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Backcountry skier sues in Small Claims Court in San Miguel County Colorado for injuries she received when a backcountry snowboarder triggered an Avalanche that injured her.

The defendant snowboarder had agreed not to descend the slope until the lower parties had called and told them they had cleared the area. The defendant failed to wait and admitted he had triggered the Avalanche.

State: Colorado, San Miguel Small Claims Court

Plaintiff: Jayleen Troutwin

Defendant: Christopher Parke

Plaintiff Claims: Negligence

Defendant Defenses:

Holding: for the plaintiff

Year: 2017

Facts

Under Colorado law, you can create a duty when you agree to act or not act. Here the defendant created a duty when he agreed not to descend the slope until he had received a phone call from the first party that they had cleared the danger area.

This is a first of its kind suit that I have found, and the judge’s decision in this case is striking in its clarity and reasoning. At the same time, it might open up backcountry injuries to more litigation. The facts that created this lawsuit are specific in how the duty was created, and that will be rare in 90% of the backcountry accidents.

I have attached the written decision of the court to this analysis, and I encourage you to read it.

Facts: taken from the complaint, the CAIC Report and The Order of Judgment

The plaintiff was skiing out of bounds in Bear Creek outside of the Telluride Ski Area. While skiing they ran into the defendant and his friend. The defendant and friend were not ready to go, so the plaintiff and friend took off. The plaintiff and friend stated they would call the defendant when they were out of the danger zone at the bottom of the chute they both intended to ski.

The defendant and his friend did not wait, and triggered an avalanche. Plaintiff was still repelling when the avalanche hit her sweeping her off the rappel, and she fell 1200 feet down the slope riding the avalanche. She survived on top of the snow with several injuries.

The defendant admitted that it was his fault, and he would pay for the plaintiff’s medical bills. He made one payment and no others. The Plaintiff’s medical bills were in excess of $50,000. However, she still skied out after the incident.

The plaintiff sued the defendant in Small Claims Court. Small Claims court is for parties without attorneys, and the judge can grant a maximum of $7500.00 in damages.

Analysis: making sense of the law based on these facts.

Normally, participants in sporting or outdoor recreation events assume the risks inherent in the sport. Avalanches are an inherent risk of skiing. The Colorado Supreme Court has stated that in Colorado Supreme Court rules that an inbounds Avalanche is an inherent risk assumed by skiers based upon the Colorado Skier Safety Act.

Under most circumstances, the plaintiff in this situation would have assumed the risk of her injuries. What sets this decision apart was the agreement at the top of the mountain between the two groups of people. One group agreed not to descend into the chute until the other group had cleared the chute.

This creates an assumed duty on the part of the defendant. By agreeing to the acts, the plaintiff assumed a duty to the defendant.

The assumed duty doctrine “must be predicated on two factual findings.” “A plaintiff must first show that the defendant, either through its affirmative acts or through a promise to act, undertook to render a service that was reasonably calculated to prevent the type of harm that befell the plaintiff.” “Second, a plaintiff must also show either that he relied on the defendant to perform the service or that defendant’s undertaking increased plaintiff’s risk.”

This assumed duty was done specifically to prevent injuries to the other skiers. The skiers also relied on this agreement when they skied down the slope.

This Court, therefore, finds that the Defendant assumed a duty of care in agreeing not to ski his chosen route while Troutwin and Hope were still skiing theirs in an effort to avoid a skier-triggered avalanche.

Thus, when the defendant started down the chute, he violated the agreed to duty of care to the skiers below them.

The next issue to prove negligence in this case is causation or proximate causation. The breach of the duty by the defendant must be related to the injury the plaintiff received. The court simply found but for the actions of the defendant, the injuries of the plaintiff would not have occurred.

The defendant admitted triggering the avalanche, and the avalanche is what swept the plaintiff off the rappel.

The defendant raised two defenses at trial. Comparative Negligence and Assumption of Risk.

Comparative negligence asks, “did the actions of the plaintiff create or expose the plaintiff to an unreasonable risk of harm?” Comparative negligence is applied to reduce the damages the plaintiff might receive if both parties are at fault in causing the injuries to the plaintiff.

The defendant argued the plaintiff assumed the risk of her injuries and was a partial cause of her injuries when she did not use a backup device on her rappel.

The court looked at the failure to use a backup system on rappel as the same as failing to wear a seatbelt in a car or failing to wear a helmet while riding a motorcycle. Both have been determined by the Colorado Supreme Court to not be a component contributing to comparative negligence.

The reasoning behind this is simple. The plaintiff should not be required to determine in advance the negligence of any third party. Meaning it is not the injured parties’ duty, in advance to determine and then deal with any possible negligence of any other person. If that was the case, you could never leave the house because you never guessed what injury you might have received.

…[f]irst, a defendant should not diminish the consequences of his negligence by the failure of the injured party to anticipate defendant’s negligence in causing the accident itself. Second, a defense premised on an injured party’s failure to wear a protective helmet would result in a windfall to tortfeasors who pay only partially for the harm their negligence caused. Third, allowing the defense would lead to a veritable battle of experts as to what injuries would have or have not been avoided had the plaintiff been wearing a helmet.

The court found that neither comparative negligence, nor assumption of the risk applied to these facts and were not a defense to the plaintiff’s claims.

The court also added a section to its opinion about the future of backcountry skiing and the Policy issues this decision might create. It is well-written and worth quoting here.

51. This Court has determined that Parke’s duty of care is a result of his express assumption of that duty, rather than broader policy concerns that are typically addressed in protracted discussions of legal duty. It is nevertheless, worth noting that given the increasing popularity of backcountry skiing and skiing into Bear Creek, in particular, the risk of skiers triggering avalanches above one-another is likely increasing. In situations where skiers have no knowledge of whether a group is below, the legal outcome of an accident may be different than the result reached here. A liability rule that thus encourages skiers to avoid investigating whether their descent might pose a risk to those below feels averse to sound public policy. Communication and coordination between groups of backcountry skiers is surely good practice.

52. But meaningful communication is not necessarily impossible in these circumstances. This Court is swayed by the availability of radios like that which Troutwin and Hope carried. These radios are a communication option that appears more reliable than cellular telephones. Perhaps if they become more prevalent, more communication between parties will take place. And it follows and is foreseeable that other communications platforms or safety standards will develop to address this specific risk. The liability rule discussed here does not necessarily foreclose those developments.

53. The ethics and liability rules associated with backcountry skiing are likely to continue to evolve as its popularity increases and safety standards emerge. The law is likely to continue to evolve in kind.

It is refreshing to see a judge look at the broader aspect of his or her decision as it applies to an evolving sport.

The court found that the plaintiff suffered $9,660.00 in damages. The jurisdictional limit a Colorado Small Claims court can issue is a maximum of $7,500.00, which is the amount the plaintiff was awarded.

So Now What?

If you say you are going to do something, do it. If you say you are going to wait, wait. It is that simple.

More importantly, litigation has now entered the realm of backcountry skiing. Will it create more litigation, probably? Backcountry skiers who have no health insurance or no income while they recover will be looking for a way to get hospital bill collectors off their phone and pizza coming to the front door. Worse, health insurance companies will look at a way through their subrogation clauses to try to recover the money they pay out on behalf of their insureds.

At the same time, based upon these facts, the defendant was the sole cause of the plaintiff’s injuries not because he triggered an avalanche, but because he agreed not to trigger an avalanche.

Documents Attached:

Notice, Claim and Summons to Appear for a Trial.   

Answer

Trial Exhibits 1 through 9

Exhibit 1

Exhibit 2

Exhibit 3

Exhibit 4

Exhibit 5

Exhibit 6

Exhibit 7

Exhibit 8

Exhibit 9

Order of Judgment

What do you think? Leave a comment.

Copyright 2017 Recreation Law (720) 334 8529

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Survey of Small Businesses Along Continental Divide Trail Finds that Trail Users are an Economic Boon to Communities

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One-of-a-Kind Survey of Small Businesses Along Continental Divide Trail Finds that Trail Users are an Economic Boon to Communities

Continental Divide Trail Coalition surveys small businesses in four states—including Colorado—and 16 rural communities to assess trail’s economic impact. Business owners say trail users play an important role in their economic well-being

A one-of-a-kind survey of small business owners in 16 communities near the Continental Divide Trail throughout Colorado, New Mexico, Idaho and Wyoming shows the trail, the public lands it travels through and the hikers that use it are a vital and growing part of the economic activity in those towns.

The survey of 71 small business owners, conducted by the Continental Divide Trail Coalition (CDTC)—a nonprofit organization committed to constructing, promoting, and protecting the trail—during the fall of 2017, shows that small business owners see a strong correlation between the success and promotion of the trail and their bottom lines. The survey—the first of its kind to poll small business owners in small, often remote communities along the trail that runs from Canada to Mexico—unequivocally shows that business owners feel the trail puts their communities on the map as an outdoor recreation hub and draws trail users who spend money at restaurants, hotels, gear shops, grocery stores and other places of business in their communities:

  • 77 percent of small business owners who responded to the survey say trail users spend money at their business and have had a positive impact on their business
  • 88 percent say that trail users spend money in their community and have a positive impact on business in general

“The Continental Divide Trail and the hikers that use it are vital to my business. We are able to get through the winter because of the massive number of hikers coming through in the summer,” said Melanie Garr, the owner of Simple Lodge & Hostel in Salida, Colo., one of the communities surveyed. “Considering the positive impact the trail and the people who use it have on my business and our community, it is alarming to see the president roll back protections for public lands in the West. This is our livelihood and decisions like that threaten it.”

Business owners also report economic benefits since their towns gained the Continental Divide Trail Community designation from the CDTC. The designation recognizes communities that have committed to promoting and protecting the trail and providing an inviting environment for trail hikers:

  • 67 percent report seeing an increase in trail users coming through their communities
  • 42 percent report seeing an increase in traffic from trail users in their businesses
  • 39 percent report an overall increase in business in their community
  • 61 percent see an increase in awareness of their community as an outdoor recreation hub

“Small businesses keep local communities and economies thriving by providing jobs, financial stability and valuable services, and their collective activity boosts our national economy. The decision to reduce protections for the Bears Ears and Grand Staircase Escalante national monuments sent shockwaves through communities that rely on public lands for their economic wellbeing,” said Teresa Martinez, executive director of the Continental Divide Trail Coalition. “Small business owners in these towns are consistent in their belief that the Continental Divide Trail stimulates the economies of their communities. Our leaders must pursue policies that help these small businesses maintain and grow a healthy bottom line by preserving and enhancing the trail and the public lands it traverses.”

The survey provides a first-hand account of what economic reports on recreation have found—such as the 2017 Outdoor Industry Association report that shows the recreation economy drives $887 billion in consumer spending every year and supports 7.6 million jobs. As the popularity of the trail increases, Martinez expects the economic impact to grow.

“We have documented an exponential increase in the number of long-distance hikers attempting to hike from one end of the trail to the other over the past four years,” Martinez said. “In the first year, we documented 50 thru-hikers. In 2017, there were more than 300. We expect the numbers to keep growing and the positive economic impact on communities to grow with them.”

Seeing the positive economic impact the trail has on their businesses, it is not surprising that the survey also reveals that small business owners in trail communities believe protecting their region’s natural assets will enhance local economies.

A vast 88 percent of small business owners say that protecting, promoting and enhancing the Continental Divide Trail is important to the well-being of businesses, jobs and their community’s economy. An overwhelming 95 percent say that protecting, promoting and enhancing public lands in general is important to the well-being of businesses, jobs, and their community’s economy.

The entrepreneurs owned a variety of businesses: 36 percent own a hotel or motel; 28 percent own a restaurant, bar or similar business; 22 percent own an outdoor clothing or gear store; 6 percent own an outdoor guide service; 4 percent own a grocery or convenience store; and 4 percent own an RV park or campground.

The vast majority of respondents are small businesses with 98 percent reporting 50 or fewer employees during the peak season. Indeed, 71 percent have 10 or fewer employees.

Click here to ready the survey report.

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Recall: Folding Brompton bicycles

Hazard: The bicycle’s bottom bracket can break during use, posing a fall hazard.

Remedy: Replace

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled bicycles and contact an authorized Brompton dealer for free installation of a new bottom bracket cartridge.

Consumer Contact: Brompton at 800-578-6785 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday or online at http://www.brompton.com and click on Voluntary recall for more information.

Pictures available here: https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2018/Brompton-Bicycle-Recalls-Bicycles-Due-To-Fall-Hazard



Recall Details

Units: About 8,400 (In addition, about 1,300 were sold in Canada)

Description: This recall involves Folding Brompton bicycles with “Brompton” printed on the bicycle’s frame. Only bicycles with serial numbers 1403284144 to 1705150001 (manufactured from April 2014 through May 2017) are included in the recall. The serial number is printed on a curved plate or sticker, applied to the rear of the seat tube. If the barcode sticker on the bike is faded or rubbed off, submit the six digit frame number stamped into the metal plate behind the bottom bracket and seat tube via email to support@brompton.com to receive the correlating serial number.

Incidents/Injuries: None reported

Sold At: Specialty bicycle stores and Brompton dealers nationwide from April 2014 through September 2017 for between $1,200 and $3,000

Importer(s): Brompton Bicyle Inc., of Brooklyn, New York

Manufactured In: Great Britain

Retailers: If you are a retailer of a recalled product you have a duty to notify your customers of a recall. If you can, email your clients or include the recall information in your next marketing communication to your clients. Post any Recall Poster at your stores and contact the manufacturer to determine how you will handle any recalls.

For more information on this see:

For Retailers

Recalls Call for Retailer Action

A recall leads to lawsuits because injuries are connected to the product being recalled thus a lawsuit. Plaintiff’s hope the three can be connected

Combination of a Products Liability statute, an Expert Witness Report that was just not direct enough and odd facts holds a retailer liable as manufacture for product defect.

Product Liability takes a different turn. You must pay attention, just not rely on the CPSC.

Retailer has no duty to fit or instruct on fitting bicycle helmet

Summary Judgment granted for bicycle manufacturer and retailer on a breach of warranty and product liability claim.

For Manufacturers

The legal relationship created between manufactures and US consumers

A recall leads to lawsuits because injuries are connected to the product being recalled thus a lawsuit. Plaintiff’s hope the three can be connected

Combination of a Products Liability statute, an Expert Witness Report that was just not direct enough and odd facts holds a retailer liable as manufacture for product defect.

What do you think? Leave a comment.

If you like this let your friends know or post it on FB, Twitter or LinkedIn

Author: Outdoor Recreation Insurance, Risk Management and Law

To Purchase Go Here:

Copyright 2017 Recreation Law (720) Edit Law

Email: Rec-law@recreation-law.com

Google+: +Recreation

Twitter: RecreationLaw

Facebook: Rec.Law.Now

Facebook Page: Outdoor Recreation & Adventure Travel Law

Blog:
www.recreation-law.com

Mobile Site: http://m.recreation-law.com

By Recreation Law    Rec-law@recreation-law.com    James H. Moss

#AdventureTourism, #AdventureTravelLaw, #AdventureTravelLawyer, #AttorneyatLaw, #Backpacking, #BicyclingLaw, #Camps, #ChallengeCourse, #ChallengeCourseLaw, #ChallengeCourseLawyer, #CyclingLaw, #FitnessLaw, #FitnessLawyer, #Hiking, #HumanPowered, #HumanPoweredRecreation, #IceClimbing, #JamesHMoss, #JimMoss, #Law, #Mountaineering, #Negligence, #OutdoorLaw, #OutdoorRecreationLaw, #OutsideLaw, #OutsideLawyer, #RecLaw, #Rec-Law, #RecLawBlog, #Rec-LawBlog, #RecLawyer, #RecreationalLawyer, #RecreationLaw, #RecreationLawBlog, #RecreationLawcom, #Recreation-Lawcom, #Recreation-Law.com, #RiskManagement, #RockClimbing, #RockClimbingLawyer, #RopesCourse, #RopesCourseLawyer, #SkiAreas, #Skiing, #SkiLaw, #Snowboarding, #SummerCamp, #Tourism, #TravelLaw, #YouthCamps, #ZipLineLawyer, Recall, CPSC, Consumer Product Safety Council, Brompton, Bicycles, Bottom Bracket,



Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays


Wilderness Medical Society Trailblazer: If you work in Outdoor Recreation you should be a Member!

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Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays from the WMS! We would like to thank everyone for joining us in our adventures and at our conferences this year. We are ever grateful for our membership and all those that support this Society. We look forward to 2018 as we are excited to bring our Winter and Summer conferences to two cities for the first time: Lake Tahoe, Nevada and Midway, Utah! Thank you to everyone for helping to make the WMS community what it is and for truly combining your profession with your passion!
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So you’ve been bitten by a leech. What’s the worst that could happen?
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“Several years ago, emergency physician Jeremy Joslin found himself overseeing an ultramarathon in the backcountry of Cambodia. Once they’d finished the event, many of the athletes wanted to cool off and noticed an inviting stream nearby.

‘After a few minutes, the screams started,’ says Joslin, who is based at SUNY Upstate Medical University in Syracuse. It was not long before people began hurrying back to camp-along with the multiple leeches that had become attached to their bodies. The next few days were filled with bandage changes and mild bleeding.

Most leech encounters play out similarly. Finding one of these bloodthirsty worms on your body can be a disturbing experience, but it’s usually not a medical emergency.

Usually. Every once in awhile, leeches can cause some serious and gruesome complications. Here’s what can happen when one of these little suckers bites you, and what you can do about it…”

READ MORE
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For the first time ever, the WMS is heading to Lake Tahoe!
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Wilderness Medicine Conference

February 23 – 28, 2018

Stateline, Nevada

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Join us for this exciting WMS Winter Conference at Harvey’s Lake Tahoe on the South Shore in 2018!

Morning plenary sessions will cover all the essential winter wilderness topics, like avalanche rescue, hypothermia, frostbite and recent advances in altitude illness, and much more. In the afternoons you can choose from indoor and outdoor small group sessions and optional hands-on workshops. Or, you may choose to take some time off to ski, snowboard or explore the exciting Lake Tahoe region. This flexible schedule allows you to have plenty of time for education, recreation and relaxation!

REGISTER
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Announcements
Additional Liability Insurance Coverage Now Available to Members

As of November, members can now apply for additional coverage up to $200,000 (above and beyond the $50,000 for WMS Members)! The rate for this coverage is $800 annually (or $67/month). The coverage period extends from November 1 – October 31, so Members acquiring coverage mid-year will pay a prorated fee. Your WMS membership will be verified each November 1 for renewal eligibiltiy.

Note: Once a Members application is complete, an invoice and BILL will be sent directly to the WMS Member. Payment can be made by check or credit card, but there is a $25 fee for credit cards. Once the payment is processed, the Member will be sent a receipt and a Certificate of Insurance with them named.

Click here for more information and to apply!

WMS Seeking Committee Chair for Operational Medicine Committee

We are currently seeking to fill an open chair position for the Operational Medicine Committee. The mission of the committee is to acquire and function as a conduit for the latest operational medical research and field knowledge from the military. The committee is comprised of dedicated military field personnel interested in sharing techniques learned on the field. The Committee is in need of a person who will take the lead in developing lectures with the assistance of committee members to present at future WMS conferences.

If interested, please contact WMS COO Robyn Bonini.

Accepting Applications for 2018 Research Grants

The Wilderness Medical Society is pleased to announce the CALL FOR RESEARCH ABSTRACTS for the WMS Annual Meeting & Summer Conference, August 3-8, 2018 in Midway, Utah.

* Notifications of accepted abstracts will be sent by May 4, 2018.

* Accepted abstracts will be presented as posters at the meeting, with a selection chosen for oral presentations.

* One oral presentation will be selected for the 2018 WMS Outstanding Research Presentation Award ($500 award).

* All accepted abstracts will be considered for publication in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine.

* Abstract presenters will receive free registration for the day of presentation.

For questions or more information, please contact Alicia Byrne.

Application and more information can be found here.

New Features on Our Website

We are excited to announce a couple new features on our website! As most of you know, the WMS maintains a variety of committees designed to oversee various aspects of the society. Now you have the opportunity to participate in these committees! Each committee now has a blog open to WMS members so you can communicate your thoughts and ideas with us. Check it out at the Committees page of our website!

We are also proud to present online forums in a variety of topics for members to submit their input. These include forums for research questions and information, sharing relevant news stories, articles in our online magazine, Wilderness Medicine Magazine, and many more! You can check it out in the Members Area of our website.

Want to engage with others interested in the WMS? Check out the “Discussions” tab on the home page of WMS.ORG to interact with other visitors to the site!

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UPCOMING EVENTS
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Everest Experience

March 25 – April 14, 2018

Due to on-going demand for “adventure, hands-on” wilderness medicine training and experience, the WMS has put together this world-class program. This course offers the opportunity for continuing medical education while on an Everest base camp (EBC) trek. WMS CME credit is available from Kathmandu to Everest base camp, and we are planning on two nights at EBC (not normally offered for Everest treks) in cooperation with Everest ER.

Register >

Canyon Country Adventure

May 3 – 11, 2018

Discover hidden arches and signs of the ancient Anasazi, explore slot canyons, and climb desert towers on this classic introduction to Southern Utah’s amazing canyon country. While learning important Wilderness Medicine topics, learn basic canyoneering skills. Revel in and truly experience the spectacular beauty of this iconic landscape.

Register >

Mars Desert Research Station

May 12 – 19, 2018
May 19 – 26, 2018

Nothing speaks to the essence of “wilderness” more than another planet. Mars represents the most remote and austere environment that humans have ever contemplated exploring. To simulate the demands of living and working on Mars, The Mars Society has established an analogue Mars base, called the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS), in the Utah desert. In partnership with the Mars Society, the WMS will use MDRS as a base of operations for exploring “Mars.”

Register >

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New in Wilderness Medicine Magazine
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Case Review: Finnish Lightning Storm

In July of 2011, lightning from a storm in Hanko, Finland left eight injured – three critically…

Read More >

Lyme Disease: Part Two

Part Two: Tick Removal and population control…

Read More >

Desert: Let’s Go Out to the Movies

Resident desert expert Edward “Mel” Otten brings us his top 10 desert movies…

Read More >

Copyright © 2017. All Rights Reserved.
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CAIC Benefit Bash raised over $100K, save the date for 2018 December 1, 2018

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DECEMBER 2017 ISSUE |What a Bash!
Decade Deep : A Recap
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The 10th Annual CAIC Benefit Bash raised $118,640.99 for avalanche forecasting and education in Colorado!

What a Bash. This event would not have been possible without the 125 incredibly generous sponsors, 70 hard working volunteers, 6 breweries that donated delicious beer, and the Summit County restaurant community that fed all1,200 of us. We are especially thankful for all of you that joined us and helped us break our fundraising record once again. To view photos from the party, click here for our Facebook photo album. Photos provided by the talented Rebecca Wissman.

SAVE THIS DATE:
Saturday, December 1st, 2018
11th Annual CAIC Benefit Bash
“Up to 11”
Riverwalk Center, Breckenridge

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Friends of CAIC Launch Version 2 of the CAIC Mobile App!

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We are proud to announce that we have launched version 2 of our mobile app for both Android and Apple devices. We could not have done this without our partnership with The North Face.The mobile app project aligns directly with our effort to make the avalanche forecasts easily accessible across a variety of platforms. Version 2 of the mobile app optimizes the daily zone avalanche forecasts for all 10 zones across Colorado. Our focus for version 2 was an updated user interface that provided a cleaner path to the avalanche forecast, danger ratings, and zone weather tables.

Our partnership with The North Face merges technology with a common goal to provide avalanche information to our incredible community of backcountry users. We are excited to continually update the app to provide additional resources and tools.

Download the latest version here:
Android
Apple

2017 Annual Report
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Over the past year the Friends of CAIC and CAIC have made great strides in building the best avalanche center possible.

Your donations continue to drive and improve our programs for backcountry forecasting and education throughout Colorado. You can see more in our FY2017 Annual Report by clicking here.

Want to give back?
Whether you use the CAIC forecasts every day or once a year, please consider making a year-end donation to support avalanche forecasting and education in Colorado. A donation of even $25 helps us continue to improve our programs. Please donate today and support your avalanche center.
Donate Now
Upcoming Events
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Backcountry Brains

Sunday, January 7
Grab your smartest friends and join Friends of CAIC and Breckenridge Distillery for an apres snow trivia party! Learn more by clicking here.

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Monarch Backcountry Day

Saturday, January 13
Mark your calendars for what will be a fun backcountry awareness and demo day at Monarch! More information coming soon.

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BV Backcountry Day

Saturday, January 21
The Trailhead, Buena Vista
Demos of ALL KINDS: Skis, splitboards, cross-country, snowshoes, fat bikes…plus a killer after-party. All proceeds benefit the CAIC. Learn more by clicking here.

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16th Annual Beacon Bowl

Saturday, February 3
Arapahoe Basin Ski Area
It’s back! Beacon search competitions, avy search dogs, apres party – what more can you ask for? Learn more by clicking here.

Featured Follower
Tag us for a chance to be featured!
@friendsofcaic | #friendsofcaic
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“Epic weekend in the mountains with Backcountry Babes and some new adventure-loving friends for my AIARE 1. We learned about avalanche safety, following our intuition, companion rescue, the mechanics of snowpack, and so much more! Can’t wait to continue learning and practicing these skills in the mountains this winter!”
– Kim Allen, @kimexplorescolorado

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