTICULAR CASES

SKIING ACTIVITIES

(2005) 30.970. Definitions for ORS 30.970 to 30.990.

As used in ORS 30.970 to 30.990:

(1)“Inherent risks of skiing” includes, but is not limited to, those dangers or conditions which are an integral part of the sport, such as changing weather conditions, variations or steepness in terrain, snow or ice conditions, surface or subsurface conditions, bare spots, creeks and gullies, forest growth, rocks, stumps, lift towers and other structures and their components, collisions with other skiers and a skier’s failure to ski within the skier’s own ability.

(2)“Injury” means any personal injury or property damage or loss.

(3)“Skier” means any person who is in a ski area for the purpose of engaging in the sport of skiing or who rides as a passenger on any ski lift device.

(4)“Ski area” means any area designated and maintained by a ski area operator for skiing.

(5)“Ski area operator” means those persons, and their agents, officers, employees or representatives, who operate a ski area.

30.975. Skiers assume certain risks.

In accordance with ORS 31.600 and notwithstanding ORS 31.620 (2), an individual who engages in the sport of skiing, alpine or nordic, accepts and assumes the inherent risks of skiing insofar as they are reasonably obvious, expected or necessary.

30.980. Notice to ski area operator of injury to skier; injuries resulting in death; statute of limitations; informing skiers of notice requirements.

(1)A ski area operator shall be notified of any injury to a skier by registered or certified mail within 180 days after the injury or within 180 days after the skier discovers, or reasonably should have discovered, such injury.

(2)When an injury results in a skier’s death, the required notice of the injury may be presented to the ski area operator by or on behalf of the personal representative of the deceased, or any person who may, under ORS 30.020, maintain an action for the wrongful death of the skier, within 180 days after the date of the death which resulted from the injury. However, if the skier whose injury resulted in death presented a notice to the ski area operator that would have been sufficient under this section had the skier lived, notice of the death to the ski area operator is not necessary.

(3)An action against a ski area operator to recover damages for injuries to a skier shall be commenced within two years of the date of the injuries. However, ORS 12.160 and 12.190 apply to such actions.

(4)Failure to give notice as required by this section bars a claim for injuries or wrongful death unless:

(a)  The ski area operator had knowledge of the injury or death within the 180-day period after its occurrence;

(b)The skier or skier’s beneficiaries had good cause for failure to give notice as required by this section; or

(c)  The ski area operator failed to comply with subsection (5) of this section.

(5)Ski area operators shall give to skiers, in a manner reasonably calculated to inform, notice of the requirements for notifying a ski area operator of injury and the effect of a failure to provide such notice under this section.

30.985. Duties of skiers; effect of failure to comply.

(1)         Skiers shall have duties which include but are not limited to the following:

(a)  Skiers who ski in any area not designated for skiing within the permit area assume the inherent risks thereof.

(b)Skiers shall be the sole judges of the limits of their skills and their ability to meet and overcome the inherent risks of skiing and shall maintain reasonable control of speed and course.

(c)  Skiers shall abide by the directions and instructions of the ski area operator.

(d)Skiers shall familiarize themselves with posted information on location and degree of difficulty of trails and slopes to the extent reasonably possible before skiing on any slope or trail.

(e)  Skiers shall not cross the uphill track of any surface lift except at points clearly designated by the ski area operator.

(f)  Skiers shall not overtake any other skier except in such a manner as to avoid contact and shall grant the right of way to the overtaken skier.

(g)  Skiers shall yield to other skiers when entering a trail or starting downhill.

(h)Skiers must wear retention straps or other devices to prevent runaway skis.

(i)   Skiers shall not board rope tows, wire rope tows, j-bars, t-bars, ski lifts or other similar devices unless they have sufficient ability to use the devices, and skiers shall follow any written or verbal instructions that are given regarding the devices.

(j)   Skiers, when involved in a skiing accident, shall not depart from the ski area without leaving their names and addresses if reasonably possible.

(k)A skier who is injured should, if reasonably possible, give notice of the injury to the ski area operator before leaving the ski area.

(L) Skiers shall not embark or disembark from a ski lift except at designated areas or by the authority of the ski area operator.

(2)         Violation of any of the duties of skiers set forth in subsection (1) of this section entitles the ski area operator to withdraw the violator’s privilege of skiing.

30.990. Operators required to give skiers notice of duties.

Ski area operators shall give notice to skiers of their duties under ORS 30.985 in a manner reasonably calculated to inform skiers of those duties.

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Oregon Skier Safety Act

Oregon Skier Safety Act

OREGON REVISED STATUTES

TITLE 3 REMEDIES AND SPECIAL ACTIONS AND PROCEEDINGS 

Chapter 30 – Actions and Suits in Particular Cases 

SKIING ACTIVITIES 

GO TO OREGON REVISED STATUTES ARCHIVE DIRECTORY

ORS § 30.970 (2011)

30.970 Definitions for ORS 30.970 to 30.990.

    As used in ORS 30.970 to 30.990:

(1) “Inherent risks of skiing” includes, but is not limited to, those dangers or conditions which are an integral part of the sport, such as changing weather conditions, variations or steepness in terrain, snow or ice conditions, surface or subsurface conditions, bare spots, creeks and gullies, forest growth, rocks, stumps, lift towers and other structures and their components, collisions with other skiers and a skier’s failure to ski within the skier’s own ability.

(2) “Injury” means any personal injury or property damage or loss.

(3) “Skier” means any person who is in a ski area for the purpose of engaging in the sport of skiing or who rides as a passenger on any ski lift device.

(4) “Ski area” means any area designated and maintained by a ski area operator for skiing.

(5) “Ski area operator” means those persons, and their agents, officers, employees or representatives, who operate a ski area.

HISTORY: 1979 c.665 § 1

NOTES OF DECISIONS

Where plaintiff did not argue to trial court that her injuries were caused by combination of inherent risk of skiing and operator negligence which would have made doctrine of comparative fault applicable, trial court did not err in instructing jury that if plaintiff’s injury was caused by inherent risk of skiing, plaintiff could not recover. Jessup v. Mt. Bachelor, Inc., 101 Or App 670, 792 P2d 1232 (1990), Sup Ct review denied

Vicarious liability of ski area operator for negligence of its employee is not removed solely by fact that employee is skier. Nolan v. Mt. Bachelor, Inc., 317 Or 328, 856 P2d 305 (1993)

CASE NOTES

1. When both an inherent risk and a ski area operator’s negligence contribute to a skier’s injury, the questions of liability and apportionment of fault are for the trier of fact. Nolan v. Mt. Bachelor, Inc., 115 Ore. App. 27, 836 P.2d 770, 1992 Ore. App. LEXIS 1681 (1992), affirmed by, remanded by 317 Ore. 328, 856 P.2d 305, 1993 Ore. LEXIS 115 (1993).

2. It was error for trial court to submit jury instruction form in action brought under Oregon skiing activities law in which jury was instructed that if the injury, if any, was caused by an inherent risk of skiing which was reasonably obvious, expected, or necessary, its verdict must be for defendant; the skiing activities law contemplates the possibility that a skier’s injury might result in part from an inherent risk of skiing and in part from the skier’s own or another’s negligence. Nolan v. Mt. Bachelor, Inc., 317 Ore. 328, 856 P.2d 305, 1993 Ore. LEXIS 115 (1993).

3. Given statute’s reference to Or. Rev. Stat. § 31.600, the comparative negligence statute, the legislature contemplated the possibility that skier’s injury might result in part from and inherent risk of skiing and in part from the skier’s own or another’s negligence. Nolan v. Mt. Bachelor, Inc., 317 Ore. 328, 856 P.2d 305, 1993 Ore. LEXIS 115 (1993).

4. Skier is barred from recovery against ski area operator for injury caused solely by an inherent risk of skiing, but if injury is caused by a combination of inherent risk of skiing and operator negligence, doctrine of comparative fault would apply. Jessup v. Mt. Bachelor, Inc., 101 Ore. App. 670, 792 P.2d 1232, 1990 Ore. App. LEXIS 526 (1990), review denied by 310 Ore. 475, 799 P.2d 646 (1990).

5. Or. Rev. Stat. § 30.970 shields ski area operators from liability for collisions between customers, not from accountability for a collision caused by an employee’s negligence. Nolan v. Mt. Bachelor, Inc., 115 Ore. App. 27, 836 P.2d 770, 1992 Ore. App. LEXIS 1681 (1992), affirmed by, remanded by 317 Ore. 328, 856 P.2d 305, 1993 Ore. LEXIS 115 (1993).

30.975 Skiers assume certain risks.

    In accordance with ORS 31.600 and notwithstanding ORS 31.620 (2), an individual who engages in the sport of skiing, alpine or nordic, accepts and assumes the inherent risks of skiing insofar as they are reasonably obvious, expected or necessary.

HISTORY: 1979 c.665 § 2

NOTES OF DECISIONS

Where plaintiff did not argue to trial court that her injuries were caused by combination of inherent risk of skiing and operator negligence which would have made doctrine of comparative fault applicable, trial court did not err in instructing jury that if plaintiff’s injury was caused by inherent risk of skiing, plaintiff could not recover. Jessup v. Mt. Bachelor, Inc., 101 Or App 670, 792 P2d 1232 (1990), Sup Ct review denied

[Former] ORS 18.470 allows jury to consider comparative negligence of skier’s own or another’s negligence as well as inherent risk of skiing. Nolan v. Mt. Bachelor, Inc., 115 Or App 27, 836 P2d 770 (1992), aff’d 317 Or 328, 856 P2d 305 (1993)

Collision between skier and ski instructor employed by ski area operator was not collision with another skier that skier accepts as inherent risk of skiing. Nolan v. Mt. Bachelor, Inc., 317 Or 328, 856 P2d 305 (1993)

Assumption of risk defense is available only to ski area operators. Stiles v. Freemotion, Inc., 185 Or App 393, 59 P3d 548 (2002), Sup Ct review denied

CASE NOTES

1. It was error for trial court to submit jury instruction form in action brought under Oregon skiing activities law in which jury was instructed that if the injury, if any, was caused by an inherent risk of skiing which was reasonably obvious, expected, or necessary, its verdict must be for defendant; the skiing activities law contemplates the possibility that a skier’s injury might result in part from an inherent risk of skiing and in part form the skier’s own or another’s negligence. Nolan v. Mt. Bachelor, Inc., 317 Ore. 328, 856 P.2d 305, 1993 Ore. LEXIS 115 (1993).

2. Or. Rev. Stat. § 30.975 insulates a defendant ski operator from liability resulting from the inherent risks of skiing and bars a plaintiff’s claim only if the injury is due solely to those inherent risks; to the extent that injury is due to negligence of a ski operator’s employees, this section does not bar a plaintiff’s recovery. Pierce v. Mt. Hood Meadows Oregon, Ltd., 118 Ore. App. 450, 847 P.2d 909, 1993 Ore. App. LEXIS 262 (1993), review denied by 317 Ore. 583, 859 P.2d 540 (1993).

3. Skier is barred from recovery against ski area operator for injury caused solely by an inherent risk of skiing, but if injury is caused by a combination of inherent risk of skiing and operator negligence, doctrine of comparative fault would apply. Jessup v. Mt. Bachelor, Inc., 101 Ore. App. 670, 792 P.2d 1232, 1990 Ore. App. LEXIS 526 (1990), review denied by 310 Ore. 475, 799 P.2d 646 (1990).

30.980 Notice to ski area operator of injury to skier; injuries resulting in death; statute of limitations; informing skiers of notice requirements.

    (1) A ski area operator shall be notified of any injury to a skier by registered or certified mail within 180 days after the injury or within 180 days after the skier discovers, or reasonably should have discovered, such injury.

(2) When an injury results in a skier’s death, the required notice of the injury may be presented to the ski area operator by or on behalf of the personal representative of the deceased, or any person who may, under ORS 30.020, maintain an action for the wrongful death of the skier, within 180 days after the date of the death which resulted from the injury. However, if the skier whose injury resulted in death presented a notice to the ski area operator that would have been sufficient under this section had the skier lived, notice of the death to the ski area operator is not necessary.

(3) An action against a ski area operator to recover damages for injuries to a skier shall be commenced within two years of the date of the injuries. However, ORS 12.160 and 12.190 apply to such actions.

(4) Failure to give notice as required by this section bars a claim for injuries or wrongful death unless:

(a) The ski area operator had knowledge of the injury or death within the 180-day period after its occurrence;

(b) The skier or skier’s beneficiaries had good cause for failure to give notice as required by this section; or

(c) The ski area operator failed to comply with subsection (5) of this section.

(5) Ski area operators shall give to skiers, in a manner reasonably calculated to inform, notice of the requirements for notifying a ski area operator of injury and the effect of a failure to provide such notice under this section.

HISTORY: 1979 c.665 § 3

CASE NOTES

1. It was error for trial court to submit jury instruction form in action brought under Oregon skiing activities law in which jury was instructed that if the injury, if any, was caused by and inherent risk of skiing which was reasonably obvious, expected, or necessary, its verdict must be for defendant; the skiing activities law contemplates the possibility that a skier’s injury might result in part from an inherent risk of skiing and in part from the skier’s own or another’s negligence. Nolan v. Mt. Bachelor, Inc., 317 Ore. 328, 856 P.2d 305, 1993 Ore. LEXIS 115 (1993).

30.985 Duties of skiers; effect of failure to comply.

    (1) Skiers shall have duties which include but are not limited to the following:

(a) Skiers who ski in any area not designated for skiing within the permit area assume the inherent risks thereof.

(b) Skiers shall be the sole judges of the limits of their skills and their ability to meet and overcome the inherent risks of skiing and shall maintain reasonable control of speed and course.

(c) Skiers shall abide by the directions and instructions of the ski area operator.

(d) Skiers shall familiarize themselves with posted information on location and degree of difficulty of trails and slopes to the extent reasonably possible before skiing on any slope or trail.

(e) Skiers shall not cross the uphill track of any surface lift except at points clearly designated by the ski area operator.

(f) Skiers shall not overtake any other skier except in such a manner as to avoid contact and shall grant the right of way to the overtaken skier.

(g) Skiers shall yield to other skiers when entering a trail or starting downhill.

(h) Skiers must wear retention straps or other devices to prevent runaway skis.

(i) Skiers shall not board rope tows, wire rope tows, j-bars, t-bars, ski lifts or other similar devices unless they have sufficient ability to use the devices, and skiers shall follow any written or verbal instructions that are given regarding the devices.

(j) Skiers, when involved in a skiing accident, shall not depart from the ski area without leaving their names and addresses if reasonably possible.

(k) A skier who is injured should, if reasonably possible, give notice of the injury to the ski area operator before leaving the ski area.

(L) Skiers shall not embark or disembark from a ski lift except at designated areas or by the authority of the ski area operator.

(2) Violation of any of the duties of skiers set forth in subsection (1) of this section entitles the ski area operator to withdraw the violator’s privilege of skiing.

HISTORY: 1979 c.665 § 4

CASE NOTES

1. It was error for trial court to submit jury instruction form in action brought under Oregon skiing activities law in which jury was instructed that if the injury, if any, was caused by an inherent risk of skiing which was reasonably obvious, expected, or necessary, its verdict must be for defendant; the skiing activities law contemplates the possibility that a skier’s injury might result in part from an inherent risk of skiing and in part form the skier’s own or another’s negligence. Nolan v. Mt. Bachelor, Inc., 317 Ore. 328, 856 P.2d 305, 1993 Ore. LEXIS 115 (1993).

30.990 Operators required to give skiers notice of duties.

    Ski area operators shall give notice to skiers of their duties under ORS 30.985 in a manner reasonably calculated to inform skiers of those duties.

HISTORY: 1979 c.665 § 5

1. It was error for trial court to submit jury instruction from in action brought under Oregon skiing activities law in which jury was instructed that if the injury, if any, was caused by an inherent risk of skiing which was reasonably obvious, expected, or necessary, its verdict must be for defendant; the skiing activities law contemplates the possibility that a skier’s injury might result in part from an inherent risk of skiing and in part from the skier’s own or another’s negligence. Nolan v. Mt. Bachelor, Inc., 317 Ore. 328, 856 P.2d 305, 1993 Ore. LEXIS 115 (1993).

1. 36 Willamette L. Rev. 83, COMMENT: CLEANING UP THE OREGON REVISED STATUTES: A MODEST PROPOSAL ON PUBLIC BODIES.

 


Summer Outdoor Retailer 2013 Review

Most Exhibitors had a good show despite the fact many slept on floors

Summer Outdoor Retailer 2013 is over. Overall attendance was down (no matter what the reports) but the majority of exhibitors I talked to had a good show. Some a great show.

It does not matter how many people attend, as long as the right people attend.

Attendance did jump around 4:30 Pm every day when the free beer would flow. It was sort of comical to be standing in an empty aisle and see the aisle fill up slowly, all with people holding beer.

New Stuff

GCI Outdoors

Ever thought you would take a rocking chair with you. GCI Outdoors Figured it out.

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The rocker rests on a flat base and works off a pivot. The control is based on two shock absorbers on the back. It was very comfortable, and hard to get out of. You sat down and started to rock and relax!

Thule

The Thule booth looked like it belonged at Interbike. Besides a lot of bike accessory bags Thule had 2 new bike “boxes.” Both used an integrated bike stand to hold the bike. When you got to your destination you could pull out the stand and use it to put your bike together and tune your bike.

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Mountaineers Books

Mountaineers Books had a display of the Legends and Lore series. If you can read and love great mountaineering literature pick up these books. Mountaineers has grabbed and republished some of the greatest books of our time.

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Mad Water

Mad Water has a waterproof bag that zips. I’ve owned one for a year and fell in love with it. The zipper is tight and tough but not so tough you are worried about tearing the bag apart. The bags also have a purge value which makes getting the air out easy. Right now the bags with zippers are small but the line is getting bigger.

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Rola

Ever heard of Rola? Me either but one thing caught my eye, their hitch mount. Every state has a law that says anything extending beyond the back of the taillights by more than 36 inches must have a light or a red flag. All those bike racks, cages, boxes, etc., except this one will set you up for a ticket. Rola integrated taillights into their box. Really smart move.

I suspect a lot more people are going to know Rola in the future.

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Sawyer

Sawyer has done it again. Sawyer was the first company to make a water filter using kidney dialysis technology. Nothing is a smooth, slick or safe as Sawyer’s filters. They have a new filter that is smaller and even easier to use. It will wear out after 100000 gallons…..

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The beautiful girl does not come with the filter. You are on your own for that.

Blue Ridge Chair Works

The best item at the show for those of us more attuned to football and beer, or softball and beer, or just beer. Blue Ridge Chair Works has integrated a bottle opening on the bottom side of their chair seats. Sit in a very comfortable chair, reach under the seat and your beer is open. Slick. I have one of the older models which is too comfortable. I got a hand held model….bottle opener.

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Here are some other things which I’m not sure how to comment on……

Float down the river or on the lake and relax…

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Rowing frame for SUP’s that moves your feet not your butt?

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Over all a good show if you had a hotel room. If you did not, the show was a nightmare. But then any time you are in Utah and part of the outdoor recreation industry you are not sure how the world turns backwards.

Support the Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance to help offset Outdoor Retailer putting money into the pockets of people opposed to outdoor recreation.

What do you think? Leave a comment.

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Copyright 2013 Recreation Law (720) Edit Law

Email: Rec-law@recreation-law.com

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By Recreation Law    Rec-law@recreation-law.com      James H. Moss         #Authorrank

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Outdoor Retailer (and probably Interbike) new Badge Bar Codes can probably be read from your phone

The system is new so bring your paper copy until we know for sure

I was able to confirm today the possibility of paperless entry into the Nielsen Outdoor Shows Outdoor Retailer and Interbike. The system has not been fully tested yet so bring your paper copies of your badges until you know for sure.

This is pretty exciting with the possibility of dropping another layer of paper from the tradeshow industry.

Cool

What do you think? Leave a comment.

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Outdoor Retailer Winter 2012 best advertising campaign – possibly ever!

Also the one that provided a lot of entertainment or fear in the men’s restrooms!

Sole inserts (or orthotics) had the best marketing campaign at winter OR.

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Seriously, these were everywhere. In stalls, above urinals, next to the sinks these were everywhere. If you did not know about Sole when you left OR, you either spent less than an hour there or had the biggest bladder in the world.

Now if you weren’t just scared straight by the first bumper sticker, you were at least reassured by this one.

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Thanks Sole for providing us something to talk about in the restrooms at Winter OR.

What do you think? Leave a comment.

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