Celebrate National Public Lands Day with Free Admission and Special Events at National Parks

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National Park Service

U.S. Department of the Interior

Celebrate National Public Lands Day with Free Admission and Special Events at National Parks

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On September 22, join in the nation’s biggest celebration of the great outdoors on National Public Lands Day! All national parks will have free admission and many will host volunteer service projects open to all.

“Every year, Americans come together on National Public Lands Day to demonstrate their love of national parks,” said National Park Service Deputy Director P. Daniel Smith. “Activities hosted by parks across the nation will promote environmental stewardship and encourage the use of public lands for education, recreation, and good health.”

Marking its 25th anniversary this year, National Public Lands Day is the nation’s largest single-day environmental volunteer effort. More than 200,000 people are expected to participate in volunteer service events designed to improve the health of public lands and encourage shared stewardship.

Secretary of the Interior Ryan K. Zinke will celebrate the day by working alongside groups of military veterans and youth to paint several historic structures at Grand Canyon National Park. The volunteer project to restore the cabins is an example of the $11.6 billion in deferred maintenance needs in the National Park System. Secretary Zinke will also meet with national park partners and congressional representatives to discuss legislative efforts to address the maintenance backlog.

Grand Canyon is just one of 100 national parks and 2,600 federal public land sites hosting National Public Lands Day events. In other national parks, volunteers will rehabilitate campgrounds, improve trails, restore native habitats, repair bluebird boxes, clean beaches, and refurbish historic buildings, among other projects. Check NPS.gov for more information and a list of sites.

Volunteer efforts on days such as National Public Lands Day demonstrate the willingness of people to give back to the land for the benefit of parks. Volunteers assisting on work projects on National Public Lands Day will receive a voucher that can be redeemed for free entrance to any national park on a date of their choosing.

National Public Land Day celebrations also include recreational and educational activities, such as hikes, bike rides, paddle trips, bird watching excursions, and water quality testing. To encourage everyone to join the fun, it is an entrance fee-free day for national parks and most other federal public lands and state parks.

The National Environmental Education Foundation coordinates National Public Lands Day in partnership with seven federal agencies as well as nonprofit organizations and state, regional, and local governments. The federal partners are the National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management, Department of Defense, Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the U.S. Forest Service.

All National Public Lands Day events are free, and open to people of all ages and abilities. To learn more, register an event, or find an event near you, visit NEEFusa.org/NPLD. Follow National Public Lands Day on Twitter and Facebook for updates and share your own activities that day with #NPLD.

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Free Days for US National Parks for 2017: Get out and Get There!

 

 

National Park Service
U.S. Department of the Interior

National Park Service News Release

Release Date: November 14, 2017
Contact: Kathy Kupper,
kathy_kupper@nps.gov, 202-208-6843

National Park Service Announces Fee Free Days for 2017 

Ten More Great Reasons to Visit a National Park

WASHINGTON – Combine great scenery and history with great savings and visit a national park for free on one of 10 fee free days in 2017.

The ten entrance fee-free days for 2017 will be:

  • January 16: Martin Luther King Jr. Day
  • February 20: Presidents Day
  • April 15-16 & April 22-23: National Park Week Weekends
  • August 25: National Park Service Birthday
  • September 30: National Public Lands Day
  • November 11-12: Veterans Day Weekend

“National parks are known for their priceless beauty,” said National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis. “They are a bargain anytime but on these ten days in 2017, they really will be priceless. We want everyone to visit their national parks and the fee free days provide extra incentive to experience these amazing places.”

During the fee free days, all National Park Service sites will waive their entrance fees for all visitors. Usually, 124 of the 413 national parks charge entrance fees that range from $3 to $30. The other 289 sites do not have entrance fees. The entrance fee waiver for the fee-free days does not cover amenity or user fees for things such as camping, boat launches, transportation, or special tours.

To continue the national park adventure beyond these fee free days, the annual $80 America the Beautiful National Parks and Federal Recreation Lands Pass allows unlimited entrance to more than 2,000 federal recreation areas, including all national parks,. There are also free or discounted passes available for senior citizens, current military members, fourth grade students, and disabled citizens.

The National Park System includes more than 84 million acres and is comprised of 413 sites including national parks, national historical parks, national monuments, national recreation areas, national battlefields, and national seashores. There is at least one national park in every state.

Last year, 307 million people visited a national park. They spent $16.9 billion which supported 295,000 jobs and had a $32 billion impact on the U.S. economy.

In addition to national parks, the National Park Service works with tribes, local governments, and partners across the country to help preserve local history and create close-to-home recreational opportunities. Programs such as the National Register of Historic Places, National Heritage Areas, National Wild and Scenic Rivers, and the Rivers, Trails, Conservation Assistance Program revitalize communities, celebrate local heritage, and provide places for people to get outside, be active, and have fun.

www.nps.gov


2017 Pathways Conference presented by Colorado State University, US Fish & Wildlife Service and Rocky Mountain National Park

Pathways Conference 2017

https://pathways2017.exordo.com

Join us for the Pathways 2017 conference hosted by Colorado State University, in partnership with the US Fish and Wildlife Service in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado!

Abstract due date: April 24, 2017 (Call for abstracts Dec. 1)

Theme: Futures

 

Website: www.HDFWConference.org  

 

Mark your Calendar: September 17 – 20, 2017

Location: This year we return to the YMCA of the Rockies, Estes Park/Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado. Nestled in the outskirts of the beautiful town of Estes Park, the YMCA of the Rockies is surrounded by Rocky Mountain National Park on three sides. This venue provides a fantastic setting with abundant wildlife viewing opportunities at your doorstep.


National Park Visitors Contributing $32 Billion to Economy

1874651408709286668.png National Park Service
U.S. Department of the Interior
National Park Visitor Spending Contributes $32 Billion to Economy

Every public dollar invested in National Park Service returns $10

WASHINGTON – Spending by a record number of national park visitors in 2015 provided a $32 billion benefit to the nation’s economy and supported 295,000 jobs, according to a report released today by National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis.

“The big picture of national parks and their importance to the economy is clear,” Jarvis said of the $16.9 billion visitors spent in communities within 60 miles of a national park. “Each tax dollar invested in the National Park Service effectively returns $10 to the U.S. economy because of visitor spending that works through local, state and the U.S. economy.

“This is especially significant news to the gateway communities where national parks can be the community’s primary economic engine,” Jarvis said. “While we care for the parks and interpret the stories of these iconic natural, cultural and historic landscapes, our neighbors in nearby communities provide our visitors with important services like food and lodging and that means hundreds of thousands of local jobs.”

The report comes on the heels of a major policy speech delivered by U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell earlier this week. The Secretary called for greater investments in national parks and public lands to prepare for the next century of conservation. The address, delivered during National Park Week, also called for a course correction in conserving America’s public lands; made an argument to make our national parks more relevant to an increasingly diverse and urbanized country; and called for implementing smarter, landscape-level planning to support healthy ecosystems and sustainable development on public lands.

Visitor spending in 2015 supported 295,000 jobs, provided $11.1 billion in labor income, $18.4 billion in value added, and $32.0 billion in economic output to the U.S. economy. The lodging sector provided the highest direct contributions with $5.2 billion in economic output to local gateway economies and 52,000 jobs. The restaurants and bars sector provided the next greatest direct contributions with $3.4 billion in economic output to local gateway economies and 65,000 jobs.

According to the 2015 report, most park visitor spending was for lodging (31.1 percent) followed by food and beverages (20.2 percent), gas and oil (11.8 percent), admissions and fees (10.2 percent) and souvenirs and other expenses (9.8 percent).

The annual peer-reviewed economics report, 2015 National Park Visitor Spending Effects, was prepared by economists Catherine Cullinane Thomas of the U.S. Geological Survey and Lynne Koontz of the National Park Service. It includes information by park and by state on visitor spending, the number of jobs supported by visitor spending and other statistics.

Report authors this year also produced an interactive tool to present data in full color circle and bar graphs . Users can explore visitor spending, jobs, labor income, value added, and output effects by sector for national, state, and local economies. Users can also view year-by-year trend data. The interactive tool and report are available at the NPS Social Science Program webpage: go.nps.gov/vse.

National Park visitation is expected to grow again in 2016, the centennial year for the NPS. There are now 411 parks in the national park system, the latest is the Belmont-Paul Women’s Equality National Monument in Washington D.C., established by President Obama on April 12.

President Obama established a Centennial Initiative for the NPS anniversary and Congress is considering a centennial act to support a multi-year effort to invest wisely in the park system’s most important assets, use parks to enhance informal learning, engage volunteers, provide training opportunities for youth, and enhance the NPS’s ability to leverage partnerships to accomplish its mission.

For more state-by-state information about national parks and how the National Park Service is working with communities, go to http://www.nps.gov/[statename], for example: http://www.nps.gov/virginia.

National Park Visitor Spending Contributions to the U.S. Economy 2012-15

Visitation Visitor Spending Jobs Supported Local Jobs Total Output
2012 282,765,682 $14.7 billion 242,712 201,040 $26.8 billion
2013 273,630,895 $14.6 billion 237,599 197,343 $26.5 billion
2014 292,800,082 $15.7 billion 276,960 235,600 $29.7 billion
2015 307,247,252 $16.9 billion 295,339 252,030 $32 billion

Admission and Festivities for All during National Park Week April 16-24 at all National Parks

1874651366257968200.png National Park Service
U.S. Department of the Interior
1849 C Street, NW
Washington, DC 20240
202-208-6843
www.nps.gov
National Park Foundation
1201 Eye Street, NW
Washington, DC 20005
202-354-6460
www.nationalparks.org
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Free Admission and Festivities for All during National Park Week April 16-24

All Americans Encouraged to #FindYourPark and Celebrate the NPS Centennial

Washington, D.C. (March 23, 2016) As the National Park Service (NPS) celebrates 100 years of protecting and preserving the nation’s parks and monuments, all Americans are encouraged to get out and #FindYourPark during National Park Week, April 16 through 24. All National Park Service entrance fees will be waived for the week so choose a park, near or far, and discover what makes it unique.

Each of the 410 national parks is a thread in the tapestry that tells the story of our country – its beautiful landscapes, diverse culture, and rich heritage. Throughout the year, and especially during National Park Week, the NPS and the National Park Foundation, invite everyone to discover and share their own unique connections to our public lands.

“We have an amazing variety of special events taking place during the centennial,” said National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis. “Some commemorate our first hundred years, but many others look to the future, to the next 100 years, and will help connect with and create the next generation of park visitors, supporters and advocates. It is through them that America’s lands and stories will be preserved and passed on to future generations.”

“With free admission to parks all week long, National Park Week is the perfect opportunity to check out a new location, revisit one of your favorite parks, and perhaps invite a friend who has never visited a park before to join you,” said Will Shafroth, president of the National Park Foundation, the official charity of America’s national parks. “It’s a great time to experience and celebrate our parks and historic places, and discover and share with each other how these treasured places are vital and relevant to people from all backgrounds from all over the country.”

National Park Week will kick off with National Junior Ranger Day on Saturday, April 16. Parks will host kid oriented activities and distribute the new Centennial Junior Ranger booklet and badge. Throughout the week, many parks will also host Every Kid in a Park events, which encourage fourth grade students to visit national parks and other public lands by offering a free annual pass.

Other highlights during the week include an education summit on April 20, Earth Day events on April 22, a national park InstaMeet on April 23, and Park RxDay on April 24. Park Rx is a community health initiative where medical doctors “prescribe” time in parks to promote wellness and help prevent and treat chronic disease. More than a dozen national parks will offer health screenings and recreational activities, including an event with the U.S. Surgeon General.

Visit www.FindYourPark.com to learn more about National Park Week activities throughout the country.

Find Your Park/Encuentra Tu Parque is a public awareness and education movement to inspire people from all backgrounds to connect with, celebrate, and support America’s national parks and community-based programs that help revitalize communities and commemorate local heritage.


National Park Service Offers $15 Million in Grants for Outdoor Recreation in Cities

1874651408709286668.png National Park Service
U.S. Department of the Interior
Office of Communications
1849 C Street NW
Washington, DC 20240
202-208-6843 phone
www.nps.gov
National Park Service News Release

National Park Service Offers $15 Million in Grants for Outdoor Recreation in Cities

WASHINGTON – National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis today opened the application period for $15 million of grants to develop outdoor recreation spaces in urban areas.

“We are excited to offer these competitive grants which will be matched with local partnerships to create safe outdoor recreation places for people, especially young people, in neighborhoods of America’s cities,” Jarvis said.

The National Park Services (NPS) Outdoor Recreation Legacy Partnership Program (ORLP) competitive grants are made available through the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) and are just the second round of such grants. The NPS obligated $2.9 million of the grants for pilot projects last year. Communities and partners matched that money with projects in eight cities worth a total of $6.1 million.

“I think Congress recognized the value of the projects and partnerships and they responded with a fivefold increase in project grant dollars this year,” Jarvis said. “We’re looking to build on the excitement generated by these pilot projects and grants to add many more projects across the country.”

The NPS will entertain project proposals ranging from $250,000 to $750,000 each, and planning grants up to $75,000. Projects must have matching funds and partners. Outside of the planning grants, funding for eligible projects can be used to acquire and/or develop land to create new, or reinvigorate existing, public parks and other outdoor recreation spaces in neighborhoods that are underserved or lack such opportunities.

Jarvis also announced a pilot planning grant program mini-competition, which will fund special studies to help guide park and recreation investment to where it is needed most in urbanized areas.

The ORLP grants complement the existing NPS LWCF State and Local Assistance Program in targeting national priorities to create new opportunities for outdoor play as well as development or enhancement of outdoor recreation partnerships in cities. Selected projects will showcase how partners at all levels can work collaboratively to leverage investment and support close-to-home recreation opportunities that will connect youth to public lands.

Since its establishment in 1964, the Land and Water Conservation Fund has conserved land in every state and supported tens of thousands of state and local projects. The fund does not use taxpayer dollars; the primary source of income derives from fees paid by oil and gas companies drilling offshore in waters owned by the American people. President Obama proposed full funding for the Land and Water Conservation Fund in the Fiscal Year 2017 budget, and is pursuing permanent authorization in annual mandatory funding for the Fund’s programs beginning in 2018.

Who may apply?

State and local government agencies (e.g., cities, counties, legal subdivisions such as park districts, etc.) and federally-recognized Indian tribes within or serving areas delineated by the Census Bureau from the 2010 census as having populations of 50,000 or more people and consisting of densely settled territory.

How do I apply?

Proposals should be developed in cooperation with the lead agency for LWCF in each state. The full funding opportunity announcement and pre-application materials are available online at grants.gov. Please look for Funding Opportunity Number P16AS00065; Title: Land and Water Conservation Fund Outdoor Recreation Legacy Partnership Program.

When is the deadline for applications?

Applications are due on Friday, May 20, 2016.


307 Million People visited US National Parks in 2015

1874651408709286668.png National Park Service
U.S. Department of the Interior
Office of Communications
1849 C Street NW
Washington, DC 20240
202-208-6843 phone
www.nps.gov
National Park Service News Release
National Park Service Certifies 2015 Visitation at 307 Million

Reports Annual Top 10 Lists and Other Highlights

WASHINGTON – President Theodore Roosevelt was reelected in 1904, the same year rangers started counting national park visitors. There were more than 120,000 visits to America’s 11 national parks in the first year of counting. This week, the National Park Service (NPS) certified 2015 national park visitation at more than 307 million. It also released its popular Top 10 list of the most visited national park sites.

“The popularity of national parks is well known, but last year’s numbers really are extraordinary,” said National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis. “As the National Park Service celebrates its 100th year, we’re preparing to welcome more visitors than ever including a new generation of park supporters and advocates who are discovering their own national park adventures.”

Today’s figures were an increase from the unofficial visitation total of 305 million reported by the NPS in January. The difference is attributed to the recently-completed NPS visitation audit.

2015 visitation highlights include:

  • 307,247,252 recreation visits, a 4.9 percent increase over 2014 and the previous record of 292.8 million recreation visits.
  • 371 of the 410 parks in the National Park System report visitation.
  • 57 of the 371 reporting parks set a new record for annual recreation visits. Eleven parks had more than 5 million recreation visits in 2015.

Notable park milestones in 2015

  • Joshua Tree National Park surpassed 2 million annual recreation visits for the first time.
  • Rocky Mountain National Park surpassed 4 million annual recreation visits for the first time.
  • Yellowstone National Park surpassed 4 million annual recreation visits for the first time.
  • Grand Canyon National Park surpassed 5 million annual recreation visits for the first time.
  • Glacier National Park surpassed 100 million total recreation visits (1910 to 2015)
  • 2 parks are reporting visitation for the first time
  • Charles Young Buffalo Soldiers National Monument
  • Waco Mammoth National Monument

Overnight stays in park campgrounds and backcountry were up over 2014.

Total overnight stays (sum of all categories) were up 6 percent over 2014.

Highlights:

  • Concessioner campground overnights were up 12.5 percent.
  • NPS campground tent overnights were up 13 percent.
  • NPS campground RV overnights were up 10 percent.
  • Backcountry overnights were up 7 percent.

Top 10 Visitation

All Parks of the National Park System

  1. Blue Ridge Parkway – 15,054,603
  2. Golden Gate National Recreation Area – 14,888,537
  3. Great Smoky Mountains National Park – 10,712,674
  4. Lincoln Memorial – 7,941,771
  5. Lake Mead National Recreation Area – 7,298,465
  6. George Washington Memorial Parkway – 7,286,463
  7. Gateway National Recreation Area – 6,392,565
  8. Natchez Trace Parkway – 5,785,812
  9. Vietnam Veterans Memorial – 5,597,077
  10. Grand Canyon National Park – 5,520,736

National Parks

  1. Great Smoky Mountains National Park – 10,712,674
  2. Grand Canyon National Park – 5,520,736
  3. Rocky Mountain National Park – 4,155,916
  4. Yosemite National Park – 4,150,217
  5. Yellowstone National Park – 4,097,710
  6. Zion National Park – 3,648,846
  7. Olympic National Park – 3,263,761
  8. Grand Teton National Park – 3,149,921
  9. Acadia National Park – 2,811,184
  10. Glacier National Park – 2,366,056

National Parks maintenance backlog reaches $11.9 Billion Dollars

1874651408709286668.png National Park Service
U.S. Department of the Interior
Office of Communications
1849 C Street NW
Washington, DC 20240
202-208-6843 phone
www.nps.gov
National Park Service News Release
Release Date: February 5, 2016

Contact: Jeffrey Olson, Jeffrey_olson 202-208-6843

National Parks maintenance backlog reaches $11.9 billion

WASHINGTON – The National Park Service (NPS) this week released its Fiscal Year 2015 deferred maintenance statistics for national parks. The $11.93 billion nationwide total is a $440 million increase from the previous year.

Deferred maintenance is necessary work – performed on infrastructure, such as roads and bridges, visitor centers, trails and campgrounds – that has been delayed for more than one year. Aging facilities, increasing use of park facilities and scarce resources contribute to the growing backlog.

“While Congress provided increases this year, the annual bill for maintenance in America’s national parks is still almost twice as much as is appropriated,” said National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis.

Congressional funding for the National Park Service in 2016 includes an additional $90 million for non-transportation maintenance. Congress also passed a new highway bill which will provide a $28 million increase for transportation projects in parks this year. Funding for transportation-related maintenance and construction will continue to rise, by $8 million per year for five years, until it reaches $300 million per year in 2020.

Nearly every unit in the National Park System has maintenance items that have been deferred. Regions regularly evaluate and prioritize project submissions to ensure available dollars make a difference, and will be using the new funds to address the highest priorities. For details about deferred maintenance at a particular national park, visit go.nps.gov/deferredmaint and click on the “NPS Asset Inventory Summary by Park” report.

Even though more maintenance items had to be deferred in 2015, these increases from Congress are welcome. Jarvis said they are part of a multifaceted approach to end the growth of deferred maintenance and eventually have enough resources to keep pace with annual maintenance responsibilities.

“We have a lot yet to do but I think everything is moving in the right direction,” Jarvis said of the deferred maintenance issue. “Congress has pitched in with base funding and with additional funds for the Centennial Challenge – a program that enables us to leverage private and non-profit partner contributions to complete important projects that improve visitor services in parks. There is more Congress can do through the Centennial Act now under consideration including short-term mandatory appropriations.”

www.nps.gov


America’s National Parks Received a New Record with the Number of Visitors attending 2015

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America’s National Parks: Record Number of Visitors in 2015

WASHINGTON – WASHINGTON – More than 305 million people visited national parks in 2015, eclipsing the all-time visitation record that the National Park Service saw in the previous year. The unofficial visitation numbers for 2015 were announced by National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis, as the National Park Service (NPS) is celebrating its centennial year.

“The increasing popularity of our national parks comes as we are actively reaching out to new audiences and inviting them to explore the depth and breadth of the national park system,” Jarvis said. “The 409 parks we care for preserve natural, cultural and historic landscapes across 84 million acres in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and U.S. Territories, and they tell stories that reflect the great diversity of our nation.”

Record visitation tests the capacity of the park system and challenges parks to continue to provide great experiences for all visitors. Jarvis said park managers are adjusting to make sure they have sufficient staff to provide interpretive programs, answer visitor questions, respond to emergencies and to keep restrooms, campgrounds and other facilities clean.

Park visitors can plan their trips to avoid peak crowds by visiting the most popular parks in spring and fall and by visiting early in the morning or later in the day. Visitors can also take advantage of shuttles and walking trails at some parks, including Yosemite and Glacier and Acadia national parks.

“Even with record breaking visitation, visitors can still find quiet places in the parks for those willing to seek them out,” Jarvis said. “I can take you to Yosemite Valley on the Fourth of July and within five minutes get you to a place where you are all alone.”

Much of the increase in national park visitation is the result of the National Park Foundation’s “Find Your Park” media campaign. The campaign has sparked interest from travelers and also from communities near national parks, state tourism agencies and Congress. In late December 2015, Congress approved a nine percent funding increase for the National Park Service, which will help the agency continue to provide excellent visitor services as visitation increases.

“The increase in Congressional appropriations comes at a critical time for the National Park Service and will help us to serve the growing number of visitors,” Jarvis said. “We look forward to continuing to work with Congress as it considers additional legislation in support of the National Park Service Centennial, which would further improve the national parks by encouraging philanthropy and volunteerism, while also allowing us to improve visitor services and connect with a new generation of national park visitors.”

By the Numbers: Unofficially, the NPS recorded more than 305 million visits during 2015. That is an increase of more than 12 million visits, and more than four percent, over the 2014 figure of 292.8 million visits. About 365 of 409 parks in the national park system record visitation numbers. The NPS has recorded more than 13 billion visits to parks since park managers began counting visitors in 1904, some 12 years before the NPS was created. Official statistics including the most-visited parks of the national park system and the most-visited national parks will be released in late February.

www.nps.gov


Adventure Cycling Association new Cycle Though Our National Parks Program on September 24

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Adventure Cycling Announces First-Ever Bike Your Park Day

Registration is now open for a national event on September 24, 2016, for people of all ages and abilities to discover their parks and public lands by bicycle.

MISSOULA, MONT., January 12, 2016 — Adventure Cycling Association today announced the inaugural Bike Your Park Day, which will inspire and empower thousands of people to bike in or to a national park, state park, wildlife refuge, or other public lands on the same day — September 24, 2016. Anyone interested in participating can now register and start planning their ride. Participants can register their own ride or join an existing ride posted on the Bike Your Park Day interactive map, which pinpoints all of the rides happening throughout the United States.

“Your park is only a pedal away on September 24th,” said Jim Sayer, executive director of Adventure Cycling Association. “You can ride one mile or 100 miles, you can go solo, ride with friends or bring the kids — it’s all about getting people to explore and discover the parks and public lands out their back door by bicycle.”

The event celebrates Adventure Cycling Association’s 40th anniversary and the National Park Service’s (NPS) Centennial, and is also on National Public Lands Day. Many parks will offer activities and volunteer opportunities, and many parks will waive entry fees.

“Bike Your Park Day is a great opportunity to promote healthy, active recreation in our parks while at the same time encouraging family-friendly activities during the NPS Centennial year,” said Bob Ratcliffe, NPS Program Chief of Conservation and Outdoor Recreation. “Plus, it’s a much better experience seeing our parks from the seat of a bicycle than sitting in a car!”

For those who are new to bicycling or unfamiliar with local routes, more than 100 Bike Your Park Day ambassadors are available in 47 states to answer questions about bicycling, safety, bike-friendly routes, and nearby parks and public lands. These ambassadors are volunteers who are eager to share their local and regional knowledge and offer ride recommendations.

“Bike Your Park Day is a national event that is building connections at the local level through the joy of bicycling,” Jim Sayer said. “In our 40 years as the top resource for bicycle travel, Adventure Cycling has seen time and again that there is no better way to connect with your neighbors and meet new people than on a bike. Bike Your Park Day will help spark those connections.”

Participants can share their rides on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and other social media using promotional materials on the Adventure Cycling website, including the Bike Your Park Day logo, sample social media posts and images, a downloadable poster, and sample press release and newsletter article.

Everyone who registers for Bike Your Park Day at adventurecycling.org/bikeyourpark before September 5th will be entered into a drawing to win a custom-painted Salsa Marrakesh touring bicycle and will receive a Bike Your Park Day sticker. The first 250 people to register will receive a Bike Your Park Day embroidered patch.

In addition to Bike Your Park Day, Adventure Cycling will celebrate its 40th anniversary with two other major events. National Bike Travel Weekend, June 3–5, encourages adventurers throughout North America to gather up their family and friends and bike to their favorite campground, B&B or hostel with thousands of others on the same weekend. Registration and DIY resources are available at adventurecycling.org/BikeTravelWeekend. The Montana Bicycle Celebration, July 15–17, will include parties, nationally acclaimed speakers, bike rides, music, art, film, and reunions in Missoula, Montana, Adventure Cycling’s headquarters. Tickets to the Friday reception and Saturday dinner are available at adventurecycling.org/MTBikeCelebration.

Major sponsors of the 40th Anniversary events include Raleigh Bicycles, Montana Department of Commerce, Salsa Cycles, Primal Wear, Advocate Cycles, Visit Mississippi, Travel Oregon, Osprey Packs, Experience Plus!, and Destination Missoula.

“Raleigh is honored to support Adventure Cycling’s 40th anniversary,” said Larry Pizzi, Raleigh’s senior vice president. “When we learned of the opportunity, we realized a perfect alignment with the association’s mission of inspiring and empowering people to travel by bicycle. At Raleigh, we believe that bicycling changes and improves people’s lives and we are pleased to be able to support an organization that helps create wonderful bicycling experiences and embraces the simple pleasures that riding a bicycle can bring.”

For more information about Adventure Cycling’s 40th anniversary visit http://www.adventurecycling.org/40th

Adventure Cycling Association inspires and empowers people to travel by bicycle. It is the largest cycling membership organization in North America with more than 48,000 members. Adventure Cycling produces cycling routes and maps for North America, organizes more than 100 tours and leadership courses annually, and publishes the Adventure Cyclist magazine. With 44,662 meticulously mapped miles in the Adventure Cycling Route Network, Adventure Cycling gives cyclists the tools and confidence to create their own bike travel adventures. Phone: 800-755-BIKE (2453). Web: www.adventurecycling.org.


Voting to not change the names of iconic Yosemite landmarks only supports the protagonist

We should have stopped this a decade ago, it’s too late now.

The facts are sort of simple understanding the law relating to the issue is confusing.

Delaware North was a concessionaire running the Yosemite National Park concession. Delaware North like a lot of concessionaires had to purchase the assets of the prior owner of the concession in 1993. That purchase included a lot of trademarks including the ones at issue here.

Allegedly the National Park Service decades ago required concessionaires to trademark the famous names in their concession. Anyone taking over a concession must purchase the assets of the prior concessionaire. This issue is determining the value of those assets which include the trademarks on the valuable names.

Anyone using a trademark must do so with the permission (that means pay money) of the owner of the trademark. If the NPS wants to use the name Ahwahnee then they must pay Delaware North money.

Delaware North lost the concession agreement with the National Park Service (NPS).

Delaware North has spent the time since the loss of the concession trying to get the NPS to determine a value of the assets to be sold to the new concessionaire. When the NPS would not agree to the values or arbitrate the issues Delaware North then sued the National Park Service for violation of its trademarks. Delaware North says the trademark is worth $51 million basically.

Congress cannot do anything. Congress cannot take away a legally obtained trademark. A trademark is a property right. It is something that is owned like land, a car, and your clothes. For congress to take away someone’s trademark would be like someone from the government coming and taking your car. They can’t unless you have committed a crime with your car. Here no crime has been committed that I have read about.

It is simple. Either we, the United States can pay Delaware North a lot of money to continue to use the names of the properties or we sue and lose and spend a lot of money on attorney fees and then pay Delaware North money. Probably the NPS (us) will be paying Delaware North into eternity if we sue. Delaware North would get a license fee every year, damages for prior use, interests, costs and attorney fees.

And if not Delaware North, then the next concessionaire and the next……

Congress cannot do anything. It is very rare for (Congress to do anything) take away someone’s ownership right absent a crime. So far no one has found a crime in this mess. On top of that I seriously doubt congress would do anything about it.

Your signature on Petitions, online comments etc., are ONLY helping Delaware North.

Every time there is another signature, comment etc., it just goes to prove the value of the trademark and increases the amount of money owed to Delaware North.

If you want to help solve the problem QUIT talking about this issue.

By changing the names to the landmarks the NPS might be able to reduce the value of the Trademarks to a reasonable value. Then the US can either buy the trademark names back (again will require an act of congress I think) or not worry about it.

Another alternative is for us to wait until the value drops and raise the money and buy the landmarks back ourselves.

Either way it is going to be a long and expensive process. There is nothing you or I can do about this now.

The irony of the issue is decades ago the NPS required the concessionaire to trademark the valuable names. Now the NPS is arguing the names can’t be trademarked because they have historical value.

This is a great article about the issues:

Yosemite Concessionaire has offered National Park Service free use of Yosemite trademark names during legal dispute

Another article that is worth reading:

Yosemite changes names of park sites as a result of trademark dispute

 

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Free day at Our National Parks on Matin Luther King Day! Get Outside

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Commemorate Martin Luther King, Jr. Day in a National Park

Free Admission and Special Events will Take Place Nationwide

WASHINGTON – On Monday, January 18, national parks throughout the country will commemorate Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. All national parks will provide free admission for all visitors and many parks will host special events or volunteer service projects.

“We invite all Americans to honor the legacy of Dr. King in a national park,” said National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis. “Attend a special event, take part in a volunteer project, or visit a site with a direct connection to this great leader. We are all encouraged to remember the values of service and commitment to community that Dr. King exemplified throughout his life. Let’s make this holiday truly a day on, not a day off.”

In addition to waiving entrance fees at all national parks, many parks will host programs or volunteer work projects. Following is a partial list, please visit www.nps.gov/findapark/mlk-jr-day.htm for more events and information.

  • Community Vegetable Garden Planting and Wellness Fair at Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve in Louisiana
  • Invasive Plant Species Removal, Drainage & Inlet Cleaning at Valley Forge National Historical Park in Pennsylvania
  • Anacostia River Clean-up with the Student Conservation Association at Anacostia Park in Washington, DC
  • Dr. Martin Luther King Film Series and Dialogue at George Washington Carver National Monument in Missouri
  • Tsunami Debris Clean-up, Habitat Restoration, and more at Golden Gate National Recreation Area in California

The additional entrance fee-free days for 2016 will be April 16 through 24, August 25 through 28, September 24, and November 11. Come to a national park and discover the sites and stories of our shared heritage.

www.nps.gov

About the National Park Service. More than 20,000 National Park Service employees care for America’s 409 national parks and work with communities across the nation to help preserve local history and create close-to-home recreational opportunities. Learn more at www.nps.gov.

Contact information: National Park Service , National Park Service-WINVALE, 290 Broadway Lbby 2, New York, NY 100071892i.gif&i=20160108203849.000000160fac%40mail6-05-pao.dyndns.com&x=MHw1NjA0Nzo2ODViNzkwNWZlNmFiOTBjMGU1NDFmYjE3NTA1NDk4NzdmYzgxNzdhOzF8NTYwNDg6MzgyNDc3Ow%3D%3D


16 Free Entrance Days at Our National Parks in 2016: Prepare now to Get Outdoors!

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All National Parks to Offer Free Admission on 16 Days in 2016

WASHINGTON – The National Park Service turns 100 years old in 2016 and wants everyone to celebrate! All national parks will waive their entrance fees on 16 special days in 2016.

The 16 entrance fee-free days for 2016 will be:

  • January 18 – Martin Luther King, Jr. Day
  • April 16 through 24 – National Park Week
  • August 25 through 28 – National Park Service Birthday (and following weekend)
  • September 24 – National Public Lands Day
  • November 11 – Veterans Day

“Fee-free days provide an extra incentive to visit a national park, especially during next year’s centennial celebration,” said National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis. “We added extra fee-free days so that everyone has a chance to join the party. With locations in every state, finding a national park is easy. The hard part might be deciding which ones to visit.”

To honor the National Park Service’s centennial, the National Park Foundation has joined the National Park Service to launch a public engagement campaign called Find Your Park to help all Americans discover all the things that national parks can be. Visit FindYourPark.com for a list of Centennial special events across the country and to learn how to discover, explore, recreate, be inspired, or simply have fun in national parks.

Usually, 127 of the 409 National Park Service sites charge entrance fees that range from $3 to $30. The entrance fee waiver for the fee-free days does not cover amenity or user fees for things like camping, boat launches, transportation, or special tours.

To continue the national park adventure beyond these fee free days, the $80 America the Beautiful National Parks and Federal Recreation Lands Pass allows unlimited entrance to more than 2,000 sites, including all national parks, throughout the year. There are also a variety of free or discounted passes available for senior citizens, current military members, fourth grade students, and disabled citizens.

On August 25, 1916, President Woodrow Wilson signed the act that created the National Park Service “to conserve the scenery and the natural and historic objects and the wild life therein and to provide for the enjoyment of the same in such manner and by such means as will leave them unimpaired for future generations.”

Today, the National Park System includes more than 84 million acres and is comprised of 409 sites with 28 different designations, including national park, national historical park, national monument, national recreation area, national battlefield, and national seashore. Collectively, these sites contain more than 18,000 miles of trails, 27,000 historic and prehistoric structures, 247 species of threatened and endangered species, and 167 million museum items.

Last year, almost 293 million people visited national parks. Those visitors spent $15.7 billion in local communities which supported 277,000 jobs and had a $29.7 billion effect on the economy.

But the impact doesn’t stop there. In addition to national parks, the National Park Service works with tribes, local governments, nonprofit organizations, and businesses across the country to help preserve local history and create close-to-home recreational opportunities. Programs such as the National Register of Historic Places, National Heritage Areas, National Wild and Scenic Rivers, National Historic Landmarks, National Trails, and the Rivers, Trails, Conservation Assistance Program revitalize communities, preserve local history, celebrate local heritage, and provide places for children and families to get outside, be active, and have fun.

www.nps.gov


Youth Internships Available with the National Park Service

Four national internship programs now accepting project proposals – DUE October 30

Please help distribute to others in your park that might be interested in applying

InsideNPS Article

http://inside.nps.gov/index.cfm?handler=viewnpsnewsarticle&type=Announcements&id=17861

The WASO Youth Programs Division is pleased to announce that four national internship programs (See below) are now accepting project proposals for the 2016 summer work season. These professional development internship programs provide quality work experiences for diverse individuals ages 18-35 in various fields across the NPS system. Project proposal applications are due COB Wednesday, October 30thfor most programs listed below.

National Youth Employment Programs:
Historically Black Colleges and Universities Internship Program (HBCUI): This program is designed to link college students attending Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) to appointments at NPS sites and program offices. This program is administered by our nation NPS partner Greening Youth Foundation (GYF) (alex_tremble or 202-513-7159.

Latino Heritage Internship Program (LHIP): LHIP aims to provide meaningful work experiences to Latino students in the fields of cultural resources, interpretation, and outreach. LHIP is administered in partnership with the Hispanic Access Foundation (HAF) and the Environment for the Americas (EFTA). In addition to working on substantive NPS assignments, LHIP interns receive additional mentoring and support through HAF and EFTA. See more at Paloma_bolasny or 202-354-2174.

Mosaics in Science (MIS): The MIS Program provides youth under-represented in natural resource science career fields with meaningful, on-the-ground, work experience in the NPS. The program is administered by the Geologic Resources Division in collaboration with other Natural Resource Stewardship and Science (NRSS) Divisions and the Youth Programs Division. MIS positions are fully funded by the WASO Youth Programs Division. Parks and programs interested in applying for a MIS position must submit a position description by COB Sunday, November 1stat lisa_norby or 303-969-2318.

NPS Academy (NPSA): NPS Academy is an innovative, experiential learning program designed to introduce undergraduate and graduate students, ages 18-35, from under-represented communities to career opportunities with the National Park Service. Many of the interns attend a week-long orientation over spring break and serve in 12-week summer internships tailored to various NPS career tracks. Summer internships are available in a variety of fields, including visitor services, education, resource management – and many more (epoore) or Dave Barak (dbarak) for more information on the application process.

Ben Baldwin

Office of Interpretation, Education & Youth Engagement

Intermountain Regional Office
National Park Service

(303) 969-2319

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Has the National Park Service or the Grand Canyon National Park created a new “group” between commercial and private: noncommercial, organized group

 What has been casually used to define car groups has moved into the area of activities?

 The National Park Service, Grand Canyon National Park issued new regulations concerning running or hiking rim to rim or a rim to rim to rim. Rim to rim hike or run starts at either the North or South Rim, the person follows the trail to the floor of the canyon and then ascends back up to the other rim. A rim to rim to rim you start at one rim runs down and back up to the other rim and then turns around and run back. A rim to rim hike or run is 21 miles and has 4000 drop and gain in altitude.

 In Northern Arizona no matter what time of the year, this is a tough hike or run for one day.

 Of course, once something gets public attention everyone has to do it. (See Everest if you don’t believe this.) Now people are undertaking the feat without enough training, skill or knowledge putting stress on the already overburdened NPS staff and resources.

 It is for that reason that groups of people doing this now require a permit. The Permit information page is here if you are interested in taking a group of seven or more on one of these adventures.

 What caught my attention was the term used to describe these groups. “Noncommercial organized groups.” In the recent past the NPS has used this term to reduce or raise fees on groups visiting the park, mostly by car. This term was applied to church groups, school groups, etc. The term seems to be defined as “Groups and organizations that are non-commercial, and do not qualify for an educational fee waiver (churches, school clubs, scout groups, and other organizations)….” However, this is the first time I have seen it applied to anything other than entering the park.

 By this, I mean the NPS charges a different rate to groups as they come through the front gate. Consequently, the group is identified, fills out a permit and pays the fee as a group.

 Here the term has been applied to an activity in the park. Normally, activities are defined as private or commercial. Private are a group of people where no one makes money on the trip or is paid to be there. Commercial is somewhat defined where someone is making money (not necessarily a profit) or is being paid to go on the trip.

 Is this a new type of permit? Where is this going? Are we going to see it in the future (yes)?

 To Read the Grand Canyon NP article see: Grand Canyon Announces Interim Permits for Organized Groups Conducting Rim-to-Rim and Extended Day Hiking and Running

 To read an article on the issue see: R2R Permits Required at Grand Canyon

 What do you think? Leave a comment.

 If you like this let your friends know or post it on FB, Twitter or LinkedIn

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Business Opportunity Announced for Hospitality Contract on South Rim of Grand Canyon National Park

Feel like entertaining a million people a year? Read on!

Grand Canyon National Park Superintendent Dave Uberuaga has announced the availability of a prospectus for a business opportunity in the park, to provide lodging, food services, retail, transportation, mule rides, and other services on the South Rim.   This prospectus, similar to one announced on August 6, 2013, outlines the business opportunity, describes the existing business, and provides details on how to submit a responsive proposal.

The new 15 year contract is one of the largest in the National Park Service (NPS) in terms of revenue and lodging inventory. The services required in this prospectus have generated an average of approximately $66 million in gross revenues annually.

This historic lodging and hospitality contract (CC-GRCA001-15) will include lodging, retail and food service in the historic Grand Canyon Village including the El Tovar, Bright Angel Lodge, Thunderbird and Kachina Lodges, Maswik Lodge and Phantom Ranch, as well as retail and food service at Hermits Rest.  It will also continue to include transportation services such as bus tours, taxi service and mule rides. 

The historic Desert View Watchtower, which is currently operated as a gift shop, will be transferred to the NPS and will remain open to the public.

Concessions contracts are developed and issued under the authority of the Concessions Management Improvement Act of 1998, P.L. 105-391, and its attending regulations in 36 CFR §51. 

All interested parties are encouraged to apply and submit a responsive proposal to the prospectus. This new opportunity is being advertised on the Federal Business Opportunities web site, www.fbo.gov.  The prospectus is available online at http://www.concessions.nps.gov/prospectuses.htm.  To obtain a paper copy of the prospectus please contact Jennifer Parker at 303-969-2661303-969-2661.

Responsive proposals must be received by the Intermountain Regional Office by Monday, May 12, 2014.  For additional information, please contact Jennifer Parker, Chief of Concessions, Intermountain Region at 303-969-2661303-969-2661. 

What do you think? Leave a comment.

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What a Government Shutdown means to individuals

Curious about how the Government Shutdown will affect some people. Read this email from the Utah Rafters List Serve!

As a United States Government shutdown looms large, plans are now in place to close all National Parks across the country on October 1, 2013. The closures will impact all recreational opportunities at Lee’s Ferry, Arizona, including the cancellation of all river trips.

According to Grand Canyon National Park officials, river runners who have already launched downstream into Grand Canyon National Park will be able to complete their river trip. Glen Canyon National Recreation Area officials, who operate Lee’s Ferry, note that should the government shutdown go into effect, the closure of Lee’s Ferry will start with a “soft closure” beginning at 8:00 am, with a hard closure from noon on, after which no river trips will be allowed to launch.

Kansas river runner Hilary Esry won the river permit lottery last year for an October 7, 2013 launch date after first becoming interested in running Grand Canyon twenty years ago. “We have friends flying in from as far away as Alaska on non-refundable tickets and have spent over $17,000 so far in NPS fees, food and equipment rental. I have a contract with the Federal Government allowing me to launch, and so far, I have not been contacted from the National Park Service at all about a pending closure of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon” she said. “We expect to be on our own and except for the mandatory orientation at Lee’s Ferry, we do not expect to interface with anyone from the NPS. I can’t tell you how nerve wracking this is for our trip.”

The Grand Canyon National Park web site states there are sixteen river trips scheduled to launch in the first seven days of October. Thirteen of those trips are public trips while three are concession guided river trips. There are sixty-one river trips scheduled for the month of October, twelve of which are concessions trips and forty-nine are public trips.

Officials at Glen Canyon National Recreation Area also stated roadwork on the Lee’s Ferry road will continue, as the funds for that project are non-appropriated funds. River runners who have parked their vehicles at the long term parking lot at Lee’s Ferry will be allowed to retrieve their vehicles but this will require a law enforcement escort.

Fishing at Lee’s Ferry, including from the bank and by boat, both public and guided, will not be allowed. The smooth water concessions river trips from the base of Glen Canyon Dam downstream to Lee’s Ferry will also cease operation.

The same will happen at all National Parks. I was talking to the River Rangers for other parks and they fell like crap. People who have waited for months or in the Grand’s case for years may not get to experience the fun, adventure and beauty of a river trip through one of America’s treasurers.

Really, fishing is prohibited……


NPS now on NYC landmark boat tours

Statue Cruises Tour NowFeatures National Park Service Rangers

New York, NY – January 17, 2013 – Statue Cruises announces that National Park Service Rangers are now on board their daily harbor tours. As a new initiative, that started on January 13, 2013, the well-trained rangers will be on-deck and on-hand to lend their valuable expertise to passengers. Designed to enhance the educational aspect of the experience, the rangers will personally engage with passengers by assisting with inquiries and sharing their expert knowledge.

The daily Statue of Liberty Harbor Tours grant up-close views of famed New York City landmarks from the unique perspective of the city’s waterways. Iconic landmarks viewed during the tour include the Statue of Liberty, Ellis Island, the 9-11 Memorial, the South Street Seaport, Governors Island and the Brooklyn Bridge, among others. Departing every 30 minutes daily from 10:00am to 4:45pm, passengers can now expect to interact with uniformed rangers during their hour-long tour.

Statue Cruises COO, Mike Burke, believes the addition of the National Park Service Rangers will make the cruise more memorable for passengers. Burke states, “Visitors will not only enjoy the closest views of the Statue of Liberty but they will be able to learn about the National Monument from the experts themselves.”

Tickets for the narrated sightseeing tours are $24.00 (adults); $17.00 (seniors) and $12.00 (children). Tours depart daily from Battery Park at the foot of Manhattan. Prior to embarking, passengers can purchase tickets online at www.statuecruises.com, by phone at 201-604-2800, or at the seawall in Battery Park. For more information, please visit www.statuecruises.com.

About Statue Cruises

Statue Cruises, the official concessioner to the National Park Service, is the premier harbor cruise operator in New York Harbor, sharing the sights of New York with over 4.0 million annual visitors from around the world. For more information visit: www.statuecruises.com/pressroom.

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Public Input Received on LTEMP EIS Alternatives………long wait, big fight, stay involved

Public Input Received on LTEMP EIS Alternatives
***********************************************

The Bureau of Reclamation and the National Park Serviceextended an opportunity for members of the public to provide input on LTEMP EIS alternatives after

Grand Canyon, Arizona. The canyon, created by ...

preliminary alternative concepts were published in a newsletter on March 30, 2012, and the agencies hosted a public workshop on alternatives in Flagstaff, Arizona on April 4 and 5, 2012. Input was received from the Basin States (consisting of the seven Colorado River Basin states and the Upper Colorado River Commission), the Colorado River Energy Distributors Association (CREDA), the Grand Canyon Trust, and the Irrigation and Electrical Districts Association of Arizona (IEDA). This input can be viewed on the LTEMP EIS website at
http://ltempeis.anl.gov/news/index.cfm#PublicInput

The LTEMP joint-lead agencies are reviewing this material and using it to inform development of alternatives to be considered in the LTEMP EIS.

For More Information
********************

To learn more about how you can participate in the EIS process, visit the “Getting Involved” page of the LTEMP EIS Web Site
(http://ltempeis.anl.gov/involve/index.cfm).

If you have questions or need more information, contact the LTEMP EIS Webmaster at ltempeiswebmaster@anl.gov

Please forward this message to any party you feel may be interested in the LTEMP EIS.

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NPS is chasing a squirrel up a tree and it’s lost in Canyonlands NP.

Outside parties suggest insurance limits of $5 million for concessionaires.

The National Park Service has hired outside firms to determine that concessionaires should have $5 million in liability insurancecoverage. The article does not say how

National Park Service emblem

that number was determined. However, how the limit was determined was wrong.

You determine the amount of insurance you need by determining your insurable interest. How much is your business worth? By that I mean you determine the value of your business, what is worth it, if you were to sell the business.   then buy a little more insurance than that.

Say your business is worth $1 million. Based on all the property, land, income, permits (which allegedly have no value) your CPA has determined that your business valuation is $1 million. You should buy $1.1 million in insurance coverage. Probably, you will end up buying $1.5 or $2 million because polices are rarely written for $1.1 million, usually just big round numbers.

Why? Because you are protecting what you own. That is what insurance is for, to protect an asset. You buy fire insurance to replace a building if it was to burn down. If it cost you $500,000 to rebuild the building, it would be stupid to insure the building for $400,000 and just as stupid to insure it for $600,000. In the first case, you would only have a $400,000 building when you were done, not what you needed. In the second case, you would have a $500,000 building and nothing more. You would have paid a premium on an extra $100,000 of insurance that you will never get.

You can’t insure what you don’t own or for an inflated value.

The same goes for liability insurance. Why insure your business for more than it is worth. All you want to do is keep your business. You don’t want to pay for insurance that you don’t need. All that does with liability insurance provide an incentive to sue and a bigger payoff if they do.  

The last think you want to do is to have less insurance than the value of your business. If your business is worth $1 million, and you have $500,000 in liability insurance, the plaintiff will sue and take your business. That is $500,000 more than your insurance.

You buy the amount of insurance that you need to protect your business from fire, wind, hail and lawsuits.

So what is the NPS going to do?

First, they could bankrupt large business that only buys the minimum to maintain their concession contract. If they are worth more than $5 million, then they will lose their business if a guest has a claim greater than $5 million.

The NPS may also bankrupt businesses if they ask a business with a value of $100,000 to buy a $5 million-dollar policy. They could not afford it.

The only people who will not suffer are those businesses that are worth more than $3.5 million. The $5 million limits are about right.

Based on the article, the NPS will bankrupt a lot of its concessionaires.

The NPS currently has 515 concession contracts in 130 parks, with 60 percent of those contracts generating less than $250,000 in annual revenue.

As stupid as that sounds, this quote from the “insurance professionals” that the NPS hired is even stupider from an insurance standpoint.

Insurance Journal obtained a copy of the Aon Global report dated January 11, 2011. “In our opinion, business operations that potentially could result in serious injury to multiple parties should consider liability limits of at least $5 million,” the Aon report says. “Based on the loss potential, we consider the $5 million limit to be reasonable for most river rafting and guide situations.”

Why is that a stupid statement? Because insurance claims are based on a real value in the end. You total the medical bills, the future medical bills, the lost wages and an amount for pain and suffering and that amount is what a claim amount boils down too. If 99% of your clients make about $50,000, a year and 99% of your injuries are sprained ankles than your claims limits would be $10,000. Someone who can’t work for months and only makes $50,000 a year would after one year out of work, only recover $40,000 or so. The amount earned is discounted because you would not have costs of working and there is a value of getting the money in one lump sum in advance.

To determine the insurance limits an actuary would look at claims. And the claims don’t justify the limits the “experts” are requesting.

Besides insurance is not based on what someone is owed, insurance is based on what you are worth as a business.

Based on the quote above, the value the “experts” came up with is based on a mythical future claim with multiple injured parties.

I’m still waiting for that to happen. Reality and the “experts” have not met. Read the article, the “experts” look pretty bad. Even worse, the NPS admitted that they had no claims like this in testimony before Congress.

Insurance is not determined by guesses or experts, except a business’s CPA. How much is the business worth that is the amount of insurance you need!

See New National Parks’ Insurance Requirements Ignite Controversy or New National Parks Outfitters & Guides Insurance Requirements.

For more articles on the insurance issues see: Insurance 101

What do you think? Leave a comment.

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BioScience Technician positions at Grand Canyon National Park

Grand Canyon National park is currently searching for up to 30 people to help out with Science and Resource ManagementactivitPoster for Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona...ies, including lots of fisheries

field work beginning in November. These positions are intermittent, meaning that there is no guarantee of work and no set work schedule. Intermittent employees are eligible to work up to 1039 hours in a calendar year, with extra paid training hours available as necessary. There is no housing, travel money, or insurance available. However, intermittent employees can receive overtime pay. While Grand Canyon is not guaranteeing any work, intermittent employees do not have to be available for every trip. This type of position is excellent for someone with a (flexible) job or someone that has other seasonal work and may be interested in working in the field when trips are available. These positions can be maintained for years to come.

For more information about the position, and for information about how to apply, please click the following link: http://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/322954400

There will be a lot of backcountry field work with the fisheries program this fall and winter, and other programs within Grand Canyon National Park‘s Science and Resource Management Division have project needs as well. We are especially interested in people with general science and backcountry experience. Please distribute this to anyone that think may be interested. Again, the position is open on USA Jobs from August 13-24.

Thank you,
Emily


Arizona Senators attempt to defend their actions…..poorly

Here is a recent Arizona Republic editorial by Senators McCain and Kyl, followed by a letter-to-the-editor response from Rob Smith of the Sierra Club:

Parks’ noise rules at Canyon went too far

Grand Canyon, Arizona. The canyon, created by ...

by John McCain and Jon Kyl – Jul. 21, 2012 12:00 AM

Our Turn

For over 100 years, people have found different ways to experience the magnificence of the Grand Canyon. Some spend weeks rafting down the Colorado River, while others are content with viewing a fraction of the Canyon’s landscape from man-made overlooks on the South Rim.

Many visitors choose to hike the Canyon, but its challenging trails aren’t for everyone. Fortunately, air-tour operators offer a unique sightseeing experience that’s invaluable to elderly and disabled visitors — including our wounded warriors — who may not otherwise be able to fully explore the Canyon.

The 1987 Overflights Act was intended to restore the park’s “natural quiet,” and we’re proud that today the Grand Canyon isn’t buzzing with the same free-for-all air traffic as it was then.

Regulations were created that tightened air-tour routes, created flight-free zones across much of the park’s airspace, and raised the altitude ceilings for aircraft. Air-tour companies also took the initiative and voluntarily installed $200 million worth of noise-reduction technology in their aircraft. Indeed, the National Park Service has already exceeded the original goal it mandated of making more than 50 percent of the park free of aircraft noise.

Regrettably, the new Park Service plan would have threatened this progress, arbitrarily moving the “natural quiet” goal post from 50 percent to 77 percent of the park and banning tours around sunrise and sunset. This would have deprived many visitors the chance to experience one of the most breathtaking sights in the world. That’s not what Congress intended when it passed the 1987 law, and it’s not justifiable today.

We share the Park Service’s goal of protecting the Canyon, and we have legislated a balance that was already achieved, as well as provided additional incentives to increase the use of quiet-aircraft technology.

We waited 25 years for the Park Service to develop reasonable standards, and when they failed to do so, it was time to act. The stunning beauty of the Grand Canyon will be shared among many Americans in many ways, just as it is today, ensuring that everyone has maximum opportunity to enjoy its full majesty.

John McCain and Jon Kyl, both Republicans, represent Arizona in the U.S. Senate.

McCain, Kyl back aerial clatter at Canyon

Jul. 24, 2012 12:00 AM

How sad that Arizona Sens. John McCain and Jon Kyl would say that visitors to the Grand Canyon should hear air-tour noise instead of the park’s natural quiet (“Parks’ noise rules at Canyon went too far,” Opinions, Saturday).

They say listening to helicopters and airplanes once every four minutes where most people visit is fine. And that’s supposedly the “quiet” half of the park.

And they say early-morning and evening hours should be times of aerial clatter, not magnificent stillness and calm.

And, to top it off, they blame the National Park Service for moving slowly when they themselves have led several congressional attempts to stall the agency from solving this problem for nearly 25 years.

Thanks to The Republic for speaking up for the Grand Canyon (“Congress bungles noise restrictions,” Editorial, July 5). I wish that voice could be heard by our senators above the commercial air-tour noise at the Grand Canyon.

Thanks to the Grand Canyon River Guides Association for this info.


Glen Canyon Dam LTEMP EIS Upcoming Public Meeting to Discuss Alternatives

LTEMP EIS Upcoming Public Meeting to Discuss Alternatives
*********************************************************

The public is invited to participate in a two-day meeting on alternatives being considered for inclusion in the Glen Canyon DamLong Term

Glen Canyon Dam

Glen Canyon Dam (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Experimental and Management Plan Environmental Impact Statement (LTEMP EIS) being prepared by the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and the National Park Service (NPS). The meeting will be held on April 4 and 5 at the High Country Conference Center located at 201 West Butler Avenue, Flagstaff, AZ 86001. The meeting is tentatively scheduled for 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days.

The preliminary draft alternatives being considered for evaluation will be presented and discussed at this meeting hosted by Reclamation and the NPS. Stakeholders and other attendees who have alternatives to propose should bring those ideas to the meeting. PowerPoint slides and posters are welcome. To be added to the agenda, register for the meeting as explained below, provide your email address, and indicate that you will be presenting an alternative.

Those wishing to attend the meeting are encouraged to register through the LTEMP EIS Web site at http://ltempeis.anl.gov/involve/pubschedule/, but registration is not required.
Alternatives to be considered in the EIS must meet the purpose and need of the LTEMP. The EIS will document and evaluate the impacts of the alternatives carried forward for analysis.

For More Information
********************

To learn more about how you can participate in the EIS process, visit the “Getting Involved” page of the LTEMP EIS Web Site
(http://ltempeis.anl.gov/involve/index.cfm).

If you have questions or need more information, contact the LTEMP EIS Webmaster at ltempeiswebmaster@anl.gov

Please forward this message to any party you feel may be interested in the LTEMP EIS.

_________________CONTACTS/SUBSCRIPTIONS________________

FEEDBACK

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Grand Canyon LTEMP EIS Scoping Report Available and Web-Based Meetings

LTEMP EIS Scoping Report Available
**********************************

Glen Canyon Dam

Image via Wikipedia

Public comments on the scope of the Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan (LTEMP) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Glen Canyon Dam operations were gathered by the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and the National Park Service (NPS) during the Public Scoping Period, which closed on January 31, 2012. A series of public scoping meetings were held in November 2011. During these meetings, Reclamation and the NPS provided the public with information about the LTEMP EIS and opportunities to meet with and ask questions of technical experts.

Reclamation and the NPS have reviewed and evaluated the comments received and developed the “Summary of Public Scoping Comments on the Glen Canyon Dam Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan Environmental Impact Statement” (Scoping Report), which is now available on the Documents page of the LTEMP EIS Web site at http://ltempeis.anl.gov/documents/

Upcoming Web-Based Public Meetings
**********************************

Two Web-based public meetings will be held on March 27, 2012 at 1:00pm and 6:00pm Mountain Daylight Time. The public is invited to participate in these meetings, which will provide a summary of public comments on the scope of the LTEMP EIS. The public will be able to watch a live overview of the Scoping Report, and will have an opportunity to ask questions of technical experts and managers involved in the EIS.

Those wishing to participate are encouraged to register through the LTEMP EIS Web site at http://ltempeis.anl.gov/involve/pubschedule/, but registration is not required. Participants are encouraged to log on to the webcast about 15 minutes before the start of each meeting to ensure they are connected before the meeting begins. For instructions on how to join and how to ask questions during the meetings, see
http://ltempeis.anl.gov/involve/pubschedule/

For More Information
********************

To learn more about how you can participate in the EIS process, visit the “Getting Involved” page of the LTEMP EIS Web Site
(http://ltempeis.anl.gov/involve/index.cfm).

If you have questions or need more information, contact the LTEMP EIS Webmaster at ltempeiswebmaster@anl.gov

Please forward this message to any party you feel may be interested in the LTEMP EIS.

_________________CONTACTS/SUBSCRIPTIONS________________

FEEDBACK

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Pathways to Success Conference & Training: Integrating Human Dimensions into Fish and Wildlife Management

Register Today

Pathways to Success Conference & Training:

Fish Head Pinyon Pine

Fish Head Pinyon Pine (Photo credit: James Marvin Phelps)

Integrating Human Dimensions into Fish and Wildlife Management

Breckenridge, Colorado

Beaver Run Resort

September 24-27, 2012

Visit our website at www.hdfwconference.org to learn more.

Keynote speaker: Gary Machlis, Chief Science Advisor, NPS

Abstract and Proposal Deadline: May 1, 2012

Conference Themes:

Biodiversity and Coupled Social-Ecological Systems
Fish and Wildlife Governance
The Changing Nature of Wildlife Conservation
Enduring Issues in HDFW
Improving HDFW Science
Increasing HDFW Capacity
Working with the Public
Implications of Global Change
Human Wildlife Conflict
Wildlife in an Ecosystem Services Paradigm
Discourses about Wildlife
Demographics and Fish and Wildlife Policy

Mike Manfredo

Conference Co-Chair, Pathways to Success Integrating Human Dimension into Fish and Wildlife Management

Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Department

Colorado State University

Jerry Vaske

Conference Co-Chair, Pathways to Success Integrating Human Dimension into Fish and Wildlife Management

Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Department

Colorado State University

Northernmost natural population

Image via Wikipedia

Dan Decker

Conference Co-Chair, Pathways to Success Integrating Human Dimension into Fish and Wildlife Management

Professor, Natural Resources

Director, Human Dimensions Research Unit

Cornell University

Esther Duke

Coordinator, Pathways to Success: Integrating Human Dimension into Fish and Wildlife Management Conference

Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Department

Colorado State University

Esther Duke

Coordinator of Special Projects and Programs

Human Dimensions of Natural Resources

Colorado State University

970.491.2197

Esther.Duke

 

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