I was honored by Outdoor Retailer Celebrating 35 years of the Community that Show has Created

I was honored by @OutdoorRetailer in their publication Celebrating  Thirty-Five Years of the People and Passions that Turned an Industry into a Community.

My fellow community members included such luminaries as Peter Kray, Larry Harrison, Yvon Chouinard, Steve Barker, Carson Stanwood, Chad Gallwitz, Sally McCoy, Casey Sheahan, Chris Goddard, Bill Gamber, Peter Metcalf, Conrad Anker, Jen Taylor, James Edward Mills, my good friend Marcus Woolf, and many others. I was truly honored to be included in such a community of people, industry heavy hitters and just plain famous people.

There may not be any real reason to go to the semi annual show you might think, but the feeling of not going, of missing those friends you only see once or twice a year will always bring you back to the show. Where else are you going to get started, get that first interest from a retailer or the media about your idea. Most importantly where else are you going to become part of the outdoor industry.

I remember in 1999 after the tornado had turned the show tents into a field of liter, I worried about what was going to happen to the show. I had worked on several people in the aftermath, including the man who died. I was worried the show would not go on, and I would leave Salt Lake and have no support for my feelings or issues.

I was able to talk to Dr. Eric Weiss, of Adventure Medical Kits who assured me that I had done everything I could to save the people I worked on. I was interviewed by Fred Knapp (Sharp End Publishing) for an article about the tornado, and he asked me one question. I just started talking until I was worn out. It was Outdoor Retailer therapy in a booth. Both would have been difficult if not impossible at home and nowhere could I be in a group of people that understood. I felt safe at a trade show; such a crazy statement. Yet no other industry would even come close to being able to support that statement or feeling of safety. Yet it is the basis for the success of Outdoor Retailer. Because the outdoor industry is a community.

From the thumping of the people, waiting to get on the show floor before the doors opened in Reno and the founding and growth of ORCA (now OIA) to the trying to find a cab and a drink in the first couple of years in Salt Lake, the show has continuously provided an environment to meet, learn, greet and love the people in the outdoor industry community.

It might be the lack of suits. It might be because most of the items on the show floor are for fun. It might be walking the aisles is an Easter egg hunt, looking for that next great idea or invention. It might be because you can have a beer with your friends. I think the biggest reason for the community is smiles. You walk down the aisles of the show floor and you see smiles. Big grins as old friends or just semi annual friends are seeing each other again.

Now it is moving to Denver; If I miss a show, it will only because I’m being recycled in a corn field.

Thank Doug Schnitzspahn (the hardest working man in outdoor media) for finding me on the show floor. Thank you Emerald Expositions and Outdoor Retailer for your help, support and smiles.


USA ProChallenge Host Cities for 2015 Announced. Different cities, Going to be a slightly Different Race. Cool!

Host Cities Announced for 2015 USA Pro Challenge

Fans Can Help Shape the Route for America’s Most Difficult Professional Cycling Race

Colorado’s largest sporting event is back for 2015, and today race officials unveiled seven of the host cities that will be highlighted as starts and finishes for the 2015 USA Pro Challenge. Taking place Aug. 17-23, the race will feature several dramatic changes for 2015, including a new overall start in beautiful Steamboat Springs, new host communities Arapahoe Basin and Copper Mountain and a challenging individual time trial course in in the scenic town of Breckenridge. And with six of the seven stages set, organizers are looking to fans to help determine the location of Stage 6.

“The start and finish cities for the 2015 USA Pro Challenge are going to create some unique challenges for the riders while also showcasing some of Colorado’s most beautiful regions to our worldwide audience,” said Rick Schaden, owner of the USA Pro Challenge. “We are always humbled by the amount of interest we receive from cities across the state that want to host the race and we feel confident that the partners we’ve selected this year will help us continue to raise the bar for professional cycling in America.”

After drawing more than 1 million fans each year and generating $130 million in economic impact to the State of Colorado in 2014 alone, the USA Pro Challenge will make its return with an overall start in Steamboat Springs. Over the course of seven days of intensely competitive racing, the world’s best riders will return to iconic Colorado cities that have been key parts of the race in previous years, such as Aspen and Denver.

In a mix of new and prior host cities, the stages of the 2015 USA Pro Challenge include:

  • Stage 1: Monday, Aug. 17 – Steamboat Springs Circuit Race
  • Stage 2: Tuesday, Aug. 18 – Steamboat Springs to Arapahoe Basin
  • Stage 3: Wednesday, Aug. 19 – Copper Mountain Resort to Aspen
  • Stage 4: Thursday, Aug. 20 – Aspen to Breckenridge
  • Stage 5: Friday, Aug. 21 – Breckenridge Individual Time Trial
  • Stage 6: Saturday, Aug. 22 – ???
  • Stage 7: Sunday, Aug. 23 – Golden to Denver

Last year, fans weighed in on the final stage and ultimately determined a route that took the riders from Boulder, through Golden and finished in Downtown Denver. Due to overwhelming fan interest and support, organizers are again letting people have a say in the course. Fans will be able to help shape the race by logging on to www.prochallenge.com/2015stage6 before 11:59 p.m. MT December 12, and giving their opinion on what part of the state Stage 6 should visit.

“Last year we turned to our dedicated fans to help determine the route for the final stage of the Pro Challenge,” said Shawn Hunter, CEO of the USA Pro Challenge. “The enthusiasm and valuable opinions that we received convinced us that we should look to our supporters again for their input on the 2015 race. We know our fans are passionate about the sport and we’re looking forward to hearing where they want Stage 6 to go.”

A new overall start for the Pro Challenge, Steamboat Springs, with a population of just more than 12,000, should see that number at least double on race day. Located just west of the Continental Divide and Rabbit Ears Pass, Steamboat is the perfect location to kick off the race and showcase Colorado’s unique scenic beauty. And as the Colorado city that has produced more Olympians than any other, the riders should feel right at home.

In one of the most significant changes to the 2015 route, Breckenridge will host the individual time trial. Located 9,600 ft. above sea level, this course will test the riders with challenging, hilly terrain. With these additions combined with new host cities Arapahoe Basin and Copper Mountain Resort, the 2015 course will create dramatic moments for the riders and fans.

Known for lung-searing altitudes and intense climbs through the Colorado Rockies, the race is the largest spectator event in the history of the state. The 2014 USA Pro Challenge saw part-time Aspen resident Tejay van Garderen of BMC Racing Team take the overall win for the second year in a row this past August in Denver.

“I am so happy to hear the USA Pro Challenge is going through Aspen again,” said van Garderen. “It is always great to be able to race in front of my family and close friends. Of course, I am curious to see the route they will pick and I am expecting it to be the most challenging route yet.”

Additional details regarding the exact start and finish locations of the 2015 race, as well as the specific, detailed route will be announced in the spring.


Be a Changemaker in the Environmental Ed Movement- CAEE Friend Fundraiser-Wynkoop Brewery

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Join the Colorado Alliance for Environmental Education

for the annual

EE Changemaker Friend and Fundraiser

Wednesday, November 5, 2014

5:00-7:30p.m.

VIP Reception 4:00-5:00p.m.

Wynkoop Brewery, Denver

~Help build the movement toward 100% environmentally literacy in Colorado~

Come for a bE.E.r and brew a movement for sustainability. Participate in a live auction to win weekend getaways, recreation equipment, and super food.

Tickets

$25/person Spark: Come for Happy Hour and brew a movement for Sustainability.
$50/person Catalyst: Includes Happy Hour, Specialized “EE” Beer, and Green Brewery Tour
$75/person Changemaker: Includes Happy Hour, Specialized “EE” Beer, and VIP Reception with Special Guest
Start the movement. Register to attend today.
152.pngCan’t Attend?Build the movement with a donation today.
Event Preview

4:00-5:00Private VIP Receptionwith Special Guest 5:00Changemaker Friend and Fundraiser 6:45 Wynkoop GreenBrewery Tour
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We welcome you to invite friends and colleagues who share our passion for environmental education to this inspiring event!

CAEE: Catalyzing the Collective Power of Environmental Educators576996752_731eddfdbb.jpgMahatma Gandhi once said, “We must be the change we wish to see in the world.” Every day, environmental educators embody this philosophy. Classroom teachers, natural resource professionals, business role models, government agencies and others are ensuring that Coloradans have the knowledge and skills to make informed decisions about the environment. CAEE is catalyzing the collective power of environmental educators. Will you join us to build an environmental literacy movement that supports healthy environments and thriving communities throughout Colorado?
Other CAEE AnnouncementDue Monday, October 27, 2014-Submit a Session Proposal*2015 Advancing Environmental Education ConferenceExplore Research, Elevate Practice, Spark Collaborations

Friday, March 27-Saturday, March 28, 2015- Auraria Campus-Denver

Help explore, elevate and spark environmental education by presenting at CAEE’s 15th annual Colorado’s Advancing Environmental Education Conference

(also known as Teaching Outside the Box).

CAEE is seeking session proposals that highlight environmental education (EE) approaches and capacity building from a variety of backgrounds, sectors and focus areas, and in particular the connections between EE research, practices and collaborations that offer tangible takeaways for participants.

Click here for more information about submitting a session proposal

*We prefer sessions to be submitted by October 27, however, if you need a little more time, please email info for an extension.

CAEE Logo Simple BWCOLORADO ALLIANCE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION152060 South Golden RoadGolden, Colorado 80401

303-273-9527

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2014 VeloSwap: Into Cycling you need to be there if you Need a deal or got deals to sell

MEDIA ADVISORY

Wheelin’ and Dealin’ at Cyclists’ Ultimate Bargain Hunt

· Subaru VeloSwap Denver returns to National Western Complex Sat., Oct 18

· 10,000 expected to buy, sell and swap bikes, gear, parts and accessories

· Find the best deals of the year as bike shops and more clear out inventory!

What: Inspired by the excitement of the USA Pro Cycling Challenge? Dreaming of a new set of wheels? Get ready to ride at the Subaru VeloSwap Denver, the ultimate bargain treasure hunt for cycling enthusiasts. A true celebration of all things cycling, the event features the opportunity to buy, sell and recycle new and used bicycles and equipment. Find the rarest parts and the best deals, while recycling your old gear! Veloswap.com
When: Saturday, October 18, 20149:00am – 4:00pm
Where: National Western Complex4655 Humboldt St.
Denver, CO 80216
Who: · Almost 10,000 people are expected to attend· 300+ exhibitors will have the best deals cyclists will see all year

· Thousands start lining up outside as early as 6:00am to get the best deals

Tickets:
More:
  • Subaru VeloSwap Denver supports a number of cycling non-profits, including Bike Denver, Bicycle Colorado, and Bicycle Aurora, who work to keep bicycling safe and accessible to the community. The Subaru VeloSwap also gives back to the community by providing a forum to find and return stolen bikes.
  • Subaru VeloSwap focuses on being green, by helping cyclists reuse and recycle. An expanded Eco-Village will house many new companies and the Subaru Roving Recycler will help keep the event clean and green.

· New!! – New Product Showcase; check out the new 2015 equipment and talk with company reps about the latest and greatest in the industry including Bianchi, Parlee, Focus, Pedego E-Bikes and more.

· Participants are invited to attend unique and informative seminars from Natural Grocers and others and enter to win amazing raffle prizes.

· The day will conclude with live music in the supplier area.

Green Guru will be there taking your old tubes and recycling them into new products.

Interested in great design and high tech….in a tent. Check this out from a friend and 20 year tent designer

Check out our latest mad project on Kickstarter now until September 15th:
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/tentlab/ultimate-3-and-4-person-tents-directly-from-the-de

Mike Cecot-Scherer

theTentLab.com

Inkling Incorporated

office & mobile: 303.413.9535

796 West Birch Court, Louisville, Colorado, 80027

Two wrongs don’t make a right—but three lefts do.


USA Pro Challenge Starts Monday

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Are you ready to race in Colorado?

The USA Pro Challenge starts Monday in Aspen.

Find the route near you and go see the race!

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Want to Volunteer for the USA Pro Challenge, sign up Now!

Every stage is a story - Aspen, Crested Butte - Gunnison - Monarch Mountain - Colorado Springs - Woodland Park - Breckenridge - Vail - Boulder - Denver

USA Pro Challenge Volunteer Opportunities – Sign-Up Now!

The USA Pro Challenge is seeking volunteers for the professional cycling race, which will travel through some of Colorado’s most scenic regions August 18-24. Cycling fans and enthusiasts are encouraged to participate in this momentous event by signing up for volunteer positions along the 550-mile course in Aspen, Snowmass, Crested Butte, Gunnison, Monarch Mountain, Colorado Springs, Woodland Park, Breckenridge, Vail, Boulder and Denver.Volunteers looking for an opportunity to participate in the race can apply online for positions at http://www.prochallenge.com/volunteer-signup. The majority of volunteers are needed to serve as course marshals, providing support to professional course marshals that travel with the Tour and the local law enforcement authorities in each host city. Volunteers selected as course marshals will have the unique opportunity to be present on the race route, in a close proximity to the cyclists, and are tasked with monitoring pedestrian traffic, street closures and barricades.READ MORE
Volunteer for the USA Pro Challenge
2014 host cities
Merch of the Month
See the 2014 Host Cities
Sign-up today for the Inaugural Aspen Gran Fondo on June 14th!
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Aspen Silver Cycling, in partnership with the USA Pro Challenge is set to stage the inaugural ASPEN GRAN FONDO June 14th in Aspen & Snowmass Colorado. This mass participation ride is open to all riders at all skill levels and will showcase a 50 mile route with portions of ride along the same route the pros will ride in the upcoming Stage One & Two of the 2014 USA Pro Challenge-August 18th & 19th.Don’t delay- register today! Reserve your spot for this unique cycling experience.Visit www.granfondoaspen.com for more details
Pro Challenge Experience Presented by UnitedHealthcare – August 10th!
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We’ve added a new element to the Pro Challenge Experience presented by UnitedHealthcare this year! Compete in the new Champions Challenge, where three teams of 30 will race to finish the 50 mile course first- captained by a National Champion. Who will you side with? Timmy Duggan (Team Red), Chris Baldwin (Team White) or Alison Dunlap (Team Blue)?The aggregate scores of the top ten riders in each team will determine the winning team. The fastest overall individual will receive two passes to the VIP Hospitality Tent at the Stage 7 Denver finish.Spots are limited, so register today!

For more information, visit:
www.usaprocyclingchallenge.com/pro-challenge-experience

Peter Sagan: Last Year’s Top Cyclist Looks to Second Half of the Season Success
Monarch & Salida
Throughout 2013, the man known as “The Terminator”, did all he could to exact Judgment Day on the rest of the professional peloton last year, notching 27 wins and winning the Sprint Points jersey in five stage races, landing him as the world’s second-ranked rider at the end of the season.READ MORE
Host City Highlight: Colorado Springs
Colorado Springs
Often referred to as the “Amateur Sports Capital of the U.S.”, Colorado Springs is home to the U.S. Olympic Committee, the Olympic Training Center and 56 sports organizations including 22 National Governing Bodies of Sports (USA Cycling, USA Triathlon, USA Hockey, etc.).READ MORE
LOOK FOR THE YELLOW: MAVIC BACK AS NEUTRAL TECH SERVICES
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Known for their yellow cars that roll behind the professional peloton racing the 700-plus miles of roads of the USA Pro Challenge, MAVIC is back providing neutral technical services.READ MORE
Nissan UnitedHealthcare Colorado Smashburger
Sierra Nevada CSU Centura Health 1stBank
CO National Guard Coke Team Novo Nordisk Jelly Belly
Pearl Optum 9news Denver Post

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Colorado Outdoor Recreation Resource Partnership meeting Friday: Confluence of Oil & Gas Development and Recreation

Denver Capital building

Denver Capital building (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Don’t miss this! Please join CORRP on Friday, June 20th for a

discussion about the confluence of oil and gas development and recreation.

Location: Colorado Parks & Wildlife, Hunter Education building, 6060 Broadway, Denver, CO 80216 http://goo.gl/maps/sebC3
Date: Friday, June 20th, from 8:00 to 9AM (doors open at 7:30AM)

CORRP is the Colorado Outdoor Recreation Resource Partnership. CORRP communicates the public value and resulting management needs of Colorado’s diverse outdoor recreation resources in such a way that their intrinsic and economic values are maintained for future generations.

Outdoor Alliance Colorado (OAC) will be providing refreshments. OAC is a state wide human-powered recreation partnership that serves as a platform for members to coordinate their efforts to protect public lands, waters and snowscapes, and to ensure these places can be experienced in a meaningful and sustainable manner. Learn more at: outdooralliance.net/colorado/

Speakers from Outdoor Alliance Colorado include Nathan Fey, American Whitewater’s Colorado Stewardship Director and Leslie Kehmeier IMBA’s Mapping Specialist. They will be sharing their work on a statewide map of the intersection of recreation and oil and gas development.

Jason Robertson, CORRP co-chair and Forest Service Rocky Mountain Region Deputy Director for Recreation, Lands & Minerals will also be sharing agency observations on the relationship between recent developments in the oil and gas industry and land management for recreation.

Don Bruns, Bureau of Land Management Colorado Recreation Program Lead, will present on recent work related to the Visual Resource Management of development as it relates to recreation, with an emphasis on mitigating those impacts.

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Colorado Scenic and Historic Byways 25th Anniversary Conference on June 19 & 20, 2014, along the Peak to Peak Scenic Byway, at the Ameristar Convention Center in Black Hawk, Colorado.

More information: Colorado Scenic and Historic Byways 25th Anniversary — CDOT

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Colorado Scenic and Historic Byways 25th Anniversary …

25th Anniversary Conference June 19 & 20, 2014 Black Hawk, Colorado Conference Registration & Sponsorship Conference Agenda

View on www.coloradodot.info

Preview by Yahoo

Byways.Elevated.

June 19 – 20th

Colorado’s Byways 25th Anniversary

AGENDA

THURSDAY – June 19

3:00 – 4:30 Conference Registration, Reception, & Check-In Entertainment by Bear Limvere

5:00 – 6:00 Keynote Speaker -Joe Calhoon, Author of

The One Hour Plan for Growth

6:00 – 7:30 Welcome & Awards Dinner FRIDAY – June 20

7:00 – 8:30

9:00 – 9:45

Breakfast & Opening Remarks, Special Awards Navigating the Road to Private Funding ­

Jeffery Pryor, Ed.D., CEO of Pathfinder Solutions

1st Breakout Sessions

• Keeping Your Byway Relevant and Moving into the Future Panel – Scott Brutjen, Bob Marshall & Kelli Hepler

• Keeping the Scenery in Scenic Byways

Don Bruns & Karla Rogers

• The Benefits of Colorado Byways – Shelby Sommer & Matt Goebel

2nd Breakout Sessions

• Shaping Your Board into Byway Leaders – Janine Vanderburg

• Driving Your Byway Message Straight to the Traveler ­

Kelly Barbello

• #Savvy Social Media Panel – Bobby Weidmann, Angus Shee

& Allison Bejarano

Luncheon with Guest Presentation – Hokkaido, Japan Byways

Colorado Meadows

Colorado Meadows (Photo credit: QualityFrog)

3rd Breakout Sessions

• Latest Trends in Keeping Our Historic Buildings – Patrick Ideman

• Byways and Your Belly! – Judy Walden

• Securing Colorado Byways: ‘GIS Project’ – Charlotte Bumgarner

& Yvonne Barnes

4th Breakout Sessions

• Gaining Legislative Support for Colorado Byways – Roger Wilson

• Engaging the Youth in Byways – Michelle Pearson

• Healthy Highways – Judy Walden & Gaylene Ore

ColoradoGives.org –Dana Rinderknecht, Community First Foundation

The former gold mining camp of Black Hawk, Col...

The former gold mining camp of Black Hawk, Colorado (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Closing Remarks

Lenore Bates, Program Manager

Colorado Scenic and Historic Byways

CDOT | 4201 E Arkansas Ave, Shumate Bldg | Denver CO 80222

P 303.757.9786 | F 303.757.9727

Lenore.Batess | www .coloradobyways.org

Colorado Byways connect tourists, preservationists and local communities.

Agenda052914.pdf

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National Get Outdoors Day Denver needs a few more Volunteers.

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We Need a Few More Great People!

National Get Outdoors Day

is Saturday, June 14th

We are looking for volunteers!

If you or anyone in your agency would be interested in joining us for a day of fun outdoor activities, please register now!

We need more help with the

GO Play! 5K and Fun Run!

Please contact Melissa Branson with questions.

Thank you!

CPRA & Get Outdoors Colorado

Colorado Parks & Recreation AssociationPOB 1037Wheat Ridge, Colorado 80034

303-231-0943

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EPA Region 8 is launching an Earth Day poster contest in conjunction with the 2014 EPA Earth Day theme of climate change, and with the EPA Climate Change in Focus Video Contest.

Theme of the Poster Contest:  What are the impacts of climate changes in my area?  The Earth’s climate is getting warmer. Rain patterns are changing, sea level is rising, and snow and ice are melting sooner in the spring. As global temperatures continue to rise, we are likely to see more changes in our climate and our local environment. These changes have the potential to affect people, animals, and ecosystems in many ways.  To enter the poster contest, represent the climate change impacts in your area on a poster using the art medium of your choice (drawing, painting, photograph, fiber, mixed media, etc.).

All posters will be displayed, and the winners will be announced, at an event on Monday, April 28, from 12:00 to 1:00 pm at the EPA Region 8 Regional Office in Denver, CO.  

Theme of the Poster Contest:  What are the impacts of climate changes in my area?  The Earth’s climate is getting warmer. Rain patterns are changing, sea level is rising, and snow and ice are melting sooner in the spring. As global temperatures continue to rise, we are likely to see more changes in our climate and our local environment. These changes have the potential to affect people, animals, and ecosystems in many ways.  To enter the poster contest, represent the climate change impacts in your area on a poster using the art medium of your choice (drawing, painting, photograph, fiber, mixed media, etc.). 

Contest Guidelines:

               only one entry per student (K-12)

               entries must not be more than 18×24 inches

               include your name, email address, phone number and street address on the back of each entry (school contact information for students only)

               elementary, middle, and high school student are eligible to participate

               posters can be in color or black and white, and use any type of art medium (paint, pencil, photos, fiber, … etc.)

               1st-3rd place winners in each track will receive a certificate, and students will have the opportunity to visit the EPA Regional Office in Denver, CO

               all winners will have their artwork displayed in the EPA Region 8 Conference Center

               all entries are due April 15th, winners will be announced on Earth Day

               an event will be held in the EPA Region 8 conference center to view all the posters and celebrate the winners – Monday, April 28, from 12:00 to 1:00pm

Mail your entries to:

Wendy Dew

Outreach and Education Coordinator

MC OC

1595 Wynkoop Street

Denver, CO 80470

Teacher Reference Materials:

http://www.epa.gov/climatechange/kids/

http://www.epa.gov/climatechange/kids/contest.html

http://www.epa.gov/students/teachers.html

http://www.epa.gov/climatechange/

For More Information Contact:

Wendy Dew

Outreach and Education Coordinator

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Region 8 ( CO, ND, SD, MT, UT, WY )

1595 Wynkoop Street, 8OC

Denver CO 80202-1129

dew.wendy@epa.gov

303-312-6605303-312-6605 office

Or

Laura Farris

Climate Change Coordinator

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Region 8 ( CO, ND, SD, MT, UT, WY )

1595 Wynkoop Street, 8OC

Denver CO 80202-1129

farris.laura@epa.gov

303-312-6741303-312-6741 office

What do you think? Leave a comment.

If you like this let your friends know or post it on FB, Twitter or LinkedIn

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Email: Rec-law@recreation-law.com

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Facebook: Rec.Law.Now

Facebook Page: Outdoor Recreation & Adventure Travel Law

Blog:www.recreation-law.com

Mobile Site: http://m.recreation-law.com

By Recreation Law       Rec-law@recreation-law.com         James H. Moss    #Authorrank

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Denver B-Cycle is hiring!

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We’re Hiring! We are looking to fill three to four part-time bicycle technician positions this spring. This is a great opportunity for anyone who enjoys bikes, working outside, learning, and being a part of a mostly bearded team. We would appreciate you sending this link on to anyone that might be interested. Click here for more information.

What’s On This Week?

Valentine’s Special: Drink Like a Couple, MCA Denver INFORMATION

February 14th 5:00 – 9:00 pm

Head to the MCA Denver for great art and 2 for 1 drink specials

B-cycle station – 15th & Delgany

Maya: Hidden Worlds Revealed, City Park INFORMATION

February 14th – August 24th

See this long-anticipated exhibit on its opening weekend

B-cycle station – Denver Museum of Nature & Science

Southwest Rink at Skyline Park, Skyline Park INFORMATION

November 26th – February 16th

Enjoy the nice weekend weather while skating during the final weekend

B-cycle station – 17th & Curtis

Denver Botanic Gardens Free Day, Cheesman Park INFORMATION

February 17th

Finish the long weekend with a free visit to the Botanic Gardens

B-cycle station – Denver Botanic Gardens

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2014 Exhibitor Registration for National Get Outdoors Day Denver or Your City I suspect

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GOC

REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN!

Register to be an Exhibitor at National Get Outdoors Day

Denver City Park – June 14, 2014

9am – 4pm

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Planning for the 7th Annual National Get Outdoors Day

is underway!

We are committed to providing an amazing day of free outdoor experiences and discovery at Denver City Park for all of our visitors. We hope you and your organization will join us again.

REGISTER NOW

NATIONAL GET OUTDOORS DAY 2014 EXHIBITOR PLANNING CALENDAR

April 23rd, 2pm

All Partners Meeting

Location TBD

_________

May 12th

Exhibitor Registration Deadline

_______

Friday, June 13th

MANDATORY Exhibitor Walk-Thru

Denver City Park –

Playground East of Ferril Lake, 11 a.m.

We hope to again host a partners BBQ after the walk-thru.

Set-up for the event will begin at 1pm.

Security will be on-site overnight

_______

Saturday, June 14th

National Get Outdoors Day

Denver City Park

6am – Exhibitor Gates Open

9am-4pm – Event

9am – GO Play 5K Starts

After Visitors Are Cleared – Exhibitor Gates Open for Clean-up


Job Opening! Regional Director: Southern Front Range

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Regional Director: Southern Front Range

 

Summary:  The Southern Front Range Site Director is a senior management position that contributes to the leadership of the agency and provides oversight of programs in Colorado Springs and the 7-county Southern Front Range region.  The Southern Front Range Site has doubled in size in the last several years and stands poised for even more growth in an area recently impacted by wildfire and floods.  The site has impressive program outcomes and high levels of satisfaction from community partners and youth participants.  This is a multifaceted position calling for person with a wide range of experience, comfortable in a leadership role with a great deal of autonomy. This position is based in the Colorado Springs office and reports to the Chief Executive Officer located in Denver.

 

Essential Functions:

Supervision and Staff Development

·         Support and lead all staff towards agency mission and goals; consistently contributing to the team effort.

·         Oversee the recruitment and manage the hiring of all Colorado Springs staff and Corpsmembers.

·         Supervise, monitor and evaluate the work performance of all Colorado Springs staff.

·         Implement a standardized orientation and training for Crew Leaders and Corpsmembers.

·         Provide direct support to Crew Leaders in addressing Corpsmember job performance issues.

·         Collaborate with education staff to implement the Six Core Education Areas for Corpsmembers.

 

Program Management

·         Manage/monitor program evaluation striving for continuous quality improvement.

·         Ensure that programs are compliant with grant policies and regulations and are on target to meet the stated objectives.

·         Coordinate reporting for program-related funding. Ensure the consistent, accurate and timely tracking of grant and agency related outcomes.

·         Assist other staff by providing programmatic information needed for marketing materials and fundraising proposals.

·         Ensure worksite safety and current risk management procedures.

·         Assist in planning and organizing recognition events and awards ceremonies.

·         Promote a solution-focused youth development environment in which Corpsmembers and staff have the opportunity to develop new skills and experience personal growth.

 

Project Development & Coordination

·         Work with Project Coordinators to develop fee-for-service (FFS) contracts that provide positive work experiences for Corpsmembers and generate unrestricted income for the agency. 

·         Assist Project Coordinators to prepare the work schedule and launch the peak season programs.

·         Assist Project Coordinators to manage sponsor relations and communication.

 

Agency Leadership

·         Serve as a liaison with community agencies, educational institutions and employers when appropriate.

·         Implement fundraising events related to the SFR region with participation from the SFR Advisory Board.

·         Prepare and submit funding proposals for the SFR region with assistance from the grant writing staff.

·         Build relationships across departments and locations and collaborate effectively internally to promote efficiencies and esprit de corps.

 

Qualifications:

Education

·         Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university required.  Significant nonprofit experience, professional experience in a youth conservation corps or youth development organization, and familiarity with conservation programs and practices encouraged.   Knowledge of Southern Front Range region preferred.

 

Knowledge, Skills & Abilities

·         Superior presentation ability and interpersonal skills, including excellent written and oral communication skills.

·         Ability to read, analyze, and interpret financial reports and documents as well as prepare budgets.

·         Ability to manage complex federal grant hiring and reporting requirements.

·         Proficient with word processing software and presentation software; familiar with Excel, and database software; comfortable with the use of social media.

·         Skills in human resources, personnel and job development functions.

·         Conflict resolution and team building skills.

·         Ability to pass pre-employment background screening and drug testing. 

·         Must have valid driver’s license with a good (insurable) driving record and the ability to drive a 12-passenger van.

·         Ability to drive to Denver office and throughout 7-county southern Front Range region as needed.

 

Hours & Compensation

This is a full-time regular, exempt position with benefits. Salary range is $45,000 – $57,000.  Some evenings and weekend hours may be required for Corps related functions. Some travel to Denver and throughout the 7-county region will be required.

 

How to Apply

Please send resume and cover letter to:

Email: staffjobs@mhyc.net  (include “Regional Director” in the subject line)

Mail:  Mile High Youth Corps Attn: Human Resources, 417 Vermijo, Colorado Springs, CO 80903

Deadline for application: March 3rd, 2014, 5 p.m.

 

 

 

MHYC is an Equal Opportunity Employer

 

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River Management Law Conference Kicks off Week of Education, Training and Networking

RMS 4-C logoLegislative and Environmental Experts will Offer Management Tools and Blueprints

The River Management Society (RMS) announces its biennial education and training symposium, Managing Rivers in Changing Climes: Training Tomorrow’s River Professionals April 15-18, 2014 and its first time partnership with CLE International, producer of River Management Law an education conference April 14th. They will take place at the Renaissance Denver Hotel, Denver, Colorado.

Legal experts at the stand-alone Management Law Conference April 14th, led by Program Chair Lori Potter (Kaplan, Kirsch & Rockwell) will address important river protection issues and the types of river use that frame the challenges and opportunities facing communities throughout the West.  “We are excited to partner with CLE for extensive training experience,” notes River Management Society Executive Director Risa Shimoda.  “The future of our rivers will be prescribed by actions of those who own, use and manage them and RMS appreciates the opportunity to dig into the complexity of river management via this esteemed team of presenters.”

”To complement the CLE conference RMS’ Legal and Legislative track will review legislative and administrative water protection

Wild and Scenic Red River in Kentucky's Clifty...

Wild and Scenic Red River in Kentucky’s Clifty Wilderness, within the Red River Gorge. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

tools by representatives of federal, state and environmental organizations,” continues Shimoda. “Veterans of river-related legal matters will discuss issues related to water rights, appropriation and conservation.” 

RMS will offer the first public workshop on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Form 80, and a ‘FERC 101’ overview of the hydropower licensing process.  Registrants can learn how to write National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) assessments and comment on Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) more effectively, and conduct Wild and Scenic Rivers Section 7 determinations. They will hear about successes and plans for sustainability from emerging watershed partnership groups, and about flood prevention, mitigation and recovery from municipal leaders such as keynote Mayor Karl Dean from Nashville, TN.   Representatives from private, state and federal organizations will offer tips regarding how to find funding for river projects. 

For details on the CLE Conference, visit http://www.cle.com.  To view CLE conference information as well as the Legal and Legislative and other tracks Managing Rivers in Changing Climes: Training Tomorrow’s River Professionals visit http://www.river-management.org.

The River Management Society (RMS) is a national non-profit 501 (c) 3 organization dedicated to supporting professionals who study, manage and protect North America’s Rivers. RMS maintains the only comprehensive resource for packing human waste out from rivers; a growing library of ‘handy’ hydropower license summaries; Prepare to Launch! Guidelines for Designing and Building Launches for Carry-in Watercraft and a Career Center featuring a live feed of river-related professional opportunities.

For more information, contact Risa Shimoda, +1 301 502 6548, rms@river-management.org.

What do you think? Leave a comment.

If you like this let your friends know or post it on FB, Twitter or LinkedIn

Copyright 2014 Recreation Law (720) Edit Law

Email: Rec-law@recreation-law.com

Google+: +Recreation

Twitter: RecreationLaw

Facebook: Rec.Law.Now

Facebook Page: Outdoor Recreation & Adventure Travel Law

Blog:www.recreation-law.com

Mobile Site: http://m.recreation-law.com

By Recreation Law    Rec-law@recreation-law.com      James H. Moss         #Authorrank

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#RecreationLaw, #Recreation-Law.com, #OutdoorLaw, #OutdoorRecreationLaw, #AdventureTravelLaw, #law, #TravelLaw, #JimMoss, #JamesHMoss, #Tourism, #AdventureTourism, #Rec-Law, #RiskManagement, #CyclingLaw, #BicyclingLaw, #FitnessLaw, #Recreation-Law.com, #Backpacking, #Hiking, #Mountaineering, #IceClimbing, #RockClimbing, #RopesCourse, #ChallengeCourse, #SummerCamp, #Camps, #YouthCamps, #Skiing, #Ski Areas, #Negligence, #Snowboarding, #RecreationLaw, #@RecreationLaw, #Cycling.Law, #SkiLaw, #Outside.Law, #Recreation.Law, #RecreationLaw.com, #OutdoorLaw, #RecreationLaw, #OutdoorRecreationLaw, #AdventureTravelLaw, #Law, #TravelLaw, #JimMoss, #JamesHMoss, #AttorneyatLaw, #Tourism, #AdventureTourism, #RecLaw, #RecLawBlog, #RecreationLawBlog, #RiskManagement, #HumanPowered, #HumanPoweredRecreation,# CyclingLaw, #BicyclingLaw, #FitnessLaw, #RecreationLaw.com, #Backpacking, #Hiking, #Mountaineering, #IceClimbing, #RockClimbing, #RopesCourse, #ChallengeCourse, #SummerCamp, #Camps, #YouthCamps, #Skiing, #Ski Areas, #Negligence, #Snowboarding, sport and recreation laws, ski law, cycling law, Colorado law, law for recreation and sport managers, bicycling and the law, cycling and the law, ski helmet law, skiers code, skiing accidents, Recreation Lawyer, Ski Lawyer, Paddlesports Lawyer, Cycling Lawyer, Recreational Lawyer, Fitness Lawyer, Rec Lawyer, Challenge Course Lawyer, Ropes Course Lawyer, Zip Line Lawyer, Rock Climbing Lawyer, Adventure Travel Lawyer, Outside Lawyer, Recreation Lawyer, Ski Lawyer, Paddlesports Lawyer, Cycling Lawyer, #RecreationalLawyer, #FitnessLawyer, #RecLawyer, #ChallengeCourseLawyer, #RopesCourseLawyer, #ZipLineLawyer, #RockClimbingLawyer, #AdventureTravelLawyer, #OutsideLawyer, Good Samaritan, Samaritan, First Aid, The River Management Society, RMS, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, Managing Rivers in Changing Climes: Training Tomorrow’s River Professionals, National Environmental Policy Act, Risa Shimoda,

 

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Wow, very amazing and generous. Primal (Denver Bicycle Clothing Company Gave Back More Than One Million Dollars in 2013

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A big believer in giving back to cycling and charitable organizations, Primal Wear donated more the one million dollars last year, a four-fold increase compared to its donations for 2012. Primal Gives Back More Than One Million Dollars in 2013

Advocacy and charity focused cycling apparel company increases contributions

more than four-fold in one year

Primal Wear Gives Back

Primal, a premier manufacturer of cycling apparel headquartered in Denver, Colorado, donated more than a million dollars back to the cycling community in 2013 as a part of its ongoing commitment to the progression of cycling and cause-related organizations.

Through its dedication to sponsoring events and organizations that benefit people’s lives, Primal contributed more than $300,000 in cash and over $800,000 in product last year alone.

Overall, Primal’s charitable contributions increased more than four-fold in 2013. In 2012, Primal donated more than $220,000 to advocacy and charitable causes worldwide. This impressive increase can be attributed to several new national sponsorships and the continued growth of the Primal Gives Back program. Built on a solid foundation and strong sense of advocacy, Primal’s charitable contributions will continue to grow.

Through its support of more than 80 organizations around the world, Primal’s commitment to community is focused on fostering the growth of cycling through advocacy, charity, conservancy and competition. The company has been a long standing supporter of organizations such as the League of American Bicyclists, Bike MS, NICA, IMBA, Tour de Cure, Bicycle Colorado, People for Bikes, US Military Endurance Sports, Rails to Trails, the Alliance for Biking and Walking and Trips for Kids, among many more.

“Giving back is a part of our culture here at Primal,” said Dave Edwards, founder and president of Primal, “and as we’ve grown we have been able to drastically increase our commitments and support of organizations that make a difference in the cycling community and around the world.”

A major part of Primal’s contributions come through the Primal Gives Back Program, which is open to all teams who participate in a charitable cycling event. Through this program, Primal donates 15% of a team’s total custom order directly back to the company’s fundraising account. In 2013, the Gives Back Program generated more than $169,000 in additional fundraising for events like Pedal the Cause, Pan Mass Challenge, Bike MS, Tour de Cure, Courage Classic and the Dolphins Cycling Challenge.

Primal has already announced several new and continuing sponsorships for 2014, including partnerships with NICA, Bike MS, Tour de Cure, the National Bike Summit, Colorado Bicycle Summit, Sea Otter Classic and the Bicycle Leadership Conference.

To join the Primal Community and learn more about what you can do to help advance the cause, visit www.primalwear.com/community.

To learn more about Primal, visit www.primalwear.com

 
 

Stage 7 of USA Pro Challenge Decided: Boulder through Golden to Denver. 3 Bike Epicenters in 1 Day

Every stage is a story USA PRO CHALLENGE Aspen Snowmass Breckenridge steamboat springs beaver creek vail loveland fort collins denver
Final Stage of 2014 USA Pro Challenge facebook twitter rss
Final Stage of 2014 USA Pro Challenge will Take Riders Through
Iconic Parts of Colorado from Boulder through Golden to Denver
Fans Helped Shape Stage 7 of America’s Most Difficult Professional Cycling RaceDenver (Dec. 18, 2013) – The fans have spoken, and Stage 7 of the 2014 USA Pro Challenge professional cycling race will take riders from Boulder through Golden and over Lookout Mountain, finishing with three circuits around Downtown Denver. Just more than a month after the announcement of the first six stages and hearing the opinion of fans as to where Stage 7 should travel, the final day’s route has been determined.“The 2014 USA Pro Challenge is going to be the most exciting year yet,” said Rick Schaden, owner of the USA Pro Challenge. “Boulder, Golden and Denver have been such great hosts over the history of the race, so we decided to work them all into the final day of competition. These three iconic Colorado cycling locations are going to create one grand finale!”

Beginning in Boulder, which served as the Stage 6 finish in 2012, the race will travel through Golden, which saw record crowds as a start city in 2012, and finish with three laps around the State’s Capitol, which has served as the finish location every year of the race. The day also incorporates an incredibly challenging and fan-favorite climb on Lookout Mountain.

“Cycling fans are so passionate and such an important part of the sport, so we decided to give them a voice in the route selection process,” said Shawn Hunter, CEO of the USA Pro Challenge. “We wanted to try something new this year and by incorporating fan feedback we have come up with what is going to be an incredible final day of racing.”

Taking place Aug. 18-24, the host cities and stages of the 2014 USA Pro Challenge include:
• Stage 1: Monday, Aug. 18 – Aspen and Snowmass Village Circuit Race
• Stage 2: Tuesday, Aug. 19 – Aspen to Mt. Crested Butte
• Stage 3: Wednesday, Aug. 20 – Gunnison to Monarch Mountain (mountaintop finish)
• Stage 4: Thursday, Aug. 21 – Colorado Springs Circuit Race
• Stage 5: Friday, Aug. 22 – Woodland Park to Breckenridge
• Stage 6: Saturday, Aug. 23 – Vail Individual Time Trial
• Stage 7: Sunday, Aug. 24 – Boulder to Denver

Additional details regarding the start and finish locations of the 2014 race, as well as the specific, detailed route will be announced in the spring.

2013 host cities get the gear Facebook

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USA Pro Challenge gets jump on 2014 and announces host cities

Last day of race to be voted on by viewers and cyclists and Tom Danielson got his wish

The USA Pro Challenge has announced the 2014 race. The host start and finish cities are:

Stage 1: Monday, Aug. 18 – Aspen Circuit Race

Stage 2: Tuesday, Aug. 19 – Aspen to Mt. Crested Butte

Stage 3: Wednesday, Aug. 20 – Gunnison to Monarch Mountain (mountaintop finish)

Stage 4: Thursday, Aug. 21 – Colorado Springs Circuit Race

Stage 5: Friday, Aug. 22 – Woodland Park to Breckenridge

Stage 6: Saturday, Aug. 23 – Vail Individual Time Trial

Stage 7: Sunday, Aug. 24 – ???

The question mark for the final stage is a pretty neat finish idea. The public will get to vote for the final stage they want. The choices are:

Denver Circuit Race similar to the final stage of the 2013 race

Start in Golden (2012 Stage 6 start city) and finish in Denver

Start in Boulder (2012 Stage 6 finish city) and finish in Denver

Start in Boulder and end in Golden

Go here to vote on the race you want. What’s Your Vote For Stage 7? Voting gets you a 15% discount off USA Pro Challenge items in the store.

The course:

The course is similar to the very successful 2013 race. Cities with two things; money and people who want to watch a bicycle race are involved. So Aspen and Vail are probably always going to be on the race circuit. The turn out and support in Gunnison, Crested Butte and Mt Crested Butte is 100%, even though that is only 20% of what Vail turns out. Breckenridge and Colorado Springs are next as far as both and the perennial Denver is becoming the home to great cycling because of work of past volunteers and the USA Pro Challenge.

Merry Christmas Tom DanielsonIMG_3187

The only location with issues will be the finish on Monarch Mountain. This finish is a long way from Gunnison and close to Chaffee County, but still lacking in numbers of people. However it fulfills team Garmin Sharp’s Tom Danielson’s Christmas wish to have a mountain stage win at the Pro Challenge. Now he better win that stage!

But that will be a great finish no matter how many people. If you are a fan of the tour in Europe everyone watches, this will become a classic just like those finishes. It is a long and grueling climb. Probably only Wolf Creek Pass from the west is steeper. Finding a good place to see the race is going to be tough so get their early to stake out your spot.

Overall the race course looks fantastic so far. Until we see the actual routes we’ll not know the elevation or distances, however with the starts and finishes already picked this is destined to be another great week of cycling in Colorado.

It is going to be a great week of bicycle racing in Colorado.

See Host Cities Announced for 2014 USA Pro Challenge

What do you think? Leave a comment.

If you like this let your friends know or post it on FB, Twitter or LinkedIn

Copyright 2013 Recreation Law (720) Edit Law

Email: Rec-law@recreation-law.com

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Facebook Page: Outdoor Recreation & Adventure Travel Law

Blog:www.recreation-law.com

Mobile Site: http://m.recreation-law.com

By Recreation Law    Rec-law@recreation-law.com      James H. Moss         #Authorrank

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#RecreationLaw, #Recreation-Law.com, #OutdoorLaw, #OutdoorRecreationLaw, #AdventureTravelLaw, #law, #TravelLaw, #JimMoss, #JamesHMoss, #Tourism, #AdventureTourism, #Rec-Law, #RiskManagement, #CyclingLaw, #BicyclingLaw, #FitnessLaw, #Recreation-Law.com, #Backpacking, #Hiking, #Mountaineering, #IceClimbing, #RockClimbing, #RopesCourse, #ChallengeCourse, #SummerCamp, #Camps, #YouthCamps, #Skiing, #Ski Areas, #Negligence, #Snowboarding, #RecreationLaw, #@RecreationLaw, #Cycling.Law, #SkiLaw, #Outside.Law, #Recreation.Law, #RecreationLaw.com, #OutdoorLaw, #RecreationLaw, #OutdoorRecreationLaw, #AdventureTravelLaw, #Law, #TravelLaw, #JimMoss, #JamesHMoss, #AttorneyatLaw, #Tourism, #AdventureTourism, #RecLaw, #RecLawBlog, #RecreationLawBlog, #RiskManagement, #HumanPowered, #HumanPoweredRecreation,# CyclingLaw, #BicyclingLaw, #FitnessLaw, #RecreationLaw.com, #Backpacking, #Hiking, #Mountaineering, #IceClimbing, #RockClimbing, #RopesCourse, #ChallengeCourse, #SummerCamp, #Camps, #YouthCamps, #Skiing, #Ski Areas, #Negligence, #Snowboarding, sport and recreation laws, ski law, cycling law, Colorado law, law for recreation and sport managers, bicycling and the law, cycling and the law, ski helmet law, skiers code, skiing accidents, Recreation Lawyer, Ski Lawyer, Paddlesports Lawyer, Cycling Lawyer, Recreational Lawyer, Fitness Lawyer, Rec Lawyer, Challenge Course Lawyer, Ropes Course Lawyer, Zip Line Lawyer, Rock Climbing Lawyer, Adventure Travel Lawyer, Outside Lawyer, Recreation Lawyer, Ski Lawyer, Paddlesports Lawyer, Cycling Lawyer, #RecreationalLawyer, #FitnessLawyer, #RecLawyer, #ChallengeCourseLawyer, #RopesCourseLawyer, #ZipLineLawyer, #RockClimbingLawyer, #AdventureTravelLawyer, #OutsideLawyer, Good Samaritan, Samaritan, First Aid, USA Pro Challenge, #ProChallenge, Cycling, Bicycle Racing, Colorado, Aspen, Vail, Breckenridge, Gunnison, Crested Butte, Colorado Springs, Denver, Woodland Park

 

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Denver Bike Share is going Year Round!

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Denver B-cycle Will Stay Open All Year

Denver B-cycle today announced that it will keep stations running and stocked with bicycles through the winter.

“We have grown to the point where riders depend on the bikes as part of their daily transportation needs,” said interim executive director Nick Bohnenkamp. “Whether you need a B-cycle for regular recreation, commuting or the occasional trip or errand, the B-cycle option needs to remain available. Our users are loyal and the growing membership base demonstrates enthusiasm for the system. Every Coloradoan knows that winter can bring stretches of balmy weather and there’s no reason to limit choices for our members any month of the year. Thousands in Denver ride their bicycles all year long and Denver B-cycle needs to remain as a dependable, reliable part of the transportation landscape.”

During the first three seasons, the shared bikes were removed from the stations from mid-December to mid-March.

This year, Denver B-cycle opened 29 new stations, bringing the network to 82 stations. The network provides shared bicycles from the Highlands to Baker, from Five Points to Congress Park. There are over 700 bikes in the system.

Users buy memberships on a daily, monthly or annual basis. The first 30 minutes of any ride is free but usage fees apply for rides longer than 30 minutes, no matter the membership level. Bohnenkamp said the membership rates would not change, even with the additional three months of available service.

The stations are currently available from 5 a.m. to midnight. Beginning on December 2nd

the system will run on a slightly shorter winter schedule, from 6:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Regular operating hours will return in mid-March.

“The B-cycle system has been embraced by the city and we can feel the support growing every day,” said Bohnenkamp. “We deeply appreciate the ongoing support of our partners, sponsors and members. This increase in service is a natural evolution in our growth as a dependable, reliable option for getting around town. We believe that shared bikes make for a more livable and environmentally friendly city and we think that’s true whether the calendar says it’s winter, spring, summer or fall.”

About Denver Bike Sharing

Denver B-cycle is presented by Founding Funder Kaiser Permanente in association with a variety of community sponsors. Denver B-cycle is owned and operated by Denver Bike Sharing, a charitable, non-profit organization.

Denver Bike Sharing serves as a catalyst for a fundamental transformation in thinking and behavior by operating a bike sharing system in Denver to enhance mobility while promoting all aspects of sustainability: quality of life, equity, the environment, economic development, and public health.

To learn more about Denver Bike Sharing, the owner and operator of Denver B-cycle, visit denver.bcycle.com or call 303-825-3325.

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Marketing Makes Promises that Risk Management (or in this case an insurance policy) must pay for.

The release stopped the claims, which were thought out and tried to exploit the “accreditation” and “standards” created by a third party association.

Squires, v. Breckenridge Outdoor Education Center, 2013 U.S. App. LEXIS 9249 (10th Cir. 2013)

Plaintiff: Kimberly N. Squires

Defendant: Breckenridge Outdoor Education Center

Plaintiff Claims:

(1) The Release is as an invalid exculpatory agreement;

(2) Plaintiff’s decision to sign the Release was not voluntary and informed, as required by Colorado Revised Statute Section 13-22-107;

(3) Release was voidable because it was procured through fraud

Defendant Defenses: Release

Holding: for the defendant, the release was upheld

 

This case has been working its way through the courts for five years. The plaintiff was a legally blind child with cerebral palsy and cognitive delays. Her mother signed the necessary documentation to take a trip west with Camp Fire USA. Camp Fire USA contracted with the Breckenridge Outdoor Education Center (BOEC) to provide five days of skiing, a rope’s course and snow tubing.

The plaintiff was in a bi-ski which has an instructor holding tethers behind the skier. The BOEC instructor and the plaintiff were on their second run of the day. A third party skier lost control and skied into the tethers causing the BOEC instructor to lose the tethers. The plaintiff went down the hill unrestrained into a group of trees sustaining her injuries.

The plaintiff sued in Federal District Court located in Denver. A magistrate based upon a motion filed by the defendant dismissed the plaintiff’s negligence claim based on a release signed by the Plaintiff and her mother. The defendant’s motion also argued there was no evidence to support a gross negligence claim, which the magistrate did not deny.

The case proceeded to trial on the gross negligence claim. The jury returned a verdict for the defendant. The plaintiff then appealed the dismissal of the negligence claim based upon the release.

A magistrate is a quasi-judge. Magistrates in the Federal Court System are not appointed by the President and approved by the Senate, as all federal court judges are; but are appointed by the Chief Judge of the Federal District Court. The magistrate’s powers come from specific powers given to the magistrate by the judge who assigns a case to a magistrate or from an overall order from the Chief Judge of the court. Normally, a judge appoints a magistrate to handle all pre-trial matters. This frees up the judge to handle trials and those issues that may be appealed from the magistrate.

Summary of the case

The plaintiff appealed three issues concerning the validity of the release:

(1) the Release is as an invalid exculpatory agreement;

(2) [Plaintiff’s mother’s] decision to sign the Release was not voluntary and informed, as required by Colorado Revised Statute Section 13-22-107; [statute allowing a parent to sign away a child’s right to sue] and

(3) to the extent the Release is otherwise enforceable; it is, nevertheless, voidable because it was procured through fraud.

The 10th Circuit Court of Appeals went through a fairly in-depth analysis of release law in Colorado in making its decision. The court first looked into the requirements for a release to be valid under Colorado law. Releases are disfavored under Colorado law; however, they are not void. To be valid a Colorado Court must consider four factors:

(1) the existence of a duty to the public;

(2) the nature of the service performed;

(3) whether the contract was fairly entered into; and

(4) whether the intention of the parties is expressed in clear and unambiguous language

It was the fourth factor, whether the intent of the parties is set forth in clear and unambiguous language that is usually at issue. That means the language is clear and understandable so that the plaintiff when reading the document knew he or she was giving up their right to sue or recover for their injuries. The factor does not require the specific use of the word negligence and/or breach of warranty under Colorado law. However, the language of the release must express that the “intent of the parties was to extinguish liability and whether this intent was clearly and unambiguously expressed.”

Colorado courts look at the actual language of the release for “legal jargon” length, complication any likelihood of confusion or failure of the plaintiff to recognize the full extent of the release provisions. The court found that BOEC’s release met all of the requirements and was valid.

The plaintiff argued that the release failed to tell them that the plaintiff would be using a bi-ski and failed to disclose specific risks of this type of adaptive skiing. The court found that Colorado law did not require releases to refer to the specific activity that injured the plaintiff. Rather a release bars a claim if the release “clearly reflects the parties’ intent to extinguish liability for that type of claim.”

Note: the relaxed language allowed under Colorado law is not the same in other courts.

The plaintiff also developed a novel argument, which I have touched on before.

Plaintiff additionally argues the Release is ambiguous because it does not specifically release claims resulting from the negligence of third parties, such as the skier who collided with Plaintiff, and because it inconsistently allocates risks between herself and Defendant.

Many times a third party or even another participant is the reason for the plaintiff’s injury. I write about injured parties suing other guests or third parties, such as skier v. skier collisions. Although the complaint does not name the outdoor recreation provider, specifically as a defendant, it does bring them in tangentially to a lawsuit. Here, the plaintiff argued the release failed because it did not notice the plaintiff of the risks brought to skiing by third parties.

However, the argument was not properly preserved or argued in the lower court so this court did not look at the argument. Appellate courts only will hear arguments that have been heard or argued in the lower court. Brand new arguments are ignored on appeal. It is important to argue everything you can in the lower court, to preserve all issues for appeal. This works both for claims of the plaintiff or defenses of the defendant.

The next argument, was there was not enough information in the release to satisfy the requirements of the statute which allows a parent to sign away a minor’s right to sue (C.R.S. 13-22-107). The plaintiff argued that because the risks of skiing in a bi-ski were not understood by the mother then the release should fail.

The court looked at two prior cases in Colorado that had looked at this issue: Wycoff v. Grace Cmty. Church of the Assemblies of God, 251 P.3d 1260, 1264 (Colo. App. 2010) and Hamill v. Cheley Colo. Camps, Inc., 262 P.3d 945, 952 (Colo. App. 2011) which I discuss in Releases are legal documents and need to be written by an attorney that understands the law and the risks of your program/business/activity and your guests/members/clientele and Release stops suit for falling off horse at Colorado summer Camp.

Because the release did not state the risks of the activity, the court had to decide if it could look at extrinsic (other) evidence. The court in Hamel, allowed the defendant to show that prior experience of the parent in sending her daughter to camp and knowledge of other people who had been injured horseback riding was enough to show the mother knew the risks.

The court then allowed the knowledge of the mother and the letter sent with the release by BOEC to show the mother knew the general risks of skiing.

The final issue was the Fraudulent Inducement claim. The letter said the following:

(1) “All of [Defendant’s] activities are conducted in a manner consistent with the highest standards, as defined by the Association for Experiential Education (AEE)”; (2) “The BOEC is accredited by AEE”; and (3) AEE “independently reviews the policies, practices and educational components of applicant organizations and accredits those that meet their high standards.

The mother made the following statements concerning what she believed based upon the letter.

Rather, she [plaintiff] relies on her mother’s statements that she “believed that BOEC was an accredited program,” and “that they had an [sic] accredited certified instructors that would manage a safe program.”

(“[T]hey were, you know, accredited and certified and they’d been doing it for a number of years.”), 356 (“That she would be with certified accredited people in a safe program that they could supervise appropriately.”).)

Although BOEC may or may not have been accredited by the AEE, the issue was the AEE did not have standards for skiing or adaptive skiing. The plaintiff argued that the letter, on one side of the release contradicted the release which was on the other side of the paper.

Add to the issue that BOEC admitted that it did not have what it advertised.

BOEC representative and Ski Program Director Paul Gamber testified that on the day of the Accident, BOEC did not have any written ski lesson policies and procedures for the adaptive ski program. Ski Program Director, Jeffrey Inouye, testified that the AEE accreditation related to programs other than the adaptive  [*30] ski program that Ms. Squires attended.

Marketing makes promises that Risk Management has to pay for.

The plaintiff argued that there was fraud in the inducement and because BOEC had advertised standards, BOEC did not have. On top of that the plaintiff argued that because BOEC did not have standards as they advertised BOEC was also misleading the plaintiff.

Ms. Squires argues that based upon the lack of written safety standards, “it is not a stretch to conclude that the adaptive skiing program was not conducted in a manner consistent with the highest standards of the AEE, contrary to the representations made by BOEC in its Greetings Letter.”

The letter and marketing of BOEC were enough to establish a fraud claim.

To establish fraud, a plaintiff has to prove that (1) a fraudulent misrepresentation of material fact was made by the defendant; (2) at the time the representation was made, the defendant knew the representation was false or was aware that he did not know whether the representation was true or false; (3) the plaintiff relied on the misrepresentation; (4) the plaintiff had the right to rely on, or was justified in relying on, the misrepresentation; and (5) the reliance resulted in damages.

The release was presented to the plaintiff’s mother along with a “LETTER TO STUDENTS, PARENTS AND GUARDIANS.” The letter made several statements which the plaintiff brought to the attention of the court, which created legal issues that in many courts in other states, would have found for the plaintiff. Some of the parts of the letter were:

All of our activities are conducted in a manner consistent with the highest standards, as defined by the Association for Experiential Education (AEE). The BOEC is accredited by AEE, who independently reviews the policies, practices and educational components of applicant organizations and accredits those that meet their high standards.

Your ski lesson or course will involve risk, which may be greater than most people encounter in their daily lives. Providing high quality programs in a risk-managed environment is a priority at the BOEC. It is, however, impossible to eliminate all risks.

While the BOEC maintains rigorous standards, it is in everyone’s best interest that risks are disclosed, understood, and assumed prior to participation.

The plaintiff could not prove that she had relied on the misstatements of BOEC. On top of the necessary requirement that there be reliance, the fraud or action of BOEC must be intentional.

Ms. Squires has not produced any evidence that BOEC made the alleged misrepresentations with the intent to deceive. For failure to demonstrate this element, Ms. Squires’ argument that the Release is voidable based on material misrepresentation and fraud in the inducement must fail.

Because the fourth element could not be provided the fraud claim was dismissed.

The final argument made by the plaintiff was the actions of BOEC were willful and wanton. The statute Colo. Rev. Stat. § 13-22-107(4) specifically prohibited releases signed by parents based to stop willful and wanton conduct.

Nothing in this section shall be construed to permit a parent acting on behalf of his or her child to waive the child’s prospective claim against a person or entity for a willful and wanton act or omission, a reckless act or omission, or a grossly negligent act or omission.

Court defined willful and wanton conduct by relating the conduct to gross negligence.

“Gross negligence is willful and wanton conduct; that is, action committed recklessly, with conscious disregard for the safety of others.” “Willful and wanton conduct is purposeful conduct committed recklessly that exhibits an intent consciously to disregard the safety of others. Such conduct extends beyond mere unreasonableness.” (“Conduct is willful and wanton if it is a dangerous course of action that is consciously chosen with knowledge of facts, which to a reasonable mind creates a strong probability that injury to others will result.”)

However, here again the plaintiff failed to show conduct that was purposeful or reckless. The court found the record was “devoid of sufficient evidence to raise a factual issue” at trial. Finding that the court held that claim was not met by the plaintiff.

So Now What?

The release in this case met the requirements of Colorado law. However, most other states, the release would not have been sufficient to stop the claims of the plaintiff. Besides, few states allow a parent to sign away a minor’s right to sue. See States that allow a parent to sign away a minor’s right to sue.

BOEC does great work and does a good job. This like most facts giving rise to litigation are rare, even very rare. However, your release needs to be written to cover everything you possibly can. You can include a prohibition against injuries or claims caused by third parties. Would the outcome of this case been different if the third party who skied into the tethers been another BOEC student or instructor?

Releases can also be used to educate. If you do a good job of describing the risks in the release, then parents cannot make valid decisions, on whether or not they want to risk your kid with them. The defendant should have done a better job of explaining the risks of all activities within the program.

It is risky to rely upon outside information to prove knowledge of a release, unless you can prove the person saw and knew the information and have that proof in the release. This creates a 2-step process. 1.) You must prove you educated the customer or guest and 2.) You must prove the guest or customer was educated. The easiest way is to place this information on your website and then have your release reference the information.

Marketing makes promises that Risk Management must pay for. The advertising and statements made by the defendant in this case in many other jurisdictions would have gone the other way. Seriously, to make statements about awards, accreditation, or standards that do not exist are a great way to void a release and in many states increase the damages you may pay.

Other Cases: Squires v. Goodwin, 2011 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 129234 (Dist Colo 2011)

Other articles where standards played a part in the decision in a negative way.

ACA Standards are used by Expert for the Plaintiff in a lawsuit against a Camp

Expert Witness Report: ACA “Standards” are used by Expert for the Plaintiff in a lawsuit against a Camp

Plaintiff uses standards of ACCT to cost defendant $4.7 million

Trade Association Standards sink a Summer Camp when plaintiff uses them to prove Camp was negligent

 

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Squires v. Breckenridge Outdoor Education Center, 715 F.3d 867; 2013 U.S. App. LEXIS 9249 (Co Dist 2013)

Squires v. Breckenridge Outdoor Education Center, 715 F.3d 867; 2013 U.S. App. LEXIS 9249 (Co Dist 2013)

KIMBERLY N. SQUIRES, Plaintiff – Appellant, v. BRECKENRIDGE OUTDOOR EDUCATION CENTER, Defendant – Appellee.

No. 12-1199

UNITED STATES COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE TENTH CIRCUIT

715 F.3d 867; 2013 U.S. App. LEXIS 9249

May 7, 2013, Filed

PRIOR HISTORY: [**1]
APPEAL FROM THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLORADO. (D.C. No.1:10-CV-00309-CBS-BNB).
Squires v. Goodwin, 829 F. Supp. 2d 1062, 2011 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 129234 (D. Colo., 2011)

COUNSEL: Michael A. Sink of Perkins Coie LLP, Denver, Colorado (Robert N. Miller and Stephanie E. Dunn of Perkins Coie LLP, Denver, Colorado; Gregory A. Gold of The Gold Law Firm, LLC, Greenwood Village, Colorado; and T. Thomas Metier of Metier Law Firm, LLC, Fort Collins, Colorado, with him on the brief), for Plaintiff – Appellant.
David Werber (John W. Grund, Deana R. Dagner, and Joan S. Allgaier on the brief) of Grund ” Dagner, P.C., Denver, Colorado, for Defendant – Appellee.
JUDGES: Before HARTZ, McKAY, and O’BRIEN, Circuit Judges.
OPINION BY: McKAY
OPINION

[*869] McKAY, Circuit Judge.

Plaintiff Kimberly Squires filed this diversity action against Defendant Breckenridge Outdoor Education Center asserting claims for negligence and gross negligence following a ski accident in which she was injured. The magistrate judge granted Defendant’s motion for summary judgment in part, concluding Plaintiff’s mother, Sara Squires, had validly released any claim for negligence against Defendant by signing an acknowledgment of risk and release of liability. Plaintiff now appeals, arguing summary judgment was inappropriate because the Release [**2] is unenforceable for three reasons: (1) the Release is as an invalid exculpatory agreement; (2) Mrs. Squires’s decision to sign the Release was not voluntary and informed, as required by [*870] Colorado Revised Statute Section 13-22-107; and (3) to the extent the Release is otherwise enforceable, it is nevertheless voidable because it was procured through fraud.

Background

In 2008, Plaintiff, a legally blind child with cerebral palsy and cognitive delays, was severely injured while skiing at Breckenridge Ski Resort in Colorado. Plaintiff was in Breckenridge on a ski trip with the group Camp Fire USA, a non-profit organization dedicated to providing children, including children with disabilities, with opportunities and experiences for growth. Camp Fire USA had contracted with Defendant for a five-day wilderness program that included skiing, a ropes course, and snow tubing.

Before the trip, Defendant sent documents regarding the trip to Camp Fire USA, which in turn circulated them to the participants’ parents, including Mrs. Squires. The documents included a “Letter to Students, Parents and Guardians” (App. at 209 (capitalization omitted)) with an accompanying “Acknowledg[]ment of Risk & Release [**3] of Liability” (App. at 210 (capitalization omitted)).1 The Letter states, in pertinent part:

LETTER TO STUDENTS, PARENTS AND GUARDIANS

Greetings from Breckenridge! The BOEC staff looks forward to having you, your child or your family member join us on a course and would like to share the following information about who we are, what we do and the risks involved.

The Breckenridge Outdoor Education Center (BOEC), a non-profit organization in operation since 1976, provides outdoor adventure programs for people of all abilities. We offer programs for groups and individuals. All courses are tailored to the specific goals and abilities of our students.

. . . .

All of our activities are conducted in a manner consistent with the highest standards, as defined by the Association for Experiential Education (AEE). The BOEC is accredited by AEE, who independently reviews the policies, practices and educational components of applicant organizations and accredits those that meet their high standards. All activities offered are designed to pose appropriate challenges for students. These challenges provide a medium for adventure, learning and personal growth. Your ski lesson or course will involve risk, [**4] which may be greater than most people encounter in their daily lives. Providing high quality programs in a risk-managed environment is a priority at the BOEC. It is, however, impossible to eliminate all [*871] risks. It is very important that you follow all directions given by staff and that you ask questions whenever a procedure or activity is unclear to you.

While the BOEC maintains rigorous standards, it is in everyone’s best interest that risks are disclosed, understood, and assumed prior to participation. After you have reviewed the acknowledg[]ment of risk and waiver of liability on the reverse side of this letter and if you understand and agree with its contents, please sign in the appropriate places. If you are the parent or legal guardian of a student, please read both sides of this document to the student, and if you both agree and understand their content, place YOUR signature in the three appropriate places.

If you have any questions or comments, please do not hesitate to contact us. We welcome your suggestions and feedback.

(App. at 209.)

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – Footnotes – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

1 It is somewhat unclear whether the Release signed by Mrs. Squires was presented to her as a separate document from the Letter or as a single document [**5] with the Letter printed on one side and the Release printed on the reverse. The Letter itself refers to the Release “on the reverse side of this letter.” (App. at 209.) Plaintiff likewise initially represented the Release appeared on the reverse of the Letter. (Appellant’s Opening Br. at 6 (“On the back of the form cover letter, is a standardized “Acknowledg[]ment of Risk & Release of Liability” . . . .).) However, during oral argument, Plaintiff’s counsel maintained this was a disputed issue. (Oral Argument at 4:03-18 (“Some copies of the Release are standalone copies, and one copy happens to have a bleed-over language from the cover letter. It’s not clear . . . that that’s how that actually occurred when the Release was given to [Mrs. Squires] for signature.”) It is undisputed, however, that the Release the director of Camp Fire USA sent to the participants “included the cover letter that explained the waiver” (App. at 207), and that the two documents were sent as a single attachment (App. at 404, 407, 408).

– – – – – – – – – – – – End Footnotes- – – – – – – – – – – – – –

The accompanying Release provides:

ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF RISK AND RELEASE OF LIABILITY (REQUIRED)

In consideration of being allowed to participate in any way in Breckenridge Outdoor [**6] Education Center (BOEC) programs, and related events and activities . . . I, and/or the minor student, . . . the undersigned:

1. Understand that although the BOEC has taken precautions to provide proper organization, supervision, instruction and equipment for each course, it is impossible for the BOEC to guarantee absolute safety. Also, I understand that I share the responsibility for safety during all activities, and I assume that responsibility. I will make my instructors aware to the best of my ability of any questions or concerns regarding my understanding of safety standards, guidelines, procedures and my ability to participate at any point during any activity.

2. Understand that risks during outdoor programs include but are not limited to loss or damage to personal property, injury, permanent disability, fatality, exposure to inclement weather, slipping, falling, insect or animal bites, being struck by falling objects, immersion in cold water, hypothermia (cold exposure), hyperthermia (heat exposure), and severe social or economic losses that may result from any such incident. I also understand that such accidents or illnesses may occur in remote areas without easy access to medical [**7] facilities or while traveling to and from the activity sites. Further, there may be other risks not known to me or not reasonably foreseeable at this time.
3. Agree that prior to participation, I will inspect, to the best of my ability, the facilities and equipment to be used. If I believe anything is unsafe, I will immediately advise the BOEC staff present of such condition and refuse to participate.
4. Assume all the foregoing risks and accept personal responsibility for the damages due to such injury, permanent disability or death resulting from participating in any BOEC activity.

I hereby release the BOEC, its successors, representatives, assigns, and employees from any and all claims, demands, and causes of action, whether resulting from negligence or otherwise, of every nature and in conjunction with a BOEC activity.

(App. at 210.)

Plaintiff and her mother signed the Release on January 13, 2008. On that date, Mrs. Squires was admittedly aware that her daughter’s trip to Breckenridge and participation in Defendant’s program [*872] would include skiing, although she claims she was unaware of the precise equipment and methods her daughter would be using. Once in Breckenridge, Plaintiff was [**8] paired with a BOEC instructor and equipped with a bi-ski. On the second run of the first day of skiing, Plaintiff was injured when another, unrelated, skier lost control and skied into the tethers connecting Plaintiff and her instructor. The force of the collision caused the instructor to lose control of the tethers, and Plaintiff continued unrestrained down the trail and into a group of trees. She was injured when her bi-ski collided with a tree.

Following the accident, Plaintiff filed this action claiming Defendant’s negligence and gross negligence caused her injuries. Defendant moved for summary judgment, arguing the Release barred Plaintiff’s negligence claim and there was no evidence to support her gross negligence claim. The magistrate judge granted summary judgment in favor of Defendant on Plaintiff’s negligence claim, concluding Plaintiff’s mother had executed an enforceable exculpatory agreement that clearly and unambiguously expressed the parties’ intent to extinguish Defendant’s liability, and her decision to do so was voluntary and informed. The magistrate judge, however, denied Defendant’s motion on Plaintiff’s gross negligence claim. This claim proceeded to a jury, which [**9] found Defendant not liable. Plaintiff now appeals the grant of summary judgment on her negligence claim.

Discussion

HN1Go to this Headnote in the case.“We review a district court’s decision to grant summary judgment de novo, applying the same standard as the district court.” Lundstrom v. Romero, 616 F.3d 1108, 1118 (10th Cir. 2010) (internal quotation marks omitted). Summary judgment is appropriate if “there is no genuine dispute as to any material fact and the movant is entitled to judgment as a matter of law.” Fed. R. Civ. P. 56(a). Colorado law applies in this diversity case.

I. Enforceability of the Release

Plaintiff argues the Release is unenforceable and, therefore, does not bar her negligence claim. She reasons that the Release is invalid under the four-part test articulated in Jones v. Dressel, 623 P.2d 370 (Colo. 1981), and that her mother did not make an informed decision, as required by Colorado Revised Statute Section 13-22-107.

A. Validity Under Jones

HN2Go to this Headnote in the case.In Colorado, “[a]greements attempting to exculpate a party from that party’s own negligence have long been disfavored.” Heil Valley Ranch, Inc. v. Simkin, 784 P.2d 781, 783 (Colo. 1989). However, “[e]xculpatory agreements are not necessarily void.” Id. at 784. In [**10] determining whether an exculpatory agreement is valid, Colorado courts consider four factors: “(1) the existence of a duty to the public; (2) the nature of the service performed; (3) whether the contract was fairly entered into; and (4) whether the intention of the parties is expressed in clear and unambiguous language.” Jones, 623 P.2d at 376. Plaintiff challenges only the magistrate judge’s conclusion on the fourth factor.

Under the fourth factor, “use of the specific terms ‘negligence’ and ‘breach of warranty’ are not invariably required for an exculpatory agreement to shield a party from claims based on negligence and breach of warranty.” Heil Valley, 784 P.2d at 785. Rather, “[t]he inquiry should be whether the intent of the parties was to extinguish liability and whether this intent was clearly and unambiguously expressed.” Id. In making this determination, [*873] Colorado courts examine “the actual language of the agreement for legal jargon, length and complication, and any likelihood of confusion or failure of a party to recognize the full extent of the release provisions.” Chadwick v. Colt Ross Outfitters, Inc., 100 P.3d 465, 467 (Colo. 2004).

The Release signed by Plaintiff and her [**11] mother clearly and unambiguously waives any negligence claims Plaintiff might have brought against Defendant. The Release begins by indicating it is signed “[i]n consideration of being allowed to participate in any way in Breckenridge Outdoor Education Center (BOEC) programs, and related events and activities.” (App. at 104.) It then warns that “it is impossible for the BOEC to guarantee absolute safety,” and identifies the potential risk of “loss or damage to personal property, injury, permanent disability, [and] fatality.” (Id.) The Release concludes, after only five short paragraphs, by stating in plain terms that the signor “hereby release[s] the BOEC, its successors, representatives, assigns, and employees from any and all claims, demands and causes of action, whether resulting from negligence or otherwise, of every nature and in conjunction with a BOEC activity.” (Id. (emphasis added).) We perceive no ambiguity in this language. See Mincin v. Vail Holdings, Inc., 308 F.3d 1105, 1113 (10th Cir. 2002) (“The agreement covers ‘any and all claims I might state . . . including those claims based on negligence or breach of warranty.’ . . . There is nothing ambiguous about this portion [**12] of the agreement.” (first alteration in original)).

Plaintiff, however, contends the Release does not satisfy the fourth Jones factor because it failed to include that Plaintiff would be skiing using a bi-ski and failed to disclose specific risks associated with this form of adaptive skiing. She argues that Colorado law requires the Release to identify the specific activity being engaged in and describe specific associated risks. In support of this position, Plaintiff quotes from several other releases that have been upheld and claims it was their adequate detailing of risks that led the courts to conclude they were valid under the fourth Jones factor. However, even though the releases quoted by Plaintiff contain more detailed descriptions of the associated risks, their validity did not turn on this fact. Notably, none of the cases Plaintiff relies on evaluated the sufficiency of the description of the risks.

Contrary to Plaintiff’s argument, HN3Go to this Headnote in the case.Colorado law does not require that exculpatory agreements refer to the specific activity in which the plaintiff participated and was injured. See Forman v. Brown, 944 P.2d 559, 563-64 (Colo. App. 1996) (concluding a release that did not mention [**13] the specific activity in which the plaintiff was injured was nevertheless valid because it “unambiguously released defendants from liability for injuries occurring during associated scheduled or unscheduled activities”); Brooks v. Timberline Tours, Inc., 127 F.3d 1273, 1274-75 (10th Cir. 1997) (concluding a release that did not include the specific activity and referred only to “the activity I am about to voluntarily engage in” was valid under Jones). Nor does it require “that an exculpatory agreement describe in detail each specific risk that the signor might encounter. Rather, an exculpatory agreement bars a claim if the agreement clearly reflects the parties’ intent to extinguish liability for that type of claim.” Lahey v. Covington, 964 F. Supp. 1440, 1445 (D. Colo. 1996), aff’d sub nom. Lahey v. Twin Lakes Expeditions, Inc., No. 96-1438, 1997 U.S. App. LEXIS 11807, 1997 WL 265093 (10th Cir. May 20, 1997) (unpublished) (citation omitted). The Release clearly reflects precisely such an intent—Plaintiff and her mother agreed, “[i]n consideration of being [*874] allowed to participate in . . . [Defendant’s] programs, and related events and activities” to “release [Defendant] from any and all claims . . . and causes [**14] of action, whether resulting from negligence or otherwise, of every nature and in conjunction with a [BOEC] activity.” (App. at 104.)

Plaintiff additionally argues the Release is ambiguous because it does not specifically release claims resulting from the negligence of third parties, such as the skier who collided with Plaintiff, and because it inconsistently allocates risks between herself and Defendant. Plaintiff raises her first theory of ambiguity for the first time on appeal. Because this argument was not properly preserved, we do not consider it. Lyons v. Jefferson Bank & Trust, 994 F.2d 716, 721 (10th Cir. 1993) (HN4Go to this Headnote in the case.“[A] party may not lose in the district court on one theory of the case, and then prevail on appeal on a different theory.”). Turning then to Plaintiff’s second theory of ambiguity, we agree with the magistrate judge’s conclusion that the Release is not reasonably susceptible to her interpretation, which strains logic. Plaintiff specifically argues the portion of the Release that releases Defendant from liability is rendered ambiguous by the following sentence: “I [**15] understand that I share the responsibility for safety during all activities, and I assume that responsibility.” (App. at 104.) She contends that by “discussing two alternate allocations of risk in the same document, the Release does not clearly and unambiguously express the intent of the parties, and thus, is unenforceable.” (Appellant’s Opening Br. at 23.) However, these two provisions create no such ambiguity. The sentence on which Plaintiff relies clearly expresses the participant’s agreement to share in the responsibility of participating in a safe manner, whereas the release provision clearly expresses the participant’s intent to release Defendant from liability. As the magistrate judge concluded, the two are not mutually exclusive, and the first provision makes it no less clear that Plaintiff’s mother intended to release Defendant from liability for any negligence claim.

Because the Release contains clear and unambiguous language demonstrating Plaintiff’s mother intended to release any negligence claims Plaintiff might have against Defendant, it is valid and enforceable under Jones.

B. Informed Decision Under Colorado Revised Statute Section 13-22-107

We turn then to whether Mrs. [**16] Squires’s consent to the Release was voluntary and informed, as required by Section 13-22-107. Plaintiff argues it was not because her mother did not understand the risks involved with adaptive skiing and, specifically, the use of bi-skis.

In 2002, the Colorado Supreme Court held “that Colorado’s public policy disallows a parent or guardian to execute exculpatory provisions on behalf of his minor child for a prospective claim based on negligence.” Cooper v. Aspen Skiing Co., 48 P.3d 1229, 1237 (Colo. 2002), superseded by statute, Colo. Rev. Stat. § 13-22-107(3). The following year, the General Assembly superseded Cooper through enactment of Section 13-22-107(3). Under this section,HN5Go to this Headnote in the case. “[a] parent of a child may, on behalf of the child, release or waive the child’s prospective claim for negligence.” Colo. Rev. Stat. § 13-22-107(3). The statute “declare[s] that parents have a fundamental right to make decisions on behalf of their children, including deciding whether the children should participate in risky activities.” Wycoff v. Grace Cmty. Church of the Assemblies of God, 251 P.3d 1260, 1264 (Colo. App. 2010). “So long as the decision is voluntary and informed, the decision should be given [**17] the same dignity as decisions [*875] regarding schooling, medical treatment, and religious education . . . .” Colo. Rev. Stat. § 13-22-107(1)(a)(V).

The Colorado Court of Appeals has “assume[d] that the General Assembly was aware of the Jones test when it enacted section 13-22-107(1)(a)(V), but required something more for the waiver of a minor’s prospective negligence claims.” Hamill v. Cheley Colo. Camps, Inc., 262 P.3d 945, 952 (Colo. App. 2011) (citation omitted). In addition to the Jones factors, “[t]he General Assembly required that the consent to waiver by a parent be ‘voluntary and informed.'” Id. “A parent’s decision is informed when the parent has sufficient [*876] information to assess the potential degree of risks involved, and the extent of possible injury.” Id.

Since the enactment of Section 13-22-107, the Colorado Supreme Court has not addressed whether a release satisfies the voluntary and informed requirement of Section 13-22-107(1)(a)(V). We must therefore attempt to predict how Colorado’s highest court would interpret this Section. See FDIC v. Schuchmann, 235 F.3d 1217, 1225 (10th Cir. 2000). In doing so, we “consider . . . cases from the Colorado Court of Appeals only as they may [**18] aid our ability to predict how the Colorado Supreme Court might decide.” Browning v. Am. Family Mut. Ins. Co., 396 F. App’x 496, 502 n.14 (10th Cir. 2010).

The Colorado Court of Appeals has twice considered whether a parent’s consent to release prospective negligence claims on behalf of a minor child was voluntary and informed, as required by Section 13-22-107(1)(a)(V). On the first occasion, the Colorado Court of Appeals determined it “need not set forth . . . precisely how much information is required for a parental release to satisfy the statute” because “[t]here is no information in [the] one-page registration form describing the event activities, much less their associated risks.” Wycoff, 251 P.3d at 1264. There, the plaintiff was injured while being towed in an innertube behind an ATV on a frozen lake as part of her participation in a three-day event called “Winterama 2005.” Id. at 1263. Before attending the event, the plaintiff’s mother signed a one-page registration and information form, which contained a purported release in the following paragraph:

I give permission for my child to participate in . . . Winterama 2005 and all activities associated with it. I further give consent [**19] for any medical treatment necessary to be given to my child in case of injury or sickness. I will not hold Grace Community Church or it’s [sic] participants responsible for any liability which may result from participation. I also agree to come and pick up my child should they not obey camp rules.

Id. (emphasis and correction in original). Although the plaintiff knew the Winterama activities would include riding on an ATV-towed innertube, her mother did not. The court concluded that the mother’s waiver was not informed because the registration and information form did “not indicate what the activities would involve and certainly d[id] not suggest they would include ATV-towed inner-tube excursions around a frozen lake.” Id. at 1264. As a result, there was no information from which the plaintiff’s parents could “assess the degree of risk and the extent of possible injuries” from her participation in Winterama. Id. at 1265.

Shortly after the Wycoff decision, the Colorado Court of Appeals again addressed whether a parent’s consent to release prospective negligence claims on behalf of her child was informed. Borrowing from the language used in Wycoff, the court began by stating, HN6Go to this Headnote in the case.“A parent’s [**20] decision is informed when the parent has sufficient information to assess the potential degree of risks involved, and the extent of possible injury.” Hamill, 262 P.3d at 952 (citing Wycoff, 251 P.3d at 1265). In addressing the degree of risk, the court concluded the plaintiff’s mother was sufficiently informed about the risks involved in horseback riding, the activity in which the plaintiff was injured, because she “knew her daughter would be riding horses and she was advised that there were risks, known and unknown, associated with the activity.” Id. at 953. In reaching this conclusion, the court first relied on the undisputed fact that the plaintiff’s mother “knew the activities [the camp] offered,” because her daughter “had attended [the camp] and ridden the camp horses for two years before the accident.” Id. at 952. In addition, “[t]he agreement clearly indicated that horseback riding was an activity available to campers.” Id. The agreement further identified some of the “risks associated with participation in any camping activities,” and emphasized that “a complete listing of inherent and other risks is not possible” and there are even “risks which cannot be anticipated.” Id. at 949 [**21] (emphasis omitted). The court finally considered the fact that the plaintiff’s mother “never contacted [the camp] to discuss the release form, and had no questions about the language of the release form when she signed it.” Id. at 953. In light of all of this evidence, the court concluded the plaintiff’s mother was adequately informed of the risks involved with horseback riding. The fact that she “may not have contemplated the precise mechanics of her daughter’s fall d[id] not invalidate the release and d[id] not create a genuine issue of material fact.” Id. The relevant inquiry was whether the plaintiff’s mother was aware the plaintiff would be riding horses and was advised there were risks associated with that activity, which she was.

The court then turned to whether the plaintiff’s mother was provided with sufficient information “to assess the extent of possible injuries to [her daughter].” Id. In making this determination, the court again considered both the language of the release and the plaintiff’s mother’s independent knowledge and experience. The release contained broad language waiving “any claims of liability, for any injury, even death.” Id. (internal quotation marks omitted). [**22] The plaintiff’s mother was further aware that Christopher Reeve, whom she knew personally, had been injured falling off a horse, and was therefore “aware that there were significant risks associated with horseback riding.” Id. The court thus concluded that the agreement adequately disclosed the extent of potential injuries; it “did not need to include an exhaustive list of particularized injury scenarios to be effective.” Id.

Before turning to whether Plaintiff’s mother’s consent to release prospective negligence claims against Defendant was informed, we must first address the scope of the evidence we may consider in making this determination. The Colorado courts have yet to specifically address this issue. In Wycoff, the court “assume[d] for purposes of th[e] case that a facially deficient exculpatory contract could be cured by extrinsic evidence.” 251 P.3d at 1264. Relying on this statement, Plaintiff contends our evaluation under Section 13-22-107(1)(a)(V) must be limited to the four corners of the Release unless we first determine that the Release itself is facially deficient, in which case the Release would be invalid under Jones. Defendant, on the other hand, maintains we may [**23] properly consider the Letter that accompanied the Release as well as Mrs. Squires’s actual knowledge on the day she signed the Release.

[*877] We predict the Colorado Supreme Court would likely follow the approach advocated by Defendant and adopted by the Colorado Court of Appeals in Hamill—in determining whether a parent’s consent to release prospective negligence claims is voluntary and informed, the parent’s actual knowledge and the information provided in connection with the release should be considered in addition to the language of the release itself. Unlike the fourth factor of the common-law Jones test, which focuses on whether the agreement itself expressed the parties’ intention in clear and unambiguous terms, the focus of the voluntary and informed requirement of Section 13-22-107(1)(a)(V) is on the parent’s decision. If we were to limit our review to the language of the Release itself, we would not be in a position to adequately evaluate whether the parent’s decision was informed. HN7Go to this Headnote in the case.To “give[] effect to the General Assembly’s intent in enacting” Section 13-22-107, Carlson v. Ferris, 85 P.3d 504, 508 (Colo. 2003)—that a parent’s decision to release his or her child’s prospective negligence [**24] claims be honored “[s]o long as the decision is voluntary and informed,” Colo. Rev. Stat. § 13-22-107(1)(a)(V)—we must be able to consider the relevant information the parent had and was provided in order to make that decision. Indeed, were we to limit our review to the language of the Release itself, it would put the General Assembly’s enactment of § 13-22-107 at odds with Jones. Providers of recreational activities would be required to incorporate all relevant information they supplied to parents within the release itself while simultaneously ensuring the release is not “inordinately long or complicated,” Heil Valley, 784 P.2d at 785. To avoid such a result and give the fullest effect to the General Assembly’s intent, we consider not only the language of the Release, but also the information Defendant provided to Plaintiff and Mrs. Squires in connection with the Release as well as Mrs. Squire’s actual knowledge on the date she signed the Release.

Considering this evidence, we conclude Mrs. Squires’s decision to release Plaintiff’s prospective negligence claims against Defendant was informed. Mrs. Squires had sufficient information from which to evaluate the degree of risk Plaintiff [**25] faced. She admittedly knew “when she signed the document . . . that her daughter was going on a ski trip.” (App. at 139.) The Letter addressed to the students and their parents specifically referred to “[y]our ski lesson” (App. at 209), and the accompanying participant application identified “Sit-Down” and “Bi-ski” as among the “Adaptive Ski Method[s]” (App. at 410) offered by Defendant. The Letter further informed Mrs. Squires that Plaintiff’s “ski lesson . . . will involve risk, which may be greater than most people encounter in their daily lives.” (App. at 209.) The Release reaffirmed that “it is impossible for BOEC to guarantee absolute safety,” and warned that in addition to the “risks during outdoor programs,” including “falling,” “there may be other risks not known . . . or not reasonable foreseeable at this time.” (App. at 210.) After receiving this information, Mrs. Squires did not contact Defendant to discuss the Release and did not inquire as to the risks that were going to be involved with the ski trip. Although Mrs. Squires “may not have contemplated the precise mechanics of her daughter’s fall,” including the precise mechanics of skiing with a bi-ski, this fact “does [**26] not invalidate the release.” Hamill, 262 P.3d at 953. Like the mother in Hamill, Mrs. Squires “knew her daughter would be [skiing] and she was advised that there were risks, known and unknown, associated with the activity.” Id.

Mrs. Squires likewise had sufficient information from which to assess the extent [*878] of possible injuries to Plaintiff. The Release contained broad language releasing “any and all claims,” “of every nature,” “whether resulting from negligence or otherwise.” (App. at 210.) The Release additionally specifically warned of the possibility of “injury, permanent disability, fatality . . . and severe social or economic losses that may result from any such incident.” (Id.) Contrary to Plaintiff’s argument, the Release “did not need to include an exhaustive list of particularized injury scenarios,” such as the possibility of colliding with a tree after the instructor lost control of the tethers, “to be effective.” Hamill, 262 P.3d at 953.

We conclude the Release satisfies both the Jones test and the voluntary and informed requirement of Section 13-22-107 and is, therefore, enforceable.

II. Fraudulent Inducement

Plaintiff argues in the alternative that even if the Release is [**27] enforceable, it should nevertheless be set aside because it was procured through fraud.2 HN8Go to this Headnote in the case.“A release is an agreement to which the general contract rules of interpretation and construction apply. Like any contract, a release procured through fraud can be set aside.” Chase v. Dow Chem. Co., 875 F.2d 278, 281 (10th Cir. 1989) (internal quotation marks and citation omitted). To establish fraud, a plaintiff must prove

(1) a fraudulent misrepresentation of material fact was made by the defendant; (2) at the time the representation was made, the defendant knew the representation was false or was aware that he did not know whether the representation was true or false; (3) the plaintiff relied on the misrepresentation; (4) the plaintiff had the right to rely on, or was justified in relying on, the misrepresentation; and (5) the reliance resulted in damages.

Barfield v. Hall Realty, Inc., 232 P.3d 286, 290 (Colo. App. 2010). Furthermore, “[t]he misrepresentation must be made with the intent to deceive.” Club Valencia Homeowners Ass’n, Inc. v. Valencia Assocs., 712 P.2d 1024, 1026 (Colo. App. 1985).

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – Footnotes – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

2 Plaintiff first alluded to this argument in the hearing on Defendant’s motion for summary judgment. [**28] The magistrate judge then allowed supplemental briefing on the issue. In its response to Plaintiff’s supplemental brief, Defendant argued Plaintiff’s late reliance on the fraud defense “is neither proper nor excusable.” (App. at 378.) In its order, the magistrate judge considered Plaintiff’s fraud defense without discussing its timeliness or procedural propriety. Defendant has not argued on appeal that the magistrate judge erred in considering Plaintiff’s argument. We therefore have no occasion to address whether Plaintiff’s belated fraud defense was properly considered in the first instance.

– – – – – – – – – – – – End Footnotes- – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Plaintiff contends the Letter, which accompanied the Release, contained three fraudulent misrepresentations: (1) “All of [Defendant’s] activities are conducted in a manner consistent with the highest standards, as defined by the Association for Experiential Education (AEE)”; (2) “The BOEC is accredited by AEE”; and (3) AEE “independently reviews the policies, practices and educational components of applicant organizations and accredits those that meet their high standards.” (App. at 209.) However, Plaintiff has offered no evidence that statements two and three were false; that is, Plaintiff has [**29] pointed to no evidence that Defendant, generally, was not accredited by AEE or that AEE does not perform the functions described in statement three. Plaintiff’s argument then, hinges on the allegedly fraudulent misrepresentation in the first statement.

Plaintiff maintains the first statement constitutes a fraudulent misrepresentation because AEE does not have standards for [*879] adaptive skiing, and Defendant’s adaptive ski program is therefore at least one activity that is not “conducted in a manner consistent with the highest standards, as defined by [AEE].” (Id.) Accepting, without deciding, that this statement constitutes a fraudulent material misrepresentation, Plaintiff has failed to provide any evidence that Mrs. Squires relied on this misrepresentation in deciding to sign the Release. Plaintiff points to no evidence that Mrs. Squires relied on the representation that Defendant’s adaptive ski program was conducted in a manner consistent with AEE standards. Rather, she relies on her mother’s statements that she “believed that BOEC was an accredited program” (App. at 354), and “that they had an [sic] accredited certified instructors that would manage a safe program” (App. at 357). (See [**30] also App. at 353 (“[T]hey were, you know, accredited and certified and they’d been doing it for a number of years.”), 356 (“That she would be with certified accredited people in a safe program that they could supervise appropriately.”).) These statements, even when viewed in the light most favorable to Plaintiff, do not support her position that Mrs. Squires relied on the representation that Defendant’s adaptive ski program was conducted in a manner consistent with AEE’s standards.3 Notably, Mrs. Squires made no mention of AEE or its standards when discussing her beliefs about Defendant’s program. Because Plaintiff has failed to provide any evidence that Mrs. Squires relied on a material misrepresentation made by Defendant in the Letter, the magistrate judge properly concluded Plaintiff failed to establish Mrs. Squires was fraudulently induced to sign the Release.

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – Footnotes – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

3 While Mrs. Squires’s testimony may suggest she believed that Defendant’s adaptive ski program was accredited by AEE, the Letter made no such representation. Rather, this purported representation was inferred by Mrs. Squires from the three statements listed above in connection with the representation that “all courses are [**31] tailored to the specific goals and abilities of [the] students, all activities offered are designed to pose appropriate challenges for students, and the BOEC maintains rigorous standards.” (Appellant’s Opening Br. at 31 (internal quotation marks and brackets omitted).) Mrs. Squires’s misunderstanding of Defendant’s Letter does not excuse her from the consequences of signing the Release. See Shoels v. Klebold, 375 F.3d 1054, 1070 (10th Cir. 2004) (“Misunderstanding, not misrepresentation, was the basis for Appellants’ acceptance, and so they cannot evade the normal limitations on relief from the consequences of their mistake.”).

– – – – – – – – – – – – End Footnotes- – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Conclusion

For the foregoing reasons, we AFFIRM the magistrate judge’s order granting summary judgment to Defendant on Plaintiff’s negligence claim.

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Colorado Department of Transportation looking to hire a Bicycle/Pedestrian Specialized Analyst

You’ll be dodging big trucks but making a difference!

Colorado Department of Transportation

Colorado Department of Transportation (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Class Title: GENERAL PROFESSIONAL IV

Type of Announcement: This position is open only to Colorado state residents.

Closing Date/Time: Wed. 06/26/13 11:59 PM Mountain Time

Primary Physical Work Address: 4201 East Arkansas Ave., Denver, CO 80222

Salary: $4,733.00 – $6,828.00 Monthly

FLSA Status: Exempt; position is not eligible for overtime compensation.

Job Type: Full Time

Location: Denver Metro, Colorado

How To Apply: Thank you for your interest. Submit an on-line application by clicking the link below or submit a State of Colorado Application for Announced Vacancy and all supplemental questions according to the instructions provided below. Failure to submit a complete and timely application may result in the rejection of your application. Applicants are responsible for ensuring that application materials are received by the appropriate Human Resources office before the closing date and time listed above.

If not applying on-line, submit application to: CDOT Workforce Staffing Attn: Erin Hardin, 4201 E. Arkansas Ave. Suite 290, Denver, CO 80222

Department Contact Information: Erin Hardin, 303.757.9797, erin.hardin@state.co.us

Methods of Appointment: Appointment to the vacancy or vacancies represented by this announcement is expected to be from the eligible list created. However, at the discretion of the appointing authority, the position(s) may be filled by another method of appointment for a valid articulated business reason.

Transcripts Required: An unofficial copy of transcripts must be submitted at the time of application. Transcripts from colleges or universities outside the United States must be assessed for U.S. equivalency by a NACES educational credential evaluation service. This documentation is the responsibility of the applicant and must be included as part of your application materials. Failure to provide a transcript or credential evaluation report may result in your application being rejected and you will not be able to continue in the selection process for this announcement.

For more information and to apply go to: http://rec-law.us/12HqwTG

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By Recreation Law Rec-law@recreation-law.com James H. Moss #Authorrank

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#RecreationLaw, #@RecreationLaw, #Cycling.Law #Fitness.Law, #Ski.Law, #Outside.Law, #Recreation.Law, #Recreation-Law.com, #Outdoor Law, #Recreation Law, #Outdoor Recreation Law, #Adventure Travel Law, #law, #Travel Law, #Jim Moss, #James H. Moss, #Attorney at Law, #Tourism, #Adventure Tourism, #Rec-Law, #Rec-Law Blog, #Recreation Law, #Recreation Law Blog, #Risk Management, #Human Powered, #Human Powered Recreation,# Cycling Law, #Bicycling Law, #Fitness Law, #Recreation-Law.com, #Backpacking, #Hiking, #Mountaineering, #Ice Climbing, #Rock Climbing, #Ropes Course, #Challenge Course, #Summer Camp, #Camps, #Youth Camps, #Skiing, #Ski Areas, #Negligence, #Snowboarding, #RecreationLaw, #@RecreationLaw, #Cycling.Law #Fitness.Law, #SkiLaw, #Outside.Law, #Recreation.Law, #RecreationLaw.com, #OutdoorLaw, #RecreationLaw, #OutdoorRecreationLaw, #AdventureTravelLaw, #Law, #TravelLaw, #JimMoss, #JamesHMoss, #AttorneyatLaw, #Tourism, #AdventureTourism, #RecLaw, #RecLawBlog, #RecreationLawBlog, #RiskManagement, #HumanPowered, #HumanPoweredRecreation,# CyclingLaw, #BicyclingLaw, #FitnessLaw, #RecreationLaw.com, #Backpacking, #Hiking, #Mountaineering, #IceClimbing, #RockClimbing, #RopesCourse, #ChallengeCourse, #SummerCamp, #Camps, #YouthCamps, #Skiing, #Ski Areas, #Negligence, #Snowboarding, sport and recreation laws, ski law, cycling law, Colorado law, law for recreation and sport managers, bicycling and the law, cycling and the law, ski helmet law, skiers code, skiing accidents, Recreation Lawyer, Ski Lawyer, Paddlesports Lawyer, Cycling Lawyer, Recreational Lawyer, Fitness Lawyer, Rec Lawyer, Challenge Course Lawyer, Ropes Course Lawyer, Zip Line Lawyer, Rock Climbing Lawyer, Adventure Travel Lawyer, Outside Lawyer, Recreation Lawyer, Ski Lawyer, Paddlesports Lawyer, Cycling Lawyer, #RecreationalLawyer, #FitnessLawyer, #RecLawyer, #ChallengeCourseLawyer, #RopesCourseLawyer, #ZipLineLawyer, #RockClimbingLawyer, #AdventureTravelLawyer, #OutsideLawyer, CDOT, Colorado, Department of Transportation, Colorado Department of Transportation, Bicycling, Cycling, Pedistrian,

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BikeDenver Looking for an Executive Director

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Denver Bike Sharing
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Denver Bike Sharing
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Job Opening: BikeDenver Executive Director
BikeDenver, the city’s bike advocacy group, is searching for a passionate and qualified individual to lead them into their next level of success. Among their many accomplishments, BikeDenver lead the recent charge to get a protected bike lane on 15th avenue. The vitality, activism, and enthusiasm of the organization is critical to Denver’s growth as a bike friendly city. Please click the BikeDenver logo link below to be taken to the position’s description:
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news-blue-bracket-l.gif What Can You Do?If you are passionate about Denver and the people who bike here, please read over the qualifications and either apply or spread the word about this important position.

The Job Posting Expires April 26th

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Denver Bike Sharing

Sawyer Day Crew Leader Position Description 2013 Summer Season

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 Sawyer Day Crew Leader Position Description 2013 Summer Season

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Mile High Youth Corps is a regional, non-profit, AmeriCorps (http://www.americorps.gov) affiliated organization that engages youth in jobs that help the planet and provide pathways to a promising future. Corpsmembers work on conservation and environmental stewardship projects throughout the Denver metro area while engaging in meaningful education activities.

Position Description:

The Mile High Youth Corps Crew Leader positions require individuals who are skilled problem-solvers, experienced leaders and positive role models. A crew is comprised of ten Corpsmembers (18-24 years old) all working together to complete conservation work projects on public lands and in communities. Crew Leaders manage a demanding work schedule and are responsible for creating a valuable experience for the Corpsmembers. Crew Leaders are responsible for ensuring the facilitation of environmental education, healthy lifestyle, job readiness training, leadership development, civic engagement, independent living and positive group living skills to their crew. Crew Leaders must possess a strong work ethic, promote high quality work performance in their crew, and have a desire to devote themselves to field-based work and youth development for an entire summer. The position requires both supervisory and technical aptitude, in addition to a high level of comfort in the outdoors.

Crew Leader Duties and Responsibilities: Supervision and Management

 

               Provides daily supervision of the members of his/her crew, including assigning, leading and instructing work tasks and training Corpsmembers in the development of job skills.

               Monitors, manages, and promote crew’s physical and emotional safety on and off the work site.

               Teaches Corpsmembers a variety of work skills in conjunction with technical assistance providers.

               Maintains and promotes positive group morale.

               Enforces the code of conduct, discipline policies and program procedures outlined in the employee handbooks at all times.

               Provides consistent, ongoing informal feedback, as well as performs a minimum of one formal evaluation per Corpsmember each season.

               Acts as a positive role model to all Corpsmembers and promotes a positive corps culture.

               Responsible for on-site risk management of the crew and work site.

 

Work Project Implementation

               Assists MHYC staff with the set-up of work projects including the estimation of time and materials needed for work projects.

               Proactively assesses, identifies, and mitigates safety related hazards on the job site.

               Trains Corpsmembers in and maintains a safe work environment.

               Oversees and implements a variety of conservation, service learning and community service projects for his/her team.

               Distributes work among Corpsmembers and maintains even work flow.

               Serves as a liaison and on-site contact with project sponsors.

               Ensures timely, accurate, and quality completion of work projects.

               Completes all project completion reports and project evaluations in a timely manner.

 

Corpsmember Development and Education

               Promotes individual learning, leadership and personal growth among Corpsmembers.

               Collaborates with the AmeriCorps Leadership and Conservation Corpsmembers in developing and implementing educational components for projects.

               Plans and facilitates field trips, community meetings, and team-building activities at work site.

               May be required to participate in Colorado Cares Day, July 29th, 2013.

               Ensures consistent leadership development and service learning opportunities are integrated into trainings.

               Implements and monitors Corpsmembers participation and progress in life skills and job readiness training programs at work site.

               Provides consistent feedback and support to AmeriCorps Leadership and Conservation Corpsmembers on their leadership roles.

 

Administrative Duties

               Supports Corpmembers post-program placement.

               Monitors, documents, and evaluates the participant progress in the program using individual written evaluations, case notes, and 1:1 meetings.

               Maintains thorough and complete records on each of his/her Corpsmembers throughout the length of the program, including timesheets, rosters and daily accountability forms.

               Maintains complete and accurate files, including project data and records, and employment paperwork for each of his/her Corpsmembers.

               Assists other staff with the reporting required for funders and board members.

               Ensures project photographs and required data are collected for seasonal projects.

               Ensures timely completion of Corpsmember awards, incentives and recognitions.

               Other duties as assigned.

               High School diploma or GED required. At least two years of college or vocational training is preferred. Significant professional experience may be substituted for post-secondary education.

               At least one year experience of working with a diverse population of youth and staff in a team atmosphere.

               Advanced experience and skills in conservation, construction, or landscaping preferred.

               Must attend Wilderness First Aid training class. Crew Leader is responsible of one-half of the cost of this training through payroll deductions. Full or partial scholarships may be available to help defer the Crew Leader cost for this training.

               Communication Skills: ability to motivate and discipline others, organize and direct a crew of young people on work projects, communicate effectively with a diverse group of young people, co-workers and supervisors and explain and demonstrate safe work practices.

               Keep accurate records; perform case management, evaluations, and prepare reports.

               Previous Conservation or Youth Corps experience preferred.

               Chainsaw experience highly preferred

               Must be able to lift 75 lbs., spend 8-10 hours a day in the sun and hike 5 miles with a day-pack.

               Ability to use hand and power tools.

               Wilderness First Responder or higher preferred.

               Valid driver’s license with insurable driving record and ability to drive a 12-passenger van to and from work sites.

               Ability to complete tasks in a detailed and timely manner.

               Ability to work independently.

               Pre-employment background check will be required. May be subject to FBI Background Check, which includes fingerprinting.

               Pre-employment drug screen required. May implement drug testing throughout employment.

               Must be able to legally work in the United States, which will be verified via the federal E-Verify program.

 

General Qualifications:

To Apply:

Email: Send resume and cover letter to christyg@mhyc.net (include position title in subject line) Fax: 303-433-5997 Mail: Send resume and cover letter to: Attn. Christy Gallese, 1801 Federal Blvd. Denver, CO 80204

Mile High Youth Corps Land Conservation Programs are Tobacco Free

Mile High Youth Corps is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Mile High Youth Corps is committed to the inclusion of members with all levels of ability. Reasonable accommodations are available upon request. This program is available to all, without regard to race, color, national origin, disability, age, sex, political affiliation, or, in most instances, religion

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Denver B-cycle Announces System Expansion from 53 to 83 Stations

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HeaderDenver B-cycle System Announces Expansion from 53 to 83 Stations; Fourth Season Starts Monday, March 18 With Three New Stations at Denver Zoo, Denver Museum of Nature and Science and Auraria Campus

Kaiser Permanente Continues as Founding Funder; Frontier Airlines Becomes “Official Airline” of Denver B-cycle

Denver B-cycle today announced that 30 new stations will be installed in the coming months, expanding its service to new neighborhoods beyond its current base and nearly doubling the square miles covered by the shared bicycle system. The Denver B-cycle fleet will grow to over 700.

Among the 30 new stations, three are already installed in high-visibility locations-The Denver Zoo, The Denver Museum of Nature and Science, and the Auraria Campus. All will be in service when the 2013 season opens on Monday, March 18.

Residents of the following neighborhoods will find one or more new stations near them: West Highland, Highland, Jefferson Park, Union Station, Five Points, North Capitol Hill, City Park West, City Park, Congress Park, Cheesman Park, Capitol Hill, Lincoln Park, Baker, Speer and Auraria. The new station locations have been selected specifically to complement high-use transit locations with most of them being located close to or within a mile of a bus or light rail stop.

“In just a few short years, the opening of Denver B-cycle’s season has become a rite of spring for the Mile High City-as welcome as the first tulip,” said Mayor Michael B. Hancock during a morning news conference at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science. “The expansion plans mean that the city is embracing this simple, sustainable and powerful concept and I applaud the many community partners and corporate sponsors who have come together to make this expansion possible. Riding a bike is better for our environment and better for our collective fitness and Denver B-cycle is playing a major role on both of these important issues.”

Mayor Hancock said Denver must remain a global leader as a bike-friendly city.

“As the Capitol of the least obese state in the nation, with more sunshine and a more navigable street network than any of our competitors, there is no reason why Denver can’t push to the top of national and global rankings for bike friendliness in the coming years,” said Mayor Hancock.

Partners & Sponsors

In addition to the expansion, Denver B-cycle announced the return of presenting sponsor Kaiser Permanente and a new, three-year commitment from Frontier Airlines, now the “official airline” of Denver B-cycle.

“We would not be where we are today, on the threshold of a major expansion and looking ahead to an exciting 2013 season, without the wide variety of community partners and businesses that recognize the importance of the shared bicycle network and the opportunity it represents to change the way we move around the city,” said Parry Burnap, executive director of Denver B-cycle. “We appreciate Kaiser Permanente, Frontier and all our sponsors and underwriters for their critical support.”

The Denver B-cycle program has grown by leaps and bounds and it’s exciting to see so many residents and visitors traveling around our beautiful city by bicycle, ” said Donna Lynne, DrPh, president of Kaiser Permanente Colorado. “We are proud to continue our support for this program as part of our commitment to improving community health.”

Frontier Airlines’ Daniel Shurz, senior vice president, commercial said the airline’s three-year commitment to Denver B-cycle is a natural fit. “We offer friendly baggage policies that encourage our passengers to bring their bicycles when they travel and we are committed to improving the quality of life in Denver on every level. We welcome the chance to be corporate partners with Denver B-cycle and believe the shared bicycle system is poised to grow for many years to come.”

Funding for New Stations

Twenty-seven of the new stations are possible because Denver Bike Sharing has been awarded capital funding through major two public grants matched by local foundations: Transportation, Community, and System Preservation Program (TCSP) awarded by the Federal Highway Administration, and Funding Advancements for Surface Transportation and Economic Recovery (FASTER) awarded by the Colorado Transportation Commission. Denver’s Anschutz Foundation and Gates Family Foundation provided the local match.

The two City Park stations were privately funded with donations from the Walton Family Foundation, the Piton Foundation, Encana, the Zoo and the Denver Museum of Nature and Science; the Auraria station was funded by the Auraria Campus Sustainable Campus Program.

About Denver Bike Sharing

Denver B-cycle is presented by Kaiser Permanente in association with a variety of community sponsors. Denver B-cycle is owned and operated by Denver Bike Sharing, a charitable, non-profit organization.

Denver Bike Sharing serves as a catalyst for a fundamental transformation in thinking and behavior by operating a bike sharing system in Denver to enhance mobility while promoting all aspects of sustainability: quality of life, equity, the environment, economic development, and public health.

To learn more about Denver Bike Sharing, the owner and operator of Denver B-cycle, visit denver.bcycle.com or call 303-825-3325.