New Book Aids Both CEOs and Students

“Outdoor Recreation Insurance, Risk Management, and Law” is a definitive guide to preventing and overcoming legal issues in the outdoor recreation industry

Denver based James H. Moss, JD, an attorney who specializes in the legal issues of outdoor recreation and adventure travel companies, guides, outfitters, and manufacturers, has written a comprehensive legal guidebook titled, “Outdoor Recreation Insurance, Risk Management, and Law”. Sagamore Publishing, a well-known Illinois-based educational publisher, distributes the book.

Mr. Moss, who applied his 30 years of experience with the legal, insurance, and risk management issues of the outdoor industry, wrote the book in order to fill a void.

There was nothing out there that looked at case law and applied it to legal problems in outdoor recreation,” Moss explained. “The goal of this book is to provide sound advice based on past law and experience.”

The Reference book is sold via the Summit Magic Publishing, LLC.

While written as a college-level textbook, the guide also serves as a legal primer for executives, managers, and business owners in the field of outdoor recreation. It discusses how to tackle, prevent, and overcome legal issues in all areas of the industry.

The book is organized into 14 chapters that are easily accessed as standalone topics, or read through comprehensively. Specific topics include rental programs, statues that affect outdoor recreation, skiing and ski areas, and defenses to claims. Mr. Moss also incorporated listings of legal definitions, cases, and statutes, making the book easy for laypeople to understand.

PURCHASE

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Table of Cases

Introduction

Outdoor Recreation Law and Insurance: Overview

Risk

    Risk

        Perception versus Actual Risk

        Risk v. Reward

        Risk Evaluation

    Risk Management Strategies

        Humans & Risk

        Risk = Accidents

        Accidents may/may not lead to litigation

    How Do You Deal with Risk?

    How Does Acceptance of Risk Convert to Litigation?

    Negative Feelings against the Business

Risk, Accidents & Litigation

        No Real Acceptance of the Risk

        No Money to Pay Injury Bills

        No Health Insurance

        Insurance Company Subrogation

        Negative Feelings

Litigation

    Dealing with Different People

    Dealing with Victims

        Develop a Friend & Eliminate a Lawsuit

        Don’t Compound Minor Problems into Major Lawsuits

    Emergency Medical Services

    Additional Causes of Lawsuits in Outdoor Recreation

        Employees

        How Do You Handle A Victim?

        Dealing with Different People

        Dealing with Victims

Legal System in the United States

    Courts

        State Court System

        Federal Court System

        Other Court Systems

    Laws

    Statutes

    Parties to a Lawsuit

    Attorneys

    Trials

Law

    Torts

        Negligence

            Duty

            Breach of the Duty

            Injury

            Proximate Causation

            Damages

        Determination of Duty Owed

        Duty of an Outfitter

        Duty of a Guide

        Duty of Livery Owner

        Duty of Rental Agent

        Duty of Volunteer Youth Leader

        In Loco Parentis

    Intentional Torts

    Gross Negligence

    Willful & Wanton Negligence

    Intentional Negligence

    Negligence Per Se

    Strict Liability

    Attractive Nuisance

    Results of Acts That Are More than Ordinary Negligence

    Product Liability

    Contracts

        Breach of Contract

        Breach of Warranty

        Express Warranty

        Implied Warranty

            Warranty of Fitness for a Particular Purpose

            Warranty of Merchantability

            Warranty of Statute

    Detrimental Reliance

    Unjust Enrichment

    Liquor Liability

    Food Service Liability

    Damages

        Compensatory Damages

        Special Damages

        Punitive Damages

Statutory Defenses

    Skier Safety Acts

    Whitewater Guides & Outfitters

    Equine Liability Acts

 

Legal Defenses

    Assumption of Risk

        Express Assumption of Risk

        Implied Assumption of Risk

        Primary Assumption of Risk

        Secondary Assumption of Risk

    Contributory Negligence

    Assumption of Risk & Minors

    Inherent Dangers

    Assumption of Risk Documents.

        Assumption of Risk as a Defense.

        Statutory Assumption of Risk

        Express Assumption of Risk

    Contributory Negligence

    Joint and Several Liability

Release, Waivers & Contracts Not to Sue

    Why do you need them

    Exculpatory Agreements

        Releases

        Waivers

        Covenants Not to sue

    Who should be covered

    What should be included

        Negligence Clause

        Jurisdiction & Venue Clause

        Assumption of Risk

        Other Clauses

        Indemnification

            Hold Harmless Agreement

        Liquidated Damages

        Previous Experience

        Misc

            Photography release

            Video Disclaimer

            Drug and/or Alcohol clause

            Medical Transportation & Release

                HIPAA

        Problem Areas

    What the Courts do not want to see

Statute of Limitations

        Minors

        Adults

Defenses Myths

    Agreements to Participate

    Parental Consent Agreements

    Informed Consent Agreements

    Certification

    Accreditation

    Standards, Guidelines & Protocols

    License

Specific Occupational Risks

    Personal Liability of Instructors, Teachers & Educators

        College & University Issues

    Animal Operations, Packers

        Equine Activities

    Canoe Livery Operations

        Tube rentals

Downhill Skiing

Ski Rental Programs

Indoor Climbing Walls

Instructional Programs

Mountaineering

Retail Rental Programs

Rock Climbing

Tubing Hills

Whitewater Rafting

Risk Management Plan

    Introduction for Risk Management Plans

    What Is A Risk Management Plan?

    What should be in a Risk Management Plan

    Risk Management Plan Template

    Ideas on Developing a Risk Management Plan

    Preparing your Business for Unknown Disasters

    Building Fire & Evacuation

Dealing with an Emergency

 

Insurance

    Theory of Insurance

    Insurance Companies

    Deductibles

    Self-Insured Retention

    Personal v. Commercial Policies

    Types of Policies

        Automobile

            Comprehension

            Collision

            Bodily Injury

            Property Damage

            Uninsured Motorist

            Personal Injury Protection

            Non-Owned Automobile

            Hired Car

    Fire Policy

        Coverage

        Liability

        Named Peril v. All Risk

    Commercial Policies

    Underwriting

    Exclusions

    Special Endorsements

    Rescue Reimbursement

    Policy Procedures

    Coverage’s

    Agents

    Brokers

        General Agents

        Captive Agents

    Types of Policies

        Claims Made

        Occurrence

    Claims

    Federal and State Government Insurance Requirements

Bibliography

Index

The 427-page volume is sold via Summit Magic Publishing, LLC.

 


What is a Risk Management Plan and What do You Need in Yours?

Everyone has told you, you need a risk management plan. A plan to follow if you have a crisis. You‘ve seen several and they look burdensome and difficult to write. Need help writing a risk management plan? Need to know what should be in your risk management plan? Need Help?

This book can help you understand and write your plan. This book is designed to help you rest easy about what you need to do and how to do it. More importantly, this book will make sure you plan is a workable plan, not one that will create liability for you.

 

                                             Table of Contents

Chapter 1    Outdoor Recreation Risk Management, Law, and Insurance: An Overview

Chapter 2    U.S. Legal System and Legal Research

Chapter 3    Risk 25

Chapter 4    Risk, Accidents, and Litigation: Why People Sue

Chapter 5    Law 57

Chapter 6    Statutes that Affect Outdoor Recreation

Chapter 7    PreInjury Contracts to Prevent Litigation: Releases

Chapter 8    Defenses to Claims

Chapter 9    Minors

Chapter 10    Skiing and Ski Areas

Chapter 11    Other Commercial Recreational Activities

Chapter 12    Water Sports, Paddlesports, and water-based activities

Chapter 13    Rental Programs

Chapter 14    Insurance

               $99.00 plus shipping


Need a Handy Reference Guide to Understand your Insurance Policy?

This book should be on every outfitter and guide’s desk. It will answer your questions, help you sleep at night, help you answer your guests’ questions and allow you to run your business with less worry.

Table of Contents

Chapter 1    Outdoor Recreation Risk Management, Law, and Insurance: An Overview

Chapter 2    U.S. Legal System and Legal Research

Chapter 3    Risk 25

Chapter 4    Risk, Accidents, and Litigation: Why People Sue

Chapter 5    Law 57

Chapter 6    Statutes that Affect Outdoor Recreation

Chapter 7    PreInjury Contracts to Prevent Litigation: Releases

Chapter 8    Defenses to Claims

Chapter 9    Minors

Chapter 10    Skiing and Ski Areas

Chapter 11    Other Commercial Recreational Activities

Chapter 12    Water Sports, Paddlesports, and water-based activities

Chapter 13    Rental Programs

Chapter 14    Insurance

             $99.00 plus shipping


New Book Aids Both CEOs and Students

“Outdoor Recreation Insurance, Risk Management, and Law” is a definitive guide to preventing and overcoming legal issues in the outdoor recreation industry

Denver based James H. Moss, JD, an attorney who specializes in the legal issues of outdoor recreation and adventure travel companies, guides, outfitters, and manufacturers, has written a comprehensive legal guidebook titled, “Outdoor Recreation Insurance, Risk Management, and Law”. Sagamore Publishing, a well-known Illinois-based educational publisher, distributes the book.

Mr. Moss, who applied his 30 years of experience with the legal, insurance, and risk management issues of the outdoor industry, wrote the book in order to fill a void.

There was nothing out there that looked at case law and applied it to legal problems in outdoor recreation,” Moss explained. “The goal of this book is to provide sound advice based on past law and experience.”

The Reference book is sold via the Summit Magic Publishing, LLC.

While written as a college-level textbook, the guide also serves as a legal primer for executives, managers, and business owners in the field of outdoor recreation. It discusses how to tackle, prevent, and overcome legal issues in all areas of the industry.

The book is organized into 14 chapters that are easily accessed as standalone topics, or read through comprehensively. Specific topics include rental programs, statues that affect outdoor recreation, skiing and ski areas, and defenses to claims. Mr. Moss also incorporated listings of legal definitions, cases, and statutes, making the book easy for laypeople to understand.

PURCHASE

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Table of Cases

Introduction

Outdoor Recreation Law and Insurance: Overview

Risk

    Risk

        Perception versus Actual Risk

        Risk v. Reward

        Risk Evaluation

    Risk Management Strategies

        Humans & Risk

        Risk = Accidents

        Accidents may/may not lead to litigation

    How Do You Deal with Risk?

    How Does Acceptance of Risk Convert to Litigation?

    Negative Feelings against the Business

Risk, Accidents & Litigation

        No Real Acceptance of the Risk

        No Money to Pay Injury Bills

        No Health Insurance

        Insurance Company Subrogation

        Negative Feelings

Litigation

    Dealing with Different People

    Dealing with Victims

        Develop a Friend & Eliminate a Lawsuit

        Don’t Compound Minor Problems into Major Lawsuits

    Emergency Medical Services

    Additional Causes of Lawsuits in Outdoor Recreation

        Employees

        How Do You Handle A Victim?

        Dealing with Different People

        Dealing with Victims

Legal System in the United States

    Courts

        State Court System

        Federal Court System

        Other Court Systems

    Laws

    Statutes

    Parties to a Lawsuit

    Attorneys

    Trials

Law

    Torts

        Negligence

            Duty

            Breach of the Duty

            Injury

            Proximate Causation

            Damages

        Determination of Duty Owed

        Duty of an Outfitter

        Duty of a Guide

        Duty of Livery Owner

        Duty of Rental Agent

        Duty of Volunteer Youth Leader

        In Loco Parentis

    Intentional Torts

    Gross Negligence

    Willful & Wanton Negligence

    Intentional Negligence

    Negligence Per Se

    Strict Liability

    Attractive Nuisance

    Results of Acts That Are More than Ordinary Negligence

    Product Liability

    Contracts

        Breach of Contract

        Breach of Warranty

        Express Warranty

        Implied Warranty

            Warranty of Fitness for a Particular Purpose

            Warranty of Merchantability

            Warranty of Statute

    Detrimental Reliance

    Unjust Enrichment

    Liquor Liability

    Food Service Liability

    Damages

        Compensatory Damages

        Special Damages

        Punitive Damages

Statutory Defenses

    Skier Safety Acts

    Whitewater Guides & Outfitters

    Equine Liability Acts

 

Legal Defenses

    Assumption of Risk

        Express Assumption of Risk

        Implied Assumption of Risk

        Primary Assumption of Risk

        Secondary Assumption of Risk

    Contributory Negligence

    Assumption of Risk & Minors

    Inherent Dangers

    Assumption of Risk Documents.

        Assumption of Risk as a Defense.

        Statutory Assumption of Risk

        Express Assumption of Risk

    Contributory Negligence

    Joint and Several Liability

Release, Waivers & Contracts Not to Sue

    Why do you need them

    Exculpatory Agreements

        Releases

        Waivers

        Covenants Not to sue

    Who should be covered

    What should be included

        Negligence Clause

        Jurisdiction & Venue Clause

        Assumption of Risk

        Other Clauses

        Indemnification

            Hold Harmless Agreement

        Liquidated Damages

        Previous Experience

        Misc

            Photography release

            Video Disclaimer

            Drug and/or Alcohol clause

            Medical Transportation & Release

                HIPAA

        Problem Areas

    What the Courts do not want to see

Statute of Limitations

        Minors

        Adults

Defenses Myths

    Agreements to Participate

    Parental Consent Agreements

    Informed Consent Agreements

    Certification

    Accreditation

    Standards, Guidelines & Protocols

    License

Specific Occupational Risks

    Personal Liability of Instructors, Teachers & Educators

        College & University Issues

    Animal Operations, Packers

        Equine Activities

    Canoe Livery Operations

        Tube rentals

Downhill Skiing

Ski Rental Programs

Indoor Climbing Walls

Instructional Programs

Mountaineering

Retail Rental Programs

Rock Climbing

Tubing Hills

Whitewater Rafting

Risk Management Plan

    Introduction for Risk Management Plans

    What Is A Risk Management Plan?

    What should be in a Risk Management Plan

    Risk Management Plan Template

    Ideas on Developing a Risk Management Plan

    Preparing your Business for Unknown Disasters

    Building Fire & Evacuation

Dealing with an Emergency

 

Insurance

    Theory of Insurance

    Insurance Companies

    Deductibles

    Self-Insured Retention

    Personal v. Commercial Policies

    Types of Policies

        Automobile

            Comprehension

            Collision

            Bodily Injury

            Property Damage

            Uninsured Motorist

            Personal Injury Protection

            Non-Owned Automobile

            Hired Car

    Fire Policy

        Coverage

        Liability

        Named Peril v. All Risk

    Commercial Policies

    Underwriting

    Exclusions

    Special Endorsements

    Rescue Reimbursement

    Policy Procedures

    Coverage’s

    Agents

    Brokers

        General Agents

        Captive Agents

    Types of Policies

        Claims Made

        Occurrence

    Claims

    Federal and State Government Insurance Requirements

Bibliography

Index

The 427-page volume is sold via Summit Magic Publishing, LLC.

 


New Book Aids Both CEOs and Students

“Outdoor Recreation Insurance, Risk Management, and Law” is a definitive guide to preventing and overcoming legal issues in the outdoor recreation industry

Denver based James H. Moss, JD, an attorney who specializes in the legal issues of outdoor recreation and adventure travel companies, guides, outfitters, and manufacturers, has written a comprehensive legal guidebook titled, “Outdoor Recreation Insurance, Risk Management, and Law”. Sagamore Publishing, a well-known Illinois-based educational publisher, distributes the book.

Mr. Moss, who applied his 30 years of experience with the legal, insurance, and risk management issues of the outdoor industry, wrote the book in order to fill a void.

There was nothing out there that looked at case law and applied it to legal problems in outdoor recreation,” Moss explained. “The goal of this book is to provide sound advice based on past law and experience.”

The Reference book is sold via the Summit Magic Publishing, LLC.

While written as a college-level textbook, the guide also serves as a legal primer for executives, managers, and business owners in the field of outdoor recreation. It discusses how to tackle, prevent, and overcome legal issues in all areas of the industry.

The book is organized into 14 chapters that are easily accessed as standalone topics, or read through comprehensively. Specific topics include rental programs, statues that affect outdoor recreation, skiing and ski areas, and defenses to claims. Mr. Moss also incorporated listings of legal definitions, cases, and statutes, making the book easy for laypeople to understand.

PURCHASE

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Table of Cases

Introduction

Outdoor Recreation Law and Insurance: Overview

Risk

    Risk

        Perception versus Actual Risk

        Risk v. Reward

        Risk Evaluation

    Risk Management Strategies

        Humans & Risk

        Risk = Accidents

        Accidents may/may not lead to litigation

    How Do You Deal with Risk?

    How Does Acceptance of Risk Convert to Litigation?

    Negative Feelings against the Business

Risk, Accidents & Litigation

        No Real Acceptance of the Risk

        No Money to Pay Injury Bills

        No Health Insurance

        Insurance Company Subrogation

        Negative Feelings

Litigation

    Dealing with Different People

    Dealing with Victims

        Develop a Friend & Eliminate a Lawsuit

        Don’t Compound Minor Problems into Major Lawsuits

    Emergency Medical Services

    Additional Causes of Lawsuits in Outdoor Recreation

        Employees

        How Do You Handle A Victim?

        Dealing with Different People

        Dealing with Victims

Legal System in the United States

    Courts

        State Court System

        Federal Court System

        Other Court Systems

    Laws

    Statutes

    Parties to a Lawsuit

    Attorneys

    Trials

Law

    Torts

        Negligence

            Duty

            Breach of the Duty

            Injury

            Proximate Causation

            Damages

        Determination of Duty Owed

        Duty of an Outfitter

        Duty of a Guide

        Duty of Livery Owner

        Duty of Rental Agent

        Duty of Volunteer Youth Leader

        In Loco Parentis

    Intentional Torts

    Gross Negligence

    Willful & Wanton Negligence

    Intentional Negligence

    Negligence Per Se

    Strict Liability

    Attractive Nuisance

    Results of Acts That Are More than Ordinary Negligence

    Product Liability

    Contracts

        Breach of Contract

        Breach of Warranty

        Express Warranty

        Implied Warranty

            Warranty of Fitness for a Particular Purpose

            Warranty of Merchantability

            Warranty of Statute

    Detrimental Reliance

    Unjust Enrichment

    Liquor Liability

    Food Service Liability

    Damages

        Compensatory Damages

        Special Damages

        Punitive Damages

Statutory Defenses

    Skier Safety Acts

    Whitewater Guides & Outfitters

    Equine Liability Acts

 

Legal Defenses

    Assumption of Risk

        Express Assumption of Risk

        Implied Assumption of Risk

        Primary Assumption of Risk

        Secondary Assumption of Risk

    Contributory Negligence

    Assumption of Risk & Minors

    Inherent Dangers

    Assumption of Risk Documents.

        Assumption of Risk as a Defense.

        Statutory Assumption of Risk

        Express Assumption of Risk

    Contributory Negligence

    Joint and Several Liability

Release, Waivers & Contracts Not to Sue

    Why do you need them

    Exculpatory Agreements

        Releases

        Waivers

        Covenants Not to sue

    Who should be covered

    What should be included

        Negligence Clause

        Jurisdiction & Venue Clause

        Assumption of Risk

        Other Clauses

        Indemnification

            Hold Harmless Agreement

        Liquidated Damages

        Previous Experience

        Misc

            Photography release

            Video Disclaimer

            Drug and/or Alcohol clause

            Medical Transportation & Release

                HIPAA

        Problem Areas

    What the Courts do not want to see

Statute of Limitations

        Minors

        Adults

Defenses Myths

    Agreements to Participate

    Parental Consent Agreements

    Informed Consent Agreements

    Certification

    Accreditation

    Standards, Guidelines & Protocols

    License

Specific Occupational Risks

    Personal Liability of Instructors, Teachers & Educators

        College & University Issues

    Animal Operations, Packers

        Equine Activities

    Canoe Livery Operations

        Tube rentals

Downhill Skiing

Ski Rental Programs

Indoor Climbing Walls

Instructional Programs

Mountaineering

Retail Rental Programs

Rock Climbing

Tubing Hills

Whitewater Rafting

Risk Management Plan

    Introduction for Risk Management Plans

    What Is A Risk Management Plan?

    What should be in a Risk Management Plan

    Risk Management Plan Template

    Ideas on Developing a Risk Management Plan

    Preparing your Business for Unknown Disasters

    Building Fire & Evacuation

Dealing with an Emergency

 

Insurance

    Theory of Insurance

    Insurance Companies

    Deductibles

    Self-Insured Retention

    Personal v. Commercial Policies

    Types of Policies

        Automobile

            Comprehension

            Collision

            Bodily Injury

            Property Damage

            Uninsured Motorist

            Personal Injury Protection

            Non-Owned Automobile

            Hired Car

    Fire Policy

        Coverage

        Liability

        Named Peril v. All Risk

    Commercial Policies

    Underwriting

    Exclusions

    Special Endorsements

    Rescue Reimbursement

    Policy Procedures

    Coverage’s

    Agents

    Brokers

        General Agents

        Captive Agents

    Types of Policies

        Claims Made

        Occurrence

    Claims

    Federal and State Government Insurance Requirements

Bibliography

Index

The 427-page volume is sold via Summit Magic Publishing, LLC.

 


What is a Risk Management Plan and What do You Need in Yours?

Everyone has told you, you need a risk management plan. A plan to follow if you have a crisis. You‘ve seen several and they look burdensome and difficult to write. Need help writing a risk management plan? Need to know what should be in your risk management plan? Need Help?

This book can help you understand and write your plan. This book is designed to help you rest easy about what you need to do and how to do it. More importantly, this book will make sure you plan is a workable plan, not one that will create liability for you.

 

                                             Table of Contents

Chapter 1    Outdoor Recreation Risk Management, Law, and Insurance: An Overview

Chapter 2    U.S. Legal System and Legal Research

Chapter 3    Risk 25

Chapter 4    Risk, Accidents, and Litigation: Why People Sue

Chapter 5    Law 57

Chapter 6    Statutes that Affect Outdoor Recreation

Chapter 7    PreInjury Contracts to Prevent Litigation: Releases

Chapter 8    Defenses to Claims

Chapter 9    Minors

Chapter 10    Skiing and Ski Areas

Chapter 11    Other Commercial Recreational Activities

Chapter 12    Water Sports, Paddlesports, and water-based activities

Chapter 13    Rental Programs

Chapter 14    Insurance

               $99.00 plus shipping


Need a Handy Reference Guide to Understand your Insurance Policy?

This book should be on every outfitter and guide’s desk. It will answer your questions, help you sleep at night, help you answer your guests’ questions and allow you to run your business with less worry.

Table of Contents

Chapter 1    Outdoor Recreation Risk Management, Law, and Insurance: An Overview

Chapter 2    U.S. Legal System and Legal Research

Chapter 3    Risk 25

Chapter 4    Risk, Accidents, and Litigation: Why People Sue

Chapter 5    Law 57

Chapter 6    Statutes that Affect Outdoor Recreation

Chapter 7    PreInjury Contracts to Prevent Litigation: Releases

Chapter 8    Defenses to Claims

Chapter 9    Minors

Chapter 10    Skiing and Ski Areas

Chapter 11    Other Commercial Recreational Activities

Chapter 12    Water Sports, Paddlesports, and water-based activities

Chapter 13    Rental Programs

Chapter 14    Insurance

             $99.00 plus shipping


New Book Aids Both CEOs and Students

“Outdoor Recreation Insurance, Risk Management, and Law” is a definitive guide to preventing and overcoming legal issues in the outdoor recreation industry

Denver based James H. Moss, JD, an attorney who specializes in the legal issues of outdoor recreation and adventure travel companies, guides, outfitters, and manufacturers, has written a comprehensive legal guidebook titled, “Outdoor Recreation Insurance, Risk Management, and Law”. Sagamore Publishing, a well-known Illinois-based educational publisher, distributes the book.

Mr. Moss, who applied his 30 years of experience with the legal, insurance, and risk management issues of the outdoor industry, wrote the book in order to fill a void.

There was nothing out there that looked at case law and applied it to legal problems in outdoor recreation,” Moss explained. “The goal of this book is to provide sound advice based on past law and experience.”

The Reference book is sold via the Summit Magic Publishing, LLC.

While written as a college-level textbook, the guide also serves as a legal primer for executives, managers, and business owners in the field of outdoor recreation. It discusses how to tackle, prevent, and overcome legal issues in all areas of the industry.

The book is organized into 14 chapters that are easily accessed as standalone topics, or read through comprehensively. Specific topics include rental programs, statues that affect outdoor recreation, skiing and ski areas, and defenses to claims. Mr. Moss also incorporated listings of legal definitions, cases, and statutes, making the book easy for laypeople to understand.

PURCHASE

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Table of Cases

Introduction

Outdoor Recreation Law and Insurance: Overview

Risk

    Risk

        Perception versus Actual Risk

        Risk v. Reward

        Risk Evaluation

    Risk Management Strategies

        Humans & Risk

        Risk = Accidents

        Accidents may/may not lead to litigation

    How Do You Deal with Risk?

    How Does Acceptance of Risk Convert to Litigation?

    Negative Feelings against the Business

Risk, Accidents & Litigation

        No Real Acceptance of the Risk

        No Money to Pay Injury Bills

        No Health Insurance

        Insurance Company Subrogation

        Negative Feelings

Litigation

    Dealing with Different People

    Dealing with Victims

        Develop a Friend & Eliminate a Lawsuit

        Don’t Compound Minor Problems into Major Lawsuits

    Emergency Medical Services

    Additional Causes of Lawsuits in Outdoor Recreation

        Employees

        How Do You Handle A Victim?

        Dealing with Different People

        Dealing with Victims

Legal System in the United States

    Courts

        State Court System

        Federal Court System

        Other Court Systems

    Laws

    Statutes

    Parties to a Lawsuit

    Attorneys

    Trials

Law

    Torts

        Negligence

            Duty

            Breach of the Duty

            Injury

            Proximate Causation

            Damages

        Determination of Duty Owed

        Duty of an Outfitter

        Duty of a Guide

        Duty of Livery Owner

        Duty of Rental Agent

        Duty of Volunteer Youth Leader

        In Loco Parentis

    Intentional Torts

    Gross Negligence

    Willful & Wanton Negligence

    Intentional Negligence

    Negligence Per Se

    Strict Liability

    Attractive Nuisance

    Results of Acts That Are More than Ordinary Negligence

    Product Liability

    Contracts

        Breach of Contract

        Breach of Warranty

        Express Warranty

        Implied Warranty

            Warranty of Fitness for a Particular Purpose

            Warranty of Merchantability

            Warranty of Statute

    Detrimental Reliance

    Unjust Enrichment

    Liquor Liability

    Food Service Liability

    Damages

        Compensatory Damages

        Special Damages

        Punitive Damages

Statutory Defenses

    Skier Safety Acts

    Whitewater Guides & Outfitters

    Equine Liability Acts

 

Legal Defenses

    Assumption of Risk

        Express Assumption of Risk

        Implied Assumption of Risk

        Primary Assumption of Risk

        Secondary Assumption of Risk

    Contributory Negligence

    Assumption of Risk & Minors

    Inherent Dangers

    Assumption of Risk Documents.

        Assumption of Risk as a Defense.

        Statutory Assumption of Risk

        Express Assumption of Risk

    Contributory Negligence

    Joint and Several Liability

Release, Waivers & Contracts Not to Sue

    Why do you need them

    Exculpatory Agreements

        Releases

        Waivers

        Covenants Not to sue

    Who should be covered

    What should be included

        Negligence Clause

        Jurisdiction & Venue Clause

        Assumption of Risk

        Other Clauses

        Indemnification

            Hold Harmless Agreement

        Liquidated Damages

        Previous Experience

        Misc

            Photography release

            Video Disclaimer

            Drug and/or Alcohol clause

            Medical Transportation & Release

                HIPAA

        Problem Areas

    What the Courts do not want to see

Statute of Limitations

        Minors

        Adults

Defenses Myths

    Agreements to Participate

    Parental Consent Agreements

    Informed Consent Agreements

    Certification

    Accreditation

    Standards, Guidelines & Protocols

    License

Specific Occupational Risks

    Personal Liability of Instructors, Teachers & Educators

        College & University Issues

    Animal Operations, Packers

        Equine Activities

    Canoe Livery Operations

        Tube rentals

Downhill Skiing

Ski Rental Programs

Indoor Climbing Walls

Instructional Programs

Mountaineering

Retail Rental Programs

Rock Climbing

Tubing Hills

Whitewater Rafting

Risk Management Plan

    Introduction for Risk Management Plans

    What Is A Risk Management Plan?

    What should be in a Risk Management Plan

    Risk Management Plan Template

    Ideas on Developing a Risk Management Plan

    Preparing your Business for Unknown Disasters

    Building Fire & Evacuation

Dealing with an Emergency

 

Insurance

    Theory of Insurance

    Insurance Companies

    Deductibles

    Self-Insured Retention

    Personal v. Commercial Policies

    Types of Policies

        Automobile

            Comprehension

            Collision

            Bodily Injury

            Property Damage

            Uninsured Motorist

            Personal Injury Protection

            Non-Owned Automobile

            Hired Car

    Fire Policy

        Coverage

        Liability

        Named Peril v. All Risk

    Commercial Policies

    Underwriting

    Exclusions

    Special Endorsements

    Rescue Reimbursement

    Policy Procedures

    Coverage’s

    Agents

    Brokers

        General Agents

        Captive Agents

    Types of Policies

        Claims Made

        Occurrence

    Claims

    Federal and State Government Insurance Requirements

Bibliography

Index

The 427-page volume is sold via Summit Magic Publishing, LLC.

 


Act Now & Stop this Minnesota bill

Minnesota Legislation is considering a bill that would eliminate releases (waivers) in Minnesota for recreational activities.

What the legislature does not understand is this bill will eliminate recreational activities in Minnesota.

Again, the Minnesota Senate and the House have introduced bills to ban releases in MN for recreational activities. Here is a copy of the Senate bill.

A bill for an act relating to civil actions; voiding a waiver of liability for ordinary negligence involving a consumer service; amending Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 604.055, subdivision 1.

BE IT ENACTED BY THE LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF MINNESOTA:

Section 1.

Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 604.055, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

Subdivision 1.

Certain agreements are void and unenforceable.

An agreement between parties for a consumer service, including a recreational activity, that purports to release, limit, or waive the liability of one party for damage, injuries, or death resulting from conduct that constitutes new text begin ordinary negligence or new text end greater than ordinary negligence is against public policy and void and unenforceable.

The agreement, or portion thereof, is severable from a release, limitation, or waiver of liability for damage, injuries, or death resulting from deleted text begin conduct that constitutes ordinary negligence or for deleted text end risks that are inherent in a particular activity.

EFFECTIVE DATE.

This section is effective August 1, 2019, and applies to agreements first signed or accepted on or after that date.

Without the defenses supplied by releases in Minnesota:

  • Insurance costs will skyrocket. After OR outlawed releases some premiums jumped 2.5 times.
  • Insurance for many activities will be impossible to find.
  • Either because of the costs or the lack of premium recreation business will close.
  • The first group of recreation businesses to go will be those serving kids. They get hurt easy, and their parents sue easy.
  • Minnesota courts will back log because the only defense available will be assumption of the risk. Assumption of the risk is determined in the vast majority of cases by the jury. Consequently, it will take years to get to trial and prove the injured plaintiff assumed the risk.

Do Something

Contact your Senator and Representative and tell them you are opposed to this bill. Do it by telephone and in writing.

Find other organizations, trade associations and the like and join with them to give them more power because they have more people they represent.

Explain the bill to your friends and neighbors, so they can voice their opinion. Encourage them to do so.

Become politically aware so you know what is going on with the legislature and how to fight bills like this.

What do you think? Leave a comment.

Copyright 2018 Recreation Law (720) 334 8529

If you like this let your friends know or post it on FB, Twitter or LinkedIn

If you are interested in having me write your release, fill out this Information Form and Contract and send it to me.

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Interesting decision only real defense was the Wyoming’s Recreation Safety Act, which provides little if any real defense.

Defendants are the company that booked the trip (Vail through Grand Teton Lodge Company) and the travel agent who booked the trip.

Rizas et. al. v. Vail Resorts, Inc.; et. al., 2009 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 139788

State: Wyoming

Plaintiff: Alexis R. Rizas, Individually and as the Personal Representative of the Wrongful Death Beneficiaries of John J. Rizas, deceased; John Friel, Individually and as the Personal Representative of the Wrongful Death Beneficiaries of Elizabeth A. Rizas, Deceased; Ronald J. Miciotto, as the Per-sonal Representative of the Wrongful Death Beneficiaries of Linda and Lewis Clark, Deceased; James Clark; Lawrence Wilson; and Joyce Wilson, Plaintiffs

Defendant: Vail Resorts, Inc.; Grand Teton Lodge Company; Tauck, Inc., a.k.a. Tauck World Discovery, Inc., a.k.a. Tauck Tours, Inc.

Plaintiff Claims: Negligence, Punitive damages

Defendant Defenses: Wyoming’s Recreation Safety Act

Holding: Mixed, mostly for the plaintiff

Year: 2009

Summary

Decision looks at the liability of the travel agency and the hotel that booked a rafting float trip where three people died. The only defenses of available were the Wyoming’s Recreation Safety Act which helped keep the lawsuit in Wyoming applying Wyoming law, but was ineffective in assisting in the defense of the lawsuit.

The rafting company is not part of this decision so probably the raft company settled with the defendants before the case was filed or this motion was heard.

Facts

Tauck is a corporation formed under the laws of New Jersey and primarily doing business in Connecticut. Stipulated Facts, Docket Entry 108. Tauck is in the business of selling tour packages to its clients, one of which in 2006 was a tour called the “Yellowstone & Grand Teton – North.” This tour began in Salt Lake City, Utah and ended in Rapid City, South Dakota. Id. The tour included a two-night stay at the Jackson Lake Lodge in the Grand Teton National Park, and the Lodge was operated by GTLC. GTLC is organized under the laws of Wyoming and operates within the Grand Teton National Park pursuant to a concessionaire agreement with the National Park Service. Among the services that GTLC offered its guests is a 10-mile float trip along the Snake River from Deadman’s Bar to the Moose Landing. Tauck’s 2006 promotional materials contains the following sentence: “Take a scenic ten-mile raft trip on the Snake River as it meanders through spectacular mountain scenery alive with wildlife, including moose, elk, deer, and many species of birds.”

On June 2, 2006, a tour group gathered at the Lodge at approximately 8:00 a.m. They traveled via several vans to the rafting launch site at Deadman’s Bar. The trip took approximately one hour. There the larger group was split into four smaller groups, one for each raft provided. Raft No. 1 was guided by Wayne Johnson, an employee of GTLC. The raft at issue, Raft No. 2, had 11 passengers: John Rizas, Elizabeth Rizas, Patricia Rizas, Linda Clark, James Clark, Lawrence “Bubba” Wilson, Joyce Wilson, Tom Rizas, Ruth Rizas, Jon Shaw, and Maria Urrutia. The raft guide was Daniel Hobbs, who was also a GTLC employee and had been for four years.

During the float trip, Raft No. 2 struck a log jam. The collision occurred in the Funnelcake channel, which was one of several braided channels of the river. The raft upended as a result and all passengers were thrown into the river. John Rizas, Elizabeth Rizas, and Linda Clark died as a result.

Analysis: making sense of the law based on these facts.

The first issue was a choice of laws (jurisdiction and venue) provision in the agreement with the travel agency Tauck, which stated venue was to be in Connecticut. The plaintiff was arguing that the case should be moved to Connecticut, which is odd, because the plaintiff’s filed the case to start in Wyoming. However, since they sued in Wyoming, the plaintiff is still arguing that Connecticut law should apply.

Tauck argued the choice of law provisions was for its benefit, and it had the right to waive that provision in the agreement. The court found that Tauck had the right to waive a provision in the agreement that was there for its benefit.

In Wyoming, a contract must be construed according to the law of the place where it was made. There is no evidence indicating where the contract at issue was formed, but that makes little difference because the law of waiver of contract provisions is widespread and well accepted. “A party to a contract may waive a provision of the contract that was included for his benefit.”

The court held that the provision was for Tauck’s benefit because the living plaintiffs were residents of Georgia and Louisiana.

The court also stated, even it had not found for Tauck on this issue this way; it would have still used Wyoming law because of Wyoming’s strong public policy of recreational immunity.

Even if Tauck had not waived its right to enforce the choice-of-law provision, this Court would not enforce this provision due to Wyoming’s strong public policy of recreational immunity. Plaintiffs seek application of Connecticut law largely to avoid the effects of. The Court will discuss the Act in detail below; it is sufficient here to note that the Act provides a near-total elimination liability of a recreation provider where a person is injured because of an “inherent risk” of a recreational activity. River floating is specifically named as a qualifying recreational activity. Consequently, Plaintiffs seek application of Connecticut law because Connecticut is not so protective of its recreational providers as Wyoming.

Choice of law provisions are usually upheld by the courts; however, there are ways to get around them as this court explained.

The tour members and Tauck agreed that Connecticut law would apply, and Connecticut has a significant connection to the contract because of Tauck’s operation there. Nevertheless, Wyoming’s interest in the resolution of this issue is significantly greater because important Wyoming policy concerns are involved in the question of whether a provider of recreation opportunities should be subject to liability for injury from inherent risks. Absent a Connecticut plaintiff, Connecticut has no interest in whether a Wyoming corporation is held liable. Indeed, Connecticut’s interest in this case, if any, is probably more closely aligned with Tauck, which operates in that state.

The Court’s analysis is further informed by the fact that that Wyoming’s public policy in this matter is a strong one. Initially, the Act was less protective of recreation service providers, defining an “inherent risk” as “any risk that is characteristic of or intrinsic to any sport or recreational opportunity and which cannot reasonably be eliminated, altered or controlled.” In 1996, the Wyoming Legislature eliminated the clause, “and which cannot reasonably be eliminated, altered or controlled.” Subsequent to the amendment, this Court recognized the extraordinary protection offered to recreation providers in Wyoming:

Given this extraordinary protection, this Court must conclude that the Wyoming Legislature views immunity for recreation providers to be an important state interest. Wyoming law should apply in this case.

The court then reviewed the Wyoming’s Recreation Safety Act. The plaintiff’s argued the Wyoming’s Recreation Safety Act did not apply for three reasons.

First, they contend that Connecticut law applies–an argument that the Court has already resolved in favor of Defendants.

Second, Plaintiffs argue that Tauck is not a “provider” as defined in the Act.

Third, they assert that federal law preempts the Act.

The court found the first argument was already resolved in its analysis of jurisdiction above.

The second argument was the Wyoming’s Recreation Safety Act did not apply to the defendant Tauck, because it was a travel agent in Connecticut and not a “provider” as defined under the act. The court found that Tauck was a provider under the act because as part of its package. Provider is defined as “[A]ny person or governmental entity which for profit or otherwise offers or conducts a sport or recreational opportunity.”

The final issue was the argument that the state law was pre-empted by federal law. The argument was based on the concessionaire agreement the defendant had with the NPS. Although the concession agreement with the NPS provided for visitor safety, there was nothing in the agreement showing intent to pre-empt the Wyoming’s Recreation Safety Act.

The court then looked to see if the Wyoming’s Recreation Safety Act provided a defense in this case. The court first defined Inherent Risk under Wyoming law.

‘Inherent risk’ with regard to any sport or recreational opportunity means those dangerous conditions which are characteristic of, intrinsic to, or an integral part of any sport or recreational opportunity.”

[As you can see, the definition of inherent risk is not a broad definition it narrowly defines the risks to those intrinsic or integral to the activity. That leaves out thousands of risks created by man such as steering the raft, water releases, choosing the run, etc. which are probably not protected by the act.]

Outside of the inherent risks, to thwart the act, the plaintiff only needs to argue the risk was not inherent and the case would proceed to trial because the Wyoming’s Recreation Safety Act does not provide a defense to any risk not inherent in the sport. Because the court could not determine what risks were inherent what were not, it held the Wyoming’s Recreation Safety Act did not apply in this case.

In any case, this Court is bound to apply Sapone. Plaintiffs have submitted evidence that tends to show that the river, on the day of the river float trip, was running higher and faster so as to result in an activity with some greater risk to the participants. In addition, Plaintiffs submitted evidence suggesting that this stretch of river was generally believed to be a dangerous one. Specifically, a National Park Service publication entitled “Floating the Snake River” states that the area from Deadman’s Bar to Moose Landing “is the most challenging stretch of river in the park, and most accidents occur here. The river drops more steeply, with faster water than in other sections south of Pacific Creek. Complex braiding obscures the main channel, and strong currents can sweep boaters into side channels blocked by logjams.” Id. This evidence is not uncontested, of course, but it is sufficient to preclude summary judgment on this issue. The Court finds that there is a genuine issue of material fact regarding whether colliding with the log jam was an inherent risk of the river float trip undertaken by the tour members on June 2, 2006.

The court moved on to Tauck’s motion for summary judgment because as a tour agency is was not liable for the negligent acts of third parties, it dealt with. The law supports that argument. “As a general rule, a tour operator is not liable for injuries caused by the negligence of third parties over which the tour operator did not exercise ownership or control.”

However, that general rules does not apply if a contract with the travel agency or marketing state the travel agency will undertake a duty. (Always remember Marketing makes Promises Risk Management has to Pay for.)

Here the court found the promotional materials were marketing and did not rise to the level to be promises to be kept.

The plaintiff also argued Tauck took on a greater duty to the guests when it undertook the duty to have the guests sign the defendant GTLC’s acknowledgment of risk forms. That duty included duty to inform the guests of the risk associated with river rafting. However, the court could find nothing in Tauck’s action indicating it was accepting a greater duty when it handed out the assumption of the risk forms.

The plaintiff’s created a fraud argument. Under Montana’s law:

To prove fraud, the plaintiff must show by clear and convincing evidence that (1) the defendant made a false representation intended to induce action by the plaintiff; (2) the plaintiff reasonably believed the representation to be true; and (3) the plaintiff suffered damages in relying upon the false representation

The plaintiff’s argued that the defendants made all sorts of statements and advertising that the float trip was a leisurely scenic trip. The channel the raft guide took was not leisurely but was a dangerous channel by some authorities. However, the issue was, did the defendants intentionally made the statements about the river to induce the plaintiffs to the trip.

The defendants wanted the plaintiff’s claim for punitive damages dismissed. In Wyoming, punitive damages appear to be a claim much like negligence. The punitive damages claim was based on the same allegations that the fraud claim was made, that the defendants misrepresented the nature of the float trip.

Punitive damages in Wyoming are:

We have approved punitive damages in circumstances involving outrageous conduct, such as intention-al torts, torts involving malice and torts involving willful and wanton misconduct.” Willful and wanton misconduct is the intentional doing, or failing to do, an act in reckless disregard of the consequences and under circumstances and conditions that a reasonable person would know that such conduct would, in a high degree of probability, result in harm to another. “The aggravating factor which distinguishes willful misconduct from ordinary negligence is the actor’s state of mind. In order to prove that an actor has engaged in willful misconduct, one must demonstrate that he acted with a state of mind that approaches intent to do harm.”

Failing to advise the plaintiffs that the river was running higher than normal because of the spring run off did not rise to a level to be reckless and willful misconduct. The one channel of several the one guide went down was a negligent decision, not a willful one.

So Now What?

Fairly simple, use a release. It would have stopped this lawsuit sooner. If the outfitter would have used a release, it could have protected the lodge and the travel agent. I’m sure the lodge is going to use one now, which will probably just muddy the water because of multiple releases and defendants.

There are very few statutes that provide any real protection in the outdoor recreation industry. Most, in fact, make it easier for the plaintiffs to win. The exception to the rule is a few of the Ski Area Safety Statutes.

Be prepared and do more than rely on a week statute.

What do you think? Leave a comment.

Copyright 2018 Recreation Law (720) 334 8529

If you like this let your friends know or post it on FB, Twitter or LinkedIn

If you are interested in having me write your release, fill out this Information Form and Contract and send it to me.

Author: Outdoor Recreation Insurance, Risk Management and Law

To Purchase Go Here:

Facebook Page: Outdoor Recreation & Adventure Travel Law

Email: Rec-law@recreation-law.com

By Recreation Law    Rec-law@recreation-law.com    James H. Moss

#AdventureTourism, #AdventureTravelLaw, #AdventureTravelLawyer, #AttorneyatLaw, #Backpacking, #BicyclingLaw, #Camps, #ChallengeCourse, #ChallengeCourseLaw, #ChallengeCourseLawyer, #CyclingLaw, #FitnessLaw, #FitnessLawyer, #Hiking, #HumanPowered, #HumanPoweredRecreation, #IceClimbing, #JamesHMoss, #JimMoss, #Law, #Mountaineering, #Negligence, #OutdoorLaw, #OutdoorRecreationLaw, #OutsideLaw, #OutsideLawyer, #RecLaw, #Rec-Law, #RecLawBlog, #Rec-LawBlog, #RecLawyer, #RecreationalLawyer, #RecreationLaw, #RecreationLawBlog, #RecreationLawcom, #Recreation-Lawcom, #Recreation-Law.com, #RiskManagement, #RockClimbing, #RockClimbingLawyer, #RopesCourse, #RopesCourseLawyer, #SkiAreas, #Skiing, #SkiLaw, #Snowboarding, #SummerCamp, #Tourism, #TravelLaw, #YouthCamps, #ZipLineLawyer, #RecreationLaw, #OutdoorLaw, #OutdoorRecreationLaw, #SkiLaw, 


Texas appellate court upholds release for claims of gross negligence in trampoline accident that left plaintiff a paraplegic.

However, the decision is not reasoned and supported in Texas by other decisions or the Texas Supreme Court.

Quiroz et. al. v. Jumpstreet8, Inc., et. al., 2018 Tex. App. LEXIS 5107

State: Texas, Court of Appeals of Texas, Fifth District, Dallas

Plaintiff: Graciela Quiroz, Individually, a/n/f of Xxxx (“John Doe 1”) and Xxxx (“John Doe 2”), Minors, and Robert Sullivan, Individually, a/n/f of Xxxx (“John Doe 3”)

Defendant: Jumpstreet8, Inc., Jumpstreet, Inc. and Jumpstreet Construction, Inc.

Plaintiff Claims: negligence and gross negligence and as next friend of two minor children for their loss of parental consortium and their bystander claims for mental anguish.

Defendant Defenses: Release

Holding: for the Defendant

Year: 2018

Summary

Adult paralyzed in a trampoline facility sues for her injuries. The release she signed before entering stopped all of her claims, including her claim for gross negligence.

However, the reasoning behind the support for the release to stop the gross negligence claim was not in the decision, so this is a tenuous decision at best.

Facts

The plaintiff and her sixteen-year-old son went to the defendant’s business. Before entering she signed a release. While on a trampoline, the plaintiff attempted to do a back flip, landed on her head and was rendered a paraplegic from the waist down.

The plaintiff sued on her behalf and on behalf of her minor. Her claim was a simple tort claim for negligence. Her children’s claims were based on the loss of parental consortium and under Texas law bystander claims for seeing the accident or seeing their mother suffer. The plaintiff’s husband also joined in the lawsuit later for his loss of consortium claims.

The defendant filed a motion for summary judgment which the trial court granted and the plaintiff appealed.

Analysis: making sense of the law based on these facts.

The original entity named on the release was a corporation that was no longer in existence. Several successor entities now owned and controlled the defendant. The plaintiff argued the release did not protect them because the release only spoke to the one defendant.

The court did not agree, finding language in the release that stated the release applied to all “jumpstreet entities that engaged in the trampoline business.”

…it also stated the Release equally applied to “its parent, subsidiaries, affiliates, other related entities, successors, owners, members, directors, officers, shareholders, agents, employees, servants, assigns, investors, legal representatives and all individuals and entities involved in the operation of Jumpstreet.”

The next argument was whether the release met the requirements on Texas law for a release. The court pointed out bold and capital letters were used to point out important parts of the release. An assumption of the risk section was separate and distance from the release of liability section, and the release warned people to read the document carefully before signing.

Texas also has an express negligence rule, the requirements of which were also met by the way the release was written.

Further, on page one in the assumption of risk paragraphs, the person signing the Release acknowledges the “potentially hazardous activity,” and the Release lists possible injuries including “but not limited to” sprains, heart attack, and even death. Although paralysis is not specifically named as an injury, it is certainly less than death and thus would be included within the “but not limited to” language. Also, the release of liability paragraph above Quiroz’s signature expressly lists the types of claims and causes of action she is waiving, including “negligence claims, gross negligence claims, personal injury claims, and mental anguish claims.

Next the plaintiff argued that the release covered her and her sixteen-year-old minor son. As such the release should be void because it attempted to cover a minor and releases in Texas do not work for minors.

The court ignored this argument stating it was not the minor who was hurt and suing; it was the plaintiff who was an adult. The court then also added that the other plaintiffs were also covered under the release because all of their claims, loss of parental consortium and loss of consortium are derivative claims. Meaning they only succeed if the plaintiff s claim succeeds.

The final argument was the plaintiff plead negligence and gross negligence in her complaint. A release in Texas, like most other states, was argued by the plaintiff to not be valid.

The appellate court did not see that argument as clearly. First, the Texas Supreme Court had not reviewed that issue. Other appellate courts have held that there is no difference in Texas between a claim for negligence and a claim for gross negligence.

The Texas Supreme Court has not ruled on whether a pre-injury release as to gross negligence is against public policy when there is no assertion that intentional, deliberate, or reckless acts cause injury. Some appellate courts have held that negligence, and gross negligence are not separable claims and a release of liability for negligence also releases a party from liability for gross negligence.

(For other arguments like this see In Nebraska a release can defeat claims for gross negligence for health club injury.)

The court looked at the release which identified negligence and gross negligence as claims that the release would stop.

Quiroz’s Release specifically stated that both negligence and gross negligence claims were waived. The assumption of risk paragraph that lists the specific types of claims/causes of actions that were included in the Release was encased in a box, had all capital lettering, and appeared above the signature line. As noted above, Quiroz received fair notice regarding the claims being waived.

Although not specifically writing in the opinion why the release stopped the gross negligence claims, the court upheld the release for all the plaintiff claims.

…Quiroz’s Release specifically stated that both negligence and gross negligence claims were waived. The assumption of risk paragraph that lists the specific types of claims/causes of actions that were included in the Release was encased in a box, had all capital lettering, and appeared above the signature line. As noted above, Quiroz received fair notice regarding the claims being waived.

The court affirmed the trial court’s dismissal of the plaintiff’s claims.

So Now What?

First this case is a great example of believing that once you have a release you don’t have to do anything else. If the defendant’s release would have been checked every year, someone should have noticed that the named entity to be protected no longer existed.

In this case that fact did not become a major issue, however, in other states the language might not have been broad enough to protect everyone.

Second, this case is also proof that being specific with possible risks of the activities and have an assumption of risk section pays off.

Finally, would I go out and pronounce that Texas allows a release to stop claims for gross negligence. No. Finger’s crossed until the Texas Supreme Court rules on the issue or another appellate court in Texas provides reasoning for its argument, this is thin support for that statement.

What do you think? Leave a comment.

Copyright 2017 Recreation Law (720) 334 8529

If you like this let your friends know or post it on FB, Twitter or LinkedIn

If you are interested in having me write your release, fill out this Information Form and Contract and send it to me.

Author: Outdoor Recreation Insurance, Risk Management and Law

To Purchase Go Here:

Facebook Page: Outdoor Recreation & Adventure Travel Law

Email: Rec-law@recreation-law.com

By Recreation Law    Rec-law@recreation-law.com    James H. Moss

#AdventureTourism, #AdventureTravelLaw, #AdventureTravelLawyer, #AttorneyatLaw, #Backpacking, #BicyclingLaw, #Camps, #ChallengeCourse, #ChallengeCourseLaw, #ChallengeCourseLawyer, #CyclingLaw, #FitnessLaw, #FitnessLawyer, #Hiking, #HumanPowered, #HumanPoweredRecreation, #IceClimbing, #JamesHMoss, #JimMoss, #Law, #Mountaineering, #Negligence, #OutdoorLaw, #OutdoorRecreationLaw, #OutsideLaw, #OutsideLawyer, #RecLaw, #Rec-Law, #RecLawBlog, #Rec-LawBlog, #RecLawyer, #RecreationalLawyer, #RecreationLaw, #RecreationLawBlog, #RecreationLawcom, #Recreation-Lawcom, #Recreation-Law.com, #RiskManagement, #RockClimbing, #RockClimbingLawyer, #RopesCourse, #RopesCourseLawyer, #SkiAreas, #Skiing, #SkiLaw, #Snowboarding, #SummerCamp, #Tourism, #TravelLaw, #YouthCamps, #ZipLineLawyer, #RecreationLaw, #OutdoorLaw, #OutdoorRecreationLaw, #SkiLaw,


UIAA Newsletter_5 July 2018: Preservation of Natural Rock, style=’font-size:11.5pt;font-family:”Georgia”,serif;color:black’>2018 UIAA Rock Climbing Festival Award, and More

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The UIAA newsletter.
5 July 2018
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The UIAA Newsletter. 5 July 2018

In Brief

The 2018 UIAA Respect the Mountains Series commences this weekend with two events taking place in Italy. The application process for the UIAA’s other annual core project in sustainability – the Mountain Protection Award – closed on 30 June with over 20 project submissions received from 17 countries. At both the 2018 Sustainable Summits Conference and Outdoor2018, the UIAA played a key role in discussions related to the future of the mountains. UIAA member federations, delegates and partners are informed that the Calling Notice for the 2018 UIAA General Assembly was published on 30 June. Registration opens next week.

Next Newsletter – Week of 23 July.
Key topics: 2018 UIAA Rock Climbing Festival Award, UIAA Safety Standards

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NATURAL ROCK FOR ADVENTURE CLIMBING:
FRESH CONCERNSAs part of its commitment to raising awareness about the importance of preserving natural rock and to reducing indiscriminate bolting, the UIAA is sharing an article from Norwegian climber Robert Caspersen concerning an expedition made in late 2017 with three friends to climb the high east face of Gessnertind (3020m) in Antarctica.

The article was brought to the UIAA’s attention by former UIAA Management Committee member and legendary mountaineer Doug Scott, who spearheaded the UIAA’s seminal paper on ‘UIAA Recommendations on the Preservation of Natural Rock for Adventure Climbing’ in 2014. The paper evaluated the history and appeal of different forms of rock climbing, and considered earlier attitudes to fixed gear. It also considered how the case for adventure climbing can be re-stated more effectively and offered guidance to UIAA member federations in developing countries on how to sustain the balance between sport and adventure climbing

“Thearticle written by Robert Caspersen is exceptionally inspiring and cannot fail, I am sure, to move people towards at least thinking of restricting the use of the bolt,” explains Scott. Full Story.

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LAUNCH:
2019 UIAA ICE CLIMBING WORLD TOUR CALENDARThe UIAA is delighted to confirm the calendar for the 2019 Ice Climbing World Tour. Comprising a comprehensive and impressive programme of events, the 2019 calendar is the biggest to date and includes six World Cup events, four European Cups, a World Championships, a World Combined Championships and a World Youth Championships. The World Tour will visit ten different countries on three continents and features two events taking place in major cities – Moscow and Denver. Full story.

Athletes, officials and member federations are informed that the Competition Regulations for the 2019 UIAA Ice Climbing World Tour are also available. Full story.

LATEST NEWS FROM
UIAA MEMBER FEDERATIONS & PARTNERSShare your news with the UIAA by emailing news

ALPINE CLUB OF CANADA
Mountain Science, Climate Change & Education
2018 State of the Mountains Report

ALPINE CLUB OF PAKISTAN
The Alpine Club of Pakistan have confirmed Mr. Abu Zafar Sadiq as President and Mr.Karar Haidri as Secretary

AMERICAN ALPINE CLUB
Lending Climbers A Stronger Voice

ASIAN ALPINE ASSOCIATES
Latest newsletter now available

BRITISH MOUNTAINEERING COUNCIL
Lynn Robinson becomes the BMC’s first-ever female president.

DEUTSCHER ALPENVEREIN, DAV
Climbing Safety Video Series Now Available

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2018 UIAA MOUNTAIN PROTECTION AWARD:
APPLICATION CLOSESThe UIAA Mountain Protection Commission confirms that as of 30 June, the application process for the 2018 UIAA Mountain Protection Award is now closed. The sixth edition of the Award has welcomed over 20 applicants from some 17 countries. The Award Assessment Team are currently reviewing all applications. Projects accepted for the 2018 Award will be contacted in due course. Showcased projects will be uploaded to the UIAA website during the month of July. The winning project will be announced at the 2018 UIAA General Assembly held in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia on 6 October. Full story.
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UIAA SHAPING DISCUSSIONS
AT SUSTAINABLE SUMMITS AND OUTDOOR 2018 Two major international gatherings for the outdoor community took place in June 2018 with the UIAA represented, and leading discussions, at both events. First, the biennial Sustainable Summits Conference took place in Chamonix, France from 12-14 June where the three-day discussions focused on the future for the world’s high mountains. A week after the Sustainable Summits conference, the UIAA was represented at OutDoor, the world’s leading trade fair in the industry which took place in Friedrichshafen, Germany from 17-20 June. Full story.
RECENT ARTICLES

A reminder of some other recent articles published by the UIAA:

SAFETY:
Safety Standards / Support UIAA SafeCom Research:
Submit Examples of Climbing Anchor Corrosion

Safety Label Holder / Skylotec precautionary call for inspection check of Via Ferrata sets
MedCom / Medical Advice for Women Going to Altitude

SKILLS:
Alpine Series / What Weakens A Rope?
Alpine Series / Gear: Single & multi pitch check list

SUSTAINABILITY:
RTM / 2018 UIAA Respect the Mountains Series: Dates Announced

IN MEMORY

The UIAA is sad to hear about the recent passing of two pioneering figures in the world of climbing and mountaineering. Suk-Ha Hong, who died on 29 May, was an influential presence in Korean mountaineering. Among his legacies are the creation of Man and Mountain magazine and his role in the foundation of Asia’s Piolets d’Or. Suk-Ha Hong was awarded “Order of Civil Merit” by the Korean Government in 2008 for his devotion to mountaineering culture.

On 20 June, elite ice climber and French guide Stéphane Husson was involved in an accident in the Alps and died in hospital the following day. A 16-year old climber was killed in the same accident. Husson played a pivotal role in the development of competition ice climbing in France. Further details.

UPCOMING EVENTS
8 July
RESPECT THE MOUNTAINS
Passo della Focolaccia, Italy
8 July
RESPECT THE MOUNTAINS
Molise, Italy
22 July
RESPECT THE MOUNTAINS
Snowdonia National Park, Wales
23-30 July
UIAA YOUTH MOUNTAINEERING SCHOOL
Mount Kazbek, Georgia
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The UIAA was founded in 1932 and represents over 90 member associations in 68 countries. The organization’s mission is to promote the growth and protection of climbing and mountaineering worldwide, advance safe and ethical mountain practices and promote responsible access, culture and environmental protection.

The organization operates through the work of its commissions which make recommendations, set policy and advocate on behalf of the climbing and mountaineering community. The UIAA is recognized by the International Olympic Committee (IOC).

UIAA OFFICE
c/o Schweizer Alpen-Club SAC
Monbijoustrasse 61 Postfach CH-3000
Bern 14, Switzerland
Tel: +41 (0)31 370 1828news

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UIAA Newsletter_December 2017

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The UIAA newsletter. December 2017
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The UIAA. Newsletter. December 2017.
Welcome to the latest UIAA newsletter.

During the month of November, the UIAA played a leading role in mountain sustainability discussions at both the International Federation Forum in Lausanne and in Bonn during the 23rd United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) – COP23. Ahead of 11 December’s International Mountain Day (IMD) titled ‘Mountains under Pressure: climate, hunger, migration’, the UIAA invites its member federations to share news of their IMD activities with news. The UIAA Ice Climbing season starts this weekend as the countdown to January’s World Cup series gains momentum. Meanwhile, application for the 2018 UIAA Rock Climbing awards is open and the UIAA MedCom shares advice for gap year and charity-event travellers.
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INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION FORUM
UIAA’S INTEGRAL ROLE IN SUSTAINABILITY DISCUSSIONSOn 9 November, the UIAA took part in a panel discussion at Sport Accord’s International Federation Forum (IF) in Lausanne, Switzerland discussing the relationship between sport and biodiversity and the role of the sporting community. The theme of the three day conference was the International Federations’ Impact In Leading The Way To Towards A Sustainability Agenda. The IF Forum programme is a collaboration between the International Olympic Committee (IOC), the Global Association of International Sport Federations (GAISF), the Association of Summer International Federations (ASOIF), the Association of Winter Olympic Federations (AIOWF),the Association of the IOC Recognized International Sports Federations (ARISF), AIMS (Alliance of Independent Members of SportAccord) and Associate Members. Full story here
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2018 UIAA ROCK CLIMBING FESTIVAL AWARD
APPLICATION OPEN

The international rock climbing community is informed that application for the 2018 UAA Rock Climbing Festival Award is now open. The annual Award was created in 2015 and is granted to the festival which best demonstrates a commitment to safety, sustainability and the development of rock climbing as a sport. The chosen festival is selected from a shortlist of applicants and chosen by the UIAA Rock Climbing Working Group. To date, Award winners have come from Africa (South Africa, 2015), Europe (Greece, 2016) and North America (USA, 2017). Please note, for 2018 the UIAA is inviting applications from festivals held in South America. Full story here.

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FEDME’S MOUNTAIN SAFETY COMMITMENT
SPANISH FEDERATION MAKING IMPRESSIVE STRIDESOver last few years, FEDME (Federación Española de Deportes de Montaña y Escalada), a full UIAA member, has reinforced its commitment to mountain safety, introducing a number of innovative and extensive measures to expand knowledge and consciousness about mountain safety on national level. One of their recent successes saw the publication of a detailed report about tests carried out on anchors in the marine environment. Here is their story.Full story here.
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In collaboration with Mountain Partnership, the UIAA took part in a side event discussion during COP23, titled “Implementing the 2030 Agenda & Paris Agreement in mountains: building a Framework for Action” during COP23. A video replay of the side panel discussion is embedded (starting at 7:15.00)

Organized by Mountain Partnership, the Government of Kyrgyzstan and the UIAA, the panel explored common challenges and solutions for addressing climate change impacts in mountains during the event, supporting concrete actions, putting in place long-lasting processes and establishing policies that strengthen the resilience of mountain peoples and environments. The UIAA was represented by Mountain Protection Commission delegate Joop Spijker (NKBC, Netherlands). He addressed the subject of mountaineering and climate change. UIAA Honorary Member Ang Tshering Sherpa (NMA, Nepal) also took part introducing ‘Community Experience of the Climate Change in the Himalayas and Solutions’.

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2018 UIAA ICE CLIMBING SEASON
IMPORTANT UPDATES

The first event of the new UIAA Ice Climbing season starts this weekend in Domzale (Slovenia), a perfect opportunity for young athletes to develop their skills and senior campaigners to prepare for the UIAA Ice Climbing World Tour in January.

The following links provide useful information about the 2018 season.
Latest Updates – including final calendar
A guide to the European Cups
Athletes’ Handbook
Rules & Regulations
UIAA & Ice Climbing

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HOW TO CHECK THE QUALITY OF A COMMERCIALLY ORGANISED TREK OR EXPEDITION
LATEST UIAA MEDCOM ADVICE

This, the sixth article in the UIAA’s series dedicated to high-altitude medical advice, has a very clear target audience, principally trekking or expedition company operators and their potential clients, notably those on gap years, round the world tickets or taking part in charity events.

As the number of mountaineers who are joining organised treks or expeditions continues to increase, so does the incidence of altitude-related diseases. Technically simple high altitude treks and peaks with easy access such as Kilimanjaro, Aconcagua, or the Everest trek (with fly-in to Lukla) are still potentially dangerous because of the rapid ascent profile undertaken by many trekkers and/or offered by numerous trekking companies. Full story here.

FROM THE UIAA NEWSROOM

Following on from October’s UIAA General Assembly, the UIAA Access Commission led a mountain workshop in Tehran. Angelika Rainer, one of the stars of the UIAA Ice Climbing World Tour recently made history. Hohhot is confirmed as the venue for the Chinese leg of the 2018 UIAA Ice Climbing World Tour. Registration for two 2018 UIAA youth camps in France – part of the Global Youth Summit series – is now open.

UPCOMING EVENTS
2 December
ICE CLIMBING – EUROPEAN CUP
Domzale, Slovenia
9 December
ICE CLIMBING – EUROPEAN CUP
Bratislava, Slovakia
11 December
INTERNATIONAL MOUNTAIN DAY
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The UIAA was founded in 1932 and has 92 member associations in 68 countries representing about 3 million climbers and mountaineers. The organization’s mission is to promote the growth and protection of climbing and mountaineering worldwide, advance safe and ethical mountain practices and promote responsible access, culture and environmental protection.

The organization operates through the work of its commissions which make recommendations, set policy and advocate on behalf of the climbing and mountaineering community. The UIAA is recognized by the International Olympic Committee (IOC).

You received this message as a subscriber to the UIAA monthly newsletter.

UIAA OFFICE
c/o Schweizer Alpen-Club SAC
Monbijoustrasse 61 Postfach CH-3000
Bern 14, Switzerland
Tel: +41 (0)31 370 1828

news

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UIAA Updates: If you are a Rock Climber or Mountaineer this Great Organization is part of your Life.

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Welcome to UIAA Newsletter – November 2015
Issue No. 0

Everest2.jpg UIAA Statement regarding Proposed Restrictions on Mount Everest

The UIAA fully supports the decision by Nepalese authorities to propose more stringent measures for climbers wishing to scale the world’s highest peak, Mount Everest (29,029ft / 8,848m). These measures will include individuals having to prove they have already scaled a peak in excess of 6,500m, eliminating the possibility of novice climbers scaling the mountain. Read More

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Member Federations
IMG_7379_Marco-Frattini.jpg Join the UIAA in supporting the World Food Programme and Nepal Mountaineering Association’s response in Nepal
Following the April earthquake that shook Nepal and left thousands of people stranded in remote locations beyond the access of roads and helicopters, the World Food Programme (WFP) set up a Remote Access Operation to reach survivors with life-saving food, medicine and shelter. … Read More
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Safety
bolt.jpg New Download: UIAA Warning About Climbing Anchor Failures
The UIAA Safety Commission has produced an extensive document ‘Watch Your Anchor! Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Cracking Failure of Climbing Anchors’. … Read More
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Sustainability
test2.jpg The UIAA integrates Respect the Mountains
The UIAA is delighted to announce the extension of its activities in mountain preservation through the recent addition of the Respect the Mountains campaign. … Read More
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General Assembly
LEA_4284.jpg Images: 2015 UIAA General Assembly
Member federations can access the photo library from the 2015 UIAA General by accessing the UIAA Flickr account at the following link. … Read More
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Mountain Protection
MPA15_banner.jpg 2015 UIAA Mountain Protection Award Winner
KTK-BELT Studio joins impressive list of UIAA Mountain Protection Award recipients … Read More
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Competition Sports
herndon_ben_bif17_UIAAnewsletter-6.jpg Confirmation: UIAA Ice Climbing Event in Bozeman, Montana goes ahead
The UIAA informs member federations, athletes and the ice climbing community that the 2016 UIAA Ice Climbing World Tour season opener in Bozeman, Montana scheduled for 11-12 December will go ahead as planned. … Read More
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Youth
IYCI_Italy1.png Registration for 2016 International Youth Ice Climbing Camp (Italy) open
Information is now available – and registration open – for the 2016 International Youth Climbing Camp in Italy. … Read More
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Guillestre-region-IMG_3686.jpg 2016 International Youth Ice Climbing Camp (France) registration open
Full details about February’s International Youth Ice Climbing camp in France are now available. … Read More
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10 – 12 December 2015
UIAA Ice Climbing World Cup & NA Championships
Bozeman, MT. USA16 – 17 January 2016
UIAA Ice Climbing World Cup & Asian Championships
Cheongsong. Korea

22 – 23 January 2016
UIAA Ice Climbing World Cup
Saas Fee

29 – 31 January 2016
UIAA Ice Climbing World Cup
Rabenstein

06 – 07 February 2016
UIAA World Youth Championships – Rabenstein
Rabenstein

06 – 10 February 2016
International Youth Ice Climbing Camp
Valle Varaita (Cuneo)

See full calendar

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UIAA – International Climbing and Mountaineering Federation

Monbijoustrasse 61 Postbach CH-3000 Bern 23 Switzerland


AMGA Terrain and Supervision Guidelines? Making more rules does not make things safer. Rarely does that work, look at the laws concerning our highways and the highway deaths. Making more rules does lead to more lawsuits. Again, look at our highways.

The latest actions of AMGA hit a lot of nerves and rightfully so. As usual, the lack of understanding and the desire to create something (not sure what) labeled standards are going to create lawsuits. The new Terrain & Supervision Guidelines won’t solve any problems; they’ll only create new ones.

I’ve attached the new requirements here below, so you can review them yourself. If not, you can download your own set here: Terrain & Supervision Guidelines. I’m not sure why the AMGA has created the new requirements. I’ve been told it is a money thing, I’ve been told it is a safety thing, I’ve been told it is a back door into trying to get permits on NPS lands; I have no real idea. I do know it won’t accomplish any of those goals. I did not contact the AMGA to find out what or why.

Attorneys love to deal in fuzzy it gives them latitude to litigate. The only time they don’t like fuzzy is when something is solid and proves their case without having to work very hard. The new Terrain & Supervision Guidelines are the classic sharp line to help prove the defendant was wrong and everything else is fuzzy so no one really knows how to help the defendant.

Let me reminisce.

I quit providing pro bono legal work to the AMGA over fifteen years ago when another attorney said he could get the AMGA into national parks. I told the AMGA that would never happen. I moved on. Fifteen years later and at least two attorneys failing to pull AMGA guides into parks, the AMGA might be going around to the back door believing the back door will open.

Back doors meaning the NPS employees in individual parks who lead the rescues have to deal with the current concessionaires; who they don’t like (familiarity breed’s contempt). It is always easier to like someone who is sucking up in the belief; you can get them in a park to guide.

The problem is the door is not at any park; the door is in Washington DC no matter what the AMGA wants to believe. It doesn’t start at 1849 C St NW, Washington, DC 20240, the Department of the Interior address, either, but at Congress. Congress made the laws the NPS, and the USFS are enforcing on commercial guides on Federal lands. Until the AMGA can raise millions, probably $10 million dollars to lobby Congress, nothing will even look like it is going to change. And I suspect that the $10 million is not enough because the current companies that own permits and concessions will lobby against it, and they are bigger. Remember the big hotel concessions in the parks also run raft trips, trail rides and work with climbing guides.

However, I’ve also been told that the AMGA has backed off from the position that AMGA guides should be allowed to guide in National Parks.

I have found some legal disasters in the new Terrain & Supervision Guidelines.

The guidelines won’t apply to staff hired prior to 2008. An arbitrary number I guess, or probably the number when the last member of the committee became certified and was hired. I sat through board meetings when the first date of guides to be grandfathered under the UIAGM was determined. It was ugly, funny and basically a turf war. Trial attorneys will tear this up. (How come Guide X made it and Guide Y did not. Guide Y has thousands of year’s more recent experience, and Guide X has not been on a mountain since 08?)

The guidelines require that everything has to be documented “in the guide’s personnel file.” Thank heavens the AMGA has reviewed all HR laws in the US and knows this will not create problems. If personal files are paper, then you better get accordion files. To back this up, you’ll have to collect all the information supporting the requirements in the guidelines first, and then add the review of the supervising guides and the evaluations. Weather conditions, snow conditions, terrain maps, route maps, etc., can take a lot of space in a file folder.

My favorite rule is one that requires a guide who has not made the qualifications yet, must be under the direct supervision of a guide who has met the qualifications. Unless the guide, who has met the qualifications, has to take guests down the mountain, then the two guides can be in radio contact. The rules allow the least experienced guide to remain up high, alone.

Direct Supervision: Direct supervision implies side by side guiding such as two rope teams traveling near by on a glacier or on nearby multi-pitch routes, daily briefings and debriefings about route selection, strategy, and client care. Side by side guiding and meetings should be documented in the guide’s personnel file. It is the supervising guide’s responsibility to ensure that assigned tasks are appropriate to a guide’s training and ability. It is allowable for the mentored guide to be in radio or phone contact when turning around with clients to descend.

What if the guide who has been certified, leaves to summit with a group of clients, can the one who hasn’t been certified stay with the clients who don’t/can’t summit. They’ll be in radio contact?

So you make a rule, then you make an exception to the rule. On Denali in a few years, this will be a disaster. The new concession requirements for climbing concessions are going to reduce the number of guides with a commercial group. Rescues will be done without commercial guides because a guide won’t be able to leave the group and work the rescue with these guidelines. (Rescues in the future on Denali are going to be a mess with the latest version of the commercial rules anyway, that is a whole other article.)

The languages of the guidelines are full of legal land mines. Here are some of my favorites.

…who are appropriately trained, tenured or certified

It is the supervising guide’s responsibility to ensure that assigned tasks are appropriate to a guide’s training and ability.

Certified supervisors

…is not of wilderness in nature

My favorite are the terms applied to different people.

Apprentice Guide

Assistant Guide

Aspirant Mountain Guide

Certified Guide

So does that mean you are a patrol leader or a star scout? More importantly do you get a badge?

Here are some more phrases that seem innocuous but don’t make sense.

The stated goal of the new accreditation standard is to have all field staff, except those meeting the 2008 exemption, be trained by the AMGA for the terrain they work on.

So guides who met the requirements prior to 2008 cannot have a lick of training, sense or experience now and not be up to date on the requirements.

How is this going to happen? So I have a concession to guide on Denali. Am I supposed to bring you on one of my trips to tell me that you can train me on this terrain? What about the NPS on this issue and their current regulations. I guess you can come, go sign up and pay the fee, and I’ll take you where I am permitted to go.

AMGA courses are considered the baseline technical training for specific terrain types and are not a substitute for in-house training.

Yet above, they said this is the best you can get? What is this going to mean in court? The AMGA is just the baseline, yet the states the IFMGA (UIAGM) are now the baseline.

(The IFMGA (UIAGM) was founded to allow guides in Europe to guide everywhere and is the International Organization the AMGA must follow.)

I doubt that this has been run by the IFMGA (UIAGM).

Do Something

What’s going to happen? The big concessionaire members of the AMGA are either going to leave and financially sink the AMGA or revolt. No one will be happy either way. They don’t need greater chances of being sued. People die on mountains, and I would guess these new guidelines are not going to change that. They know the terrain and have in place, with NPS approval a way of guiding customers and training staff.

I have not taken the time to compare these guidelines with current NPS regulations for various mountains. I suspect there may be some conflicts. What is a concessionaire supposed to do, not follow the NPS and lose their permit or not follow these. Let’s see I pay money to the AMGA I make money with my NPS permit. Who am I going to follow?

These guidelines, like all standards for people, will only create a checklist for the attorney representing an injured client to sue. The guidelines will be taken and incorporated in interrogatories about each member of the guiding team. One misstep on the mountain or in discovery and these guidelines will change the lawsuit from what we can defend to how much we have to pay.

Don’t get me wrong. The American Mountain Guides Association has some of the greatest people I know as members and as an organization has accomplished tons. However, it is faced with an impossible job with no money to accomplish the job: the promise the AMGA made to the IFMGA in 1993 is never going to come through.

However, making standards, guidelines for people do not stop lawsuits; they only help the plaintiff’s win lawsuits.

Click on the link to download your own copy of the Terrain & Supervision Guidelines.

See the following articles where association guidelines were used to sue the association member:

ACA Standards are used by Expert for the Plaintiff in a lawsuit against a Camp                                       http://rec-law.us/zmKgoi

Great article about the risks of an organization creating standards for members of the industry – and I did not write it                                                                              http://rec-law.us/1rk8oHR

If your organization says you do something and you are a member of the organization you better do it or be able to explain why you did not                                   http://rec-law.us/1gOLpju

Expert Witness Report: ACA “Standards” are used by Expert for the Plaintiff in a lawsuit against a Camp            http://rec-law.us/y7QlJ3

Industry standards are proof of gross negligence and keep defendant in lawsuit even with good release            http://rec-law.us/1dqBdxo

Plaintiff uses standards of ACCT to cost defendant $4.7 million                   http://rec-law.us/11UdbEn

So if you write standards, you can, then use them to make money when someone sues your competitors            http://rec-law.us/1gCGce8

Trade Association Standards sink a Summer Camp when plaintiff uses them to prove Camp was negligent                                                                               http://rec-law.us/wszt7N

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International Mountain Guides has Trips All Over the World

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Prep For The Himalayas In Bolivia

Bolivia Team Summits Huayna Potosi
Summit day on Huayna Potosi

Is a high altitude mountain in your future? If so, there is no better training than our IMG Bolivia programs! Great weather, good access, spectacular climbing, challenging peaks…Bolivia has it all. Our July and August trips are filling up nicely, but we still have space available on both programs. Airline flights to La Paz are still reasonably priced right now. It’s a great time to put Bolivia on your calendar for next summer.


Commercial Summer Fatalities: 2014

Our condolences to the families of the deceased.

This list is not guaranteed to be accurate. The information is found from web searches and news dispatches. If you have a source for information on any fatality please leave a comment.

Whitewater fatalities are light blue

Medical fatalities are light red

This is up to date as of September 14, 2014

If this information is incorrect or incomplete please let me know. Thank You.

Date

State

Activity

Where

How

Outfitter or Guide Service

Sex

Home

Age

Source

Source

5/28

AZ

Whitewater Kayaking

Colorado River, Grand Canyon, Badger Rapid

Did not right his kayak

 

M

 

43

http://rec-law.us/SVpdfb

 

6/3

AZ

Whitewater Rafting

Colorado River, Grand Canyon

Allergic reaction

 

F

Seattle, WA

54

http://rec-law.us/1l4xk4K

 

6/7

CO

Whitewater Rafting

Clear Creek

Fell out of raft, possible respirator problems

 

M

Brighton, CO

41

http://rec-law.us/1uEp3Fc

http://rec-law.us/1rafOwq

6/10

CO

Whitewater Rafting

Arkansas River, Salt Lick

boat flipped or dump trucked

Royal Gorge Rafting

M

Enid, OK

48

http://rec-law.us/1spBsRI

http://rec-law.us/1niITC2

6/14

CO

Whitewater Rafting

Arkansas River, Royal Gorge

respiratory problems before he and five other rafters were tossed out

 

M

Colorado Springs, CO

44

http://rec-law.us/1nl63ZF

http://rec-law.us/1lXMEAj

6/16

CO

Whitewater Rafting

Roaring Fork river

Fell out of raft

Blazing Adventures

M

Denver, CO

44

http://rec-law.us/1lB7jey

 

6/27

ID

Whitewater Rafting

Salmon River, The Slide

Ejected from raft

Epley’s Whitewater Adventure

M

Poulsbo, WA

50

http://rec-law.us/1x79IAj

http://rec-law.us/1qPcLds

7/15

WY

Mountaineering

Grand Teton

Fell

Jackson Hole Mountain Guides

F

Edmond, OK

43

http://rec-law.us/1spEHaK

http://rec-law.us/1nbZH2J

7/24

CO

Whitewater Rafting

Arkansas River, The Numbers

Fell out of raft

Timberline Tours

F

Dallas, TX

57

http://rec-law.us/1lC3ReN

http://rec-law.us/1pmumpZ

9/13

TN

Whitewater Rafting

Ocoee River

Raft flipped

Endless River Adventures

M

Clayton, NC

50

http://rec-law.us/1tTRGT9

http://rec-law.us/1oNpJWi

Several of the water fatalities can be medical. A sudden full body cold water immersion can cause vasoconstriction in the hear resulting in death. See the Wikipedia listing Cold shock response.

If you are unable to see this graph, please email me at Rec-law@recreation-law.com and I will send you a PDF of the page.

What do you think? Leave a comment.

If you like this let your friends know or post it on FB, Twitter or LinkedIn

Copyright 2014 Recreation Law (720) 334 8529

Email: Rec-law@recreation-law.com

Google+: +Recreation

Twitter: RecreationLaw

Facebook: Rec.Law.Now

Facebook Page: Outdoor Recreation & Adventure Travel Law

Blog: www.recreation-law.com

Mobile Site: http://m.recreation-law.com

By Recreation Law    Rec-law@recreation-law.com      James H. Moss         #Authorrank

<rel=”author” link=” https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/112453188060350225356/” />

 

#RecreationLaw, #Recreation-Law.com, #OutdoorLaw, #OutdoorRecreationLaw, #AdventureTravelLaw, #law, #TravelLaw, #JimMoss, #JamesHMoss, #Tourism, #AdventureTourism, #Rec-Law, #RiskManagement, #CyclingLaw, #BicyclingLaw, #FitnessLaw, #Recreation-Law.com, #Backpacking, #Hiking, #Mountaineering, #IceClimbing, #RockClimbing, #RopesCourse, #ChallengeCourse, #SummerCamp, #Camps, #YouthCamps, #Skiing, #Ski Areas, #Negligence, #Snowboarding, #RecreationLaw, #@RecreationLaw, #Cycling.Law, #SkiLaw, #Outside.Law, #Recreation.Law, #RecreationLaw.com, #OutdoorLaw, #RecreationLaw, #OutdoorRecreationLaw, #AdventureTravelLaw, #Law, #TravelLaw, #JimMoss, #JamesHMoss, #AttorneyatLaw, #Tourism, #AdventureTourism, #RecLaw, #RecLawBlog, #RecreationLawBlog, #RiskManagement, #HumanPowered, #HumanPoweredRecreation,# CyclingLaw, #BicyclingLaw, #FitnessLaw, #RecreationLaw.com, #Backpacking, #Hiking, #Mountaineering, #IceClimbing, #RockClimbing, #RopesCourse, #ChallengeCourse, #SummerCamp, #Camps, #YouthCamps, #Skiing, #Ski Areas, #Negligence, #Snowboarding, sport and recreation laws, ski law, cycling law, Colorado law, law for recreation and sport managers, bicycling and the law, cycling and the law, ski helmet law, skiers code, skiing accidents, Recreation Lawyer, Ski Lawyer, Paddlesports Lawyer, Cycling Lawyer, Recreational Lawyer, Fitness Lawyer, Rec Lawyer, Challenge Course Lawyer, Ropes Course Lawyer, Zip Line Lawyer, Rock Climbing Lawyer, Adventure Travel Lawyer, Outside Lawyer, Recreation Lawyer, Ski Lawyer, Paddlesports Lawyer, Cycling Lawyer, #RecreationalLawyer, #FitnessLawyer, #RecLawyer, #ChallengeCourseLawyer, #RopesCourseLawyer, #ZipLineLawyer, #RockClimbingLawyer, #AdventureTravelLawyer, #OutsideLawyer, Good Samaritan, Samaritan, First Aid, Whitewater Rafting, Rafting, Commercial, Commercial Raft Company, Commercial , Endless River Adventures, Timberline Tours, Jackson Hole Mountain Guides, Epley’s Whitewater Adventure, Blazing Adventures, Royal Gorge Rafting, Guide Service,

 

 

WordPress Tags: Commercial,Summer,Fatalities,condolences,families,information,news,Whitewater,Medical,Thank,Date,State,Where,Outfitter,Guide,Service,Home,Source,Colorado,River,Grand,Canyon,Badger,Rapid,SVpdfb,Allergic,reaction,Seattle,Clear,Creek,Fell,respirator,Brighton,Arkansas,Salt,Lick,boat,Royal,Gorge,Enid,Springs,Fork,Adventures,Denver,Salmon,Slide,Epley,Adventure,Poulsbo,Teton,Jackson,Hole,Mountain,Guides,Edmond,Numbers,Timberline,Tours,Dallas,Ocoee,Raft,Clayton,Several,immersion,death,Wikipedia,Cold,response,graph,recreation,Leave,Twitter,LinkedIn,Email,Google,RecreationLaw,Facebook,Page,Outdoor,Travel,Blog,Mobile,Site,James,Moss,Authorrank,author,OutdoorLaw,OutdoorRecreationLaw,AdventureTravelLaw,TravelLaw,JimMoss,JamesHMoss,Tourism,AdventureTourism,RiskManagement,CyclingLaw,BicyclingLaw,FitnessLaw,RopesCourse,ChallengeCourse,SummerCamp,Camps,YouthCamps,Areas,Negligence,SkiLaw,Outside,AttorneyatLaw,RecLaw,RecLawBlog,RecreationLawBlog,HumanPoweredRecreation,managers,helmet,accidents,Lawyer,Paddlesports,Recreational,Challenge,Course,Ropes,Line,Rock,RecreationalLawyer,FitnessLawyer,RecLawyer,ChallengeCourseLawyer,RopesCourseLawyer,ZipLineLawyer,RockClimbingLawyer,AdventureTravelLawyer,OutsideLawyer,Samaritan,Company

 


Commercial Summer Fatalities: 2014

Our condolences to the families of the deceased.

This list is not guaranteed to be accurate. The information is found from web searches and news dispatches. If you have a source for information on any fatality please leave a comment.

Whitewater fatalities are light blue

Medical fatalities are light red

This is up to date as of July 27, 2014

If this information is incorrect or incomplete please let me know. Thank You.

Date

State

Activity

Where

How

Outfitter or Guide Service

Sex

Home

Age

Source

Source

5/28

AZ

Whitewater Kayaking

Colorado River, Grand Canyon, Badger Rapid

Did not right his kayak

 

M

 

43

http://rec-law.us/SVpdfb

 

6/3

AZ

Whitewater Rafting

Colorado River, Grand Canyon

Allergic reaction

 

F

Seattle, WA

54

http://rec-law.us/1l4xk4K

 

6/7

CO

Whitewater Rafting

Clear Creek

Fell out of raft, possible respirator problems

 

M

Brighton, CO

41

http://rec-law.us/1uEp3Fc

http://rec-law.us/1rafOwq

6/10

CO

Whitewater Rafting

Arkansas River, Salt Lick

boat flipped or dump trucked

Royal Gorge Rafting

M

Enid, OK

48

http://rec-law.us/1spBsRI

http://rec-law.us/1niITC2

6/14

CO

Whitewater Rafting

Arkansas River, Royal Gorge

respiratory problems before he and five other rafters were tossed out

 

M

Colorado Springs, CO

44

http://rec-law.us/1nl63ZF

http://rec-law.us/1lXMEAj

6/16

CO

Whitewater Rafting

Roaring Fork river

Fell out of raft

Blazing Adventures

M

Denver, CO

44

http://rec-law.us/1lB7jey

 

6/27

ID

Whitewater Rafting

Salmon River, The Slide

Ejected from raft

Epley’s Whitewater Adventure

M

Poulsbo, WA

50

http://rec-law.us/1x79IAj

http://rec-law.us/1qPcLds

7/15

WY

Mountaineering

Grand Teton

Fell

Jackson Hole Mountain Guides

F

Edmond, OK

43

http://rec-law.us/1spEHaK

http://rec-law.us/1nbZH2J

7/24

CO

Whitewater Rafting

Arkansas River, The Numbers

Fell out of raft

Timberline Tours

F

Dallas, TX

57

http://rec-law.us/1lC3ReN

http://rec-law.us/1pmumpZ

Several of the water fatalities can be medical. A sudden full body cold water immersion can cause vasoconstriction in the hear resulting in death. See the Wikipedia listing Cold shock response.

If you are unable to see this graph, please email me at Rec-law@recreation-law.com and I will send you a PDF of the page.

What do you think? Leave a comment.

If you like this let your friends know or post it on FB, Twitter or LinkedIn

Copyright 2014 Recreation Law (720) 334 8529

Email: Rec-law@recreation-law.com

Google+: +Recreation

Twitter: RecreationLaw

Facebook: Rec.Law.Now

Facebook Page: Outdoor Recreation & Adventure Travel Law

Blog: www.recreation-law.com

Mobile Site: http://m.recreation-law.com

By Recreation Law    Rec-law@recreation-law.com      James H. Moss         #Authorrank

<rel=”author” link=” https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/112453188060350225356/” />

 

 

#RecreationLaw, #Recreation-Law.com, #OutdoorLaw, #OutdoorRecreationLaw, #AdventureTravelLaw, #law, #TravelLaw, #JimMoss, #JamesHMoss, #Tourism, #AdventureTourism, #Rec-Law, #RiskManagement, #CyclingLaw, #BicyclingLaw, #FitnessLaw, #Recreation-Law.com, #Backpacking, #Hiking, #Mountaineering, #IceClimbing, #RockClimbing, #RopesCourse, #ChallengeCourse, #SummerCamp, #Camps, #YouthCamps, #Skiing, #Ski Areas, #Negligence, #Snowboarding, #RecreationLaw, #@RecreationLaw, #Cycling.Law, #SkiLaw, #Outside.Law, #Recreation.Law, #RecreationLaw.com, #OutdoorLaw, #RecreationLaw, #OutdoorRecreationLaw, #AdventureTravelLaw, #Law, #TravelLaw, #JimMoss, #JamesHMoss, #AttorneyatLaw, #Tourism, #AdventureTourism, #RecLaw, #RecLawBlog, #RecreationLawBlog, #RiskManagement, #HumanPowered, #HumanPoweredRecreation,# CyclingLaw, #BicyclingLaw, #FitnessLaw, #RecreationLaw.com, #Backpacking, #Hiking, #Mountaineering, #IceClimbing, #RockClimbing, #RopesCourse, #ChallengeCourse, #SummerCamp, #Camps, #YouthCamps, #Skiing, #Ski Areas, #Negligence, #Snowboarding, sport and recreation laws, ski law, cycling law, Colorado law, law for recreation and sport managers, bicycling and the law, cycling and the law, ski helmet law, skiers code, skiing accidents, Recreation Lawyer, Ski Lawyer, Paddlesports Lawyer, Cycling Lawyer, Recreational Lawyer, Fitness Lawyer, Rec Lawyer, Challenge Course Lawyer, Ropes Course Lawyer, Zip Line Lawyer, Rock Climbing Lawyer, Adventure Travel Lawyer, Outside Lawyer, Recreation Lawyer, Ski Lawyer, Paddlesports Lawyer, Cycling Lawyer, #RecreationalLawyer, #FitnessLawyer, #RecLawyer, #ChallengeCourseLawyer, #RopesCourseLawyer, #ZipLineLawyer, #RockClimbingLawyer, #AdventureTravelLawyer, #OutsideLawyer, Good Samaritan, Samaritan, First Aid, Whitewater Rafting, Rafting, Commercial, Commercial Raft Company, Commercial Guide Service,

 

 

WordPress Tags: Commercial,Summer,Fatalities,condolences,families,information,news,Whitewater,Medical,Thank,Date,State,Where,Outfitter,Guide,Service,Home,Source,Colorado,River,Grand,Canyon,Badger,Rapid,SVpdfb,Allergic,reaction,Seattle,Clear,Creek,Fell,respirator,Brighton,Arkansas,Salt,Lick,boat,Royal,Gorge,Enid,Springs,Fork,Adventures,Denver,Salmon,Slide,Epley,Adventure,Poulsbo,Teton,Jackson,Hole,Mountain,Guides,Edmond,Numbers,Timberline,Tours,Dallas,Several,immersion,death,Wikipedia,Cold,response,graph,recreation,Leave,Twitter,LinkedIn,Edit,Email,Google,RecreationLaw,Facebook,Page,Outdoor,Travel,Blog,Mobile,Site,James,Moss,Authorrank,author,OutdoorLaw,OutdoorRecreationLaw,AdventureTravelLaw,TravelLaw,JimMoss,JamesHMoss,Tourism,AdventureTourism,RiskManagement,CyclingLaw,BicyclingLaw,FitnessLaw,RopesCourse,ChallengeCourse,SummerCamp,Camps,YouthCamps,Areas,Negligence,SkiLaw,Outside,AttorneyatLaw,RecLaw,RecLawBlog,RecreationLawBlog,HumanPoweredRecreation,managers,helmet,accidents,Lawyer,Paddlesports,Recreational,Challenge,Course,Ropes,Line,Rock,RecreationalLawyer,FitnessLawyer,RecLawyer,ChallengeCourseLawyer,RopesCourseLawyer,ZipLineLawyer,RockClimbingLawyer,AdventureTravelLawyer,OutsideLawyer,Samaritan,Raft,Company

 


Commercial Summer Fatalities: 2014

Our condolences to the families of the deceased.

This list is not guaranteed to be accurate. The information is found from web searches and news dispatches. If you have a source for information on any fatality please leave a comment.

Whitewater fatalities are light blue

Medical fatalities are light red

This is up to date as of July 1, 2014

If this information is incorrect or incomplete please let me know. Thank You.

Date

State

Activity

Where

How

Outfitter or Guide Service

Sex

Home

Age

Source

Source

5/28

AZ

Whitewater Kayaking

Colorado River, Grand Canyon, Badger Rapid

Did not right his kayak

 

M

 

43

http://rec-law.us/SVpdfb

 

6/3

AZ

Whitewater Rafting

Colorado River, Grand Canyon

Allergic reaction

 

F

Seattle, WA

54

http://rec-law.us/1l4xk4K

 

6/7

CO

Whitewater Rafting

Clear Creek

Fell out of raft, possible respirator problems

 

M

Brighton, CO

41

http://rec-law.us/1uEp3Fc

http://rec-law.us/1rafOwq

6/10

CO

Whitewater Rafting

Arkansas River, Salt Lick

boat flipped or dump trucked

Royal Gorge Rafting

M

Enid, OK

48

http://rec-law.us/1spBsRI

http://rec-law.us/1niITC2

6/14

CO

Whitewater Rafting

Arkansas River, Royal Gorge

respiratory problems before he and five other rafters were tossed out

 

M

Colorado Springs, CO

44

http://rec-law.us/1nl63ZF

http://rec-law.us/1lXMEAj

6/16

CO

Whitewater Rafting

Roaring Fork river

Fell out of raft

Blazing Adventures

M

Denver, CO

44

http://rec-law.us/1lB7jey

 

6/27

ID

Whitewater Rafting

Salmon River, The Slide

Ejected from raft

Epley’s Whitewater Adventure

M

Poulsbo, WA

50

http://rec-law.us/1x79IAj

http://rec-law.us/1qPcLds

Several of the water fatalities can be medical. A sudden full body cold water immersion can cause vasoconstriction in the hear resulting in death. See the Wikipedia listing Cold shock response.

If you are unable to see this graph, please email me at Rec-law@recreation-law.com and I will send you a PDF of the page.

What do you think? Leave a comment.

If you like this let your friends know or post it on FB, Twitter or LinkedIn

Copyright 2013 Recreation Law (720) Edit Law

Email: Rec-law@recreation-law.com

Google+: +Recreation

Twitter: RecreationLaw

Facebook: Rec.Law.Now

Facebook Page: Outdoor Recreation & Adventure Travel Law

Blog:www.recreation-law.com

Mobile Site: http://m.recreation-law.com

By Recreation Law    Rec-law@recreation-law.com      James H. Moss         #Authorrank

<rel=”author” link=” https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/112453188060350225356/” />

 

 

#RecreationLaw, #Recreation-Law.com, #OutdoorLaw, #OutdoorRecreationLaw, #AdventureTravelLaw, #law, #TravelLaw, #JimMoss, #JamesHMoss, #Tourism, #AdventureTourism, #Rec-Law, #RiskManagement, #CyclingLaw, #BicyclingLaw, #FitnessLaw, #Recreation-Law.com, #Backpacking, #Hiking, #Mountaineering, #IceClimbing, #RockClimbing, #RopesCourse, #ChallengeCourse, #SummerCamp, #Camps, #YouthCamps, #Skiing, #Ski Areas, #Negligence, #Snowboarding, #RecreationLaw, #@RecreationLaw, #Cycling.Law, #SkiLaw, #Outside.Law, #Recreation.Law, #RecreationLaw.com, #OutdoorLaw, #RecreationLaw, #OutdoorRecreationLaw, #AdventureTravelLaw, #Law, #TravelLaw, #JimMoss, #JamesHMoss, #AttorneyatLaw, #Tourism, #AdventureTourism, #RecLaw, #RecLawBlog, #RecreationLawBlog, #RiskManagement, #HumanPowered, #HumanPoweredRecreation,# CyclingLaw, #BicyclingLaw, #FitnessLaw, #RecreationLaw.com, #Backpacking, #Hiking, #Mountaineering, #IceClimbing, #RockClimbing, #RopesCourse, #ChallengeCourse, #SummerCamp, #Camps, #YouthCamps, #Skiing, #Ski Areas, #Negligence, #Snowboarding, sport and recreation laws, ski law, cycling law, Colorado law, law for recreation and sport managers, bicycling and the law, cycling and the law, ski helmet law, skiers code, skiing accidents, Recreation Lawyer, Ski Lawyer, Paddlesports Lawyer, Cycling Lawyer, Recreational Lawyer, Fitness Lawyer, Rec Lawyer, Challenge Course Lawyer, Ropes Course Lawyer, Zip Line Lawyer, Rock Climbing Lawyer, Adventure Travel Lawyer, Outside Lawyer, Recreation Lawyer, Ski Lawyer, Paddlesports Lawyer, Cycling Lawyer, #RecreationalLawyer, #FitnessLawyer, #RecLawyer, #ChallengeCourseLawyer, #RopesCourseLawyer, #ZipLineLawyer, #RockClimbingLawyer, #AdventureTravelLawyer, #OutsideLawyer, Good Samaritan, Samaritan, First Aid, Whitewater Rafting, Rafting, Commercial, Commercial Raft Company, Commercial Guide Service,

 


Want to Maximize a Visit to Colorado? San Juan Mountain Guides can help!

Fall 2013 Newsletter San Juan Mountain Guides
San Juan Summer 2014
Summer fun is on the horizon with many adventures to be had, in the San Juan Mountains and beyond. We invite you to explore mountains, reach high peaks, descend canyons, scale rocks and find excitement on the Via Ferrata. Join us to try something new and to discover remarkable places.Our summer programs are shaping up great outings for everyone, and for all skill levels. Choices are numerous from Alpine Climbing in the San Juan Mountains to Backpacking in the Weminuche Wilderness, Rock Climbing and Canyoning near Ouray or the exhilarating Telluride Via Ferrata. To top it off we have an expedition to Peru’s Alpamayo in July with only 1 spot left!!Please read below for Upcoming Trip Offerings, Featured Guide Interviews, SJMG Guide Tips and Guide Blogs, as well as inspiring photos from seasons past.As always, don’t hesitate to contact us to schedule your next trip, course, or expedition with The Local Experts!

Nate Disser and the SJMG Team
800.642.5389
www.mtnguide.net
info

SJMG Blog

Featured SJMG Guide: Dave Ahrens
a598ed81-fc18-41aa-9893-bd667518ea60.pngDave AhrensAMGA Certified Rock & Alpine GuideDave’s outlook is super positive and his stoke is always high. He has guided extensively in Washington and Alaska. His ability to read clients and be perceptive to their needs is outstanding. Dave is all about fun and good times in the mountains. On skis, on ice, in the alpine, his experience and expertise shine; all a while being as humble and kind as can be. Cheers Dave, we love having you on our team!Dave Ahrens Guide Interview

  • Superior Guest Review of Dave:Our guide Dave was professional and highly enjoyable to be with. We were encouraged to take leadership and develop skills with an appropriate amount of support from Dave, thus building our skills for future ventures. Location and objective selection were exceptional. Our interactions exceeded all expectations of safety, professionalism, friendliness, patience, knowledge, and teaching ability. Thanks for the awesome time Dave!”
SJMG Guide Tip: Using the Munter Hitch
837ea69e-250e-4f34-9f99-0c2b806d7183.pngby Nate DisserAMGA Certified Rock & Alpine GuideHave you ever considered what would happen if you dropped your belay device 3 pitches up a multi-pitch rock or ice climb? What if you don’t have an extra belay device handy in that case??Check out this guide tip, with video, to learn how to rappel and lower using the Munter Hitch – just one way you can effectively salvage your day and keep both you and your climbing partner protected at the same time!Lowering & Rappelling w/ the Munter Hitch
Upcoming SJMG Programs
1495cdd4-5014-4ae9-97b6-a428fd2d338f.pngAlpine ClimbingColorado’s San Juan MountainsClimb a classic route on one of Colorado’s Centennial 13’ers or 14’ers like the Wilson/El Diente Traverse, Chicago Basin 14’ers, Jagged Mountain’s North Face, or Vestal Peak’s Wham Ridge.Want to know what the alpine climbing is like in the San Juans during the summer? Check out this video we shot last year during a climb of the Wham Ridge on Vestal Peak!Alpine Climbing CoursesLearn the fundamentals of safely climbing in the mountains. Our Alpine Climbing Courses cover a wide range of topics that will enhance your skills and efficiency in the alpine. These trips take you to incredible mountain terrain to apply your techniques. Our Alpine Leadership Course was designed to fully prepare you for future alpine endeavors!Chicago Basin 14’ers
Vestal Peak’s Wham Ridge
Wilson/El Diente Traverse
Mt. Sneffels
Private/Custom Alpine Guiding

175e1f3b-5d01-4e7d-8eb3-eed5d0abc480.png

Backpacking Trips
Weminuche WIlderness & San Juan National Forest

Discover the beauty of the Rockies this summer on a backpacking adventure in the Colorado’s largest wilderness area. Our premier backpacking trip, the Best of the Weminuche covers parts of the Continental Divide Trail and the Colorado Trail, with high mountain passes and amazing peaks all around.

Our popular Alpine Lakes Traverse takes you to parts of the Weminuche Wilderness that few people see – and defines the essence of remote wilderness travel. Multi-day adventures into majestic mountains will leave you feeling rejuvenated!

Best of the Weminuche Backpacking
Alpine Lakes Traverse
Ice Lakes Basin Backpacking
Chicago Basin Backpacking
Private/Custom Backpack Guiding

Via Ferrata and Canyoning
8010f0ad-bb75-4e65-8e2c-40fb5ece67e9.pngTelluride Via FerrataInnovative and genius visionary Chuck Kroeger designed and constructed this awesome Via Ferrata in the Bridalveil Valley near Telluride. The “Iron Way” is a climber traverse high up on the cliffs and walls of this gorgeous valley.Not physically hard, but rather thrillingly exciting, the Via Ferrata is a must do in the area. With radical exposure and fun traversing, this fantastic route will be the highlight of your summer.

Telluride Via Ferrata

e781e823-7a37-4f4d-a523-c84e98e2dfca.png

Canyoning in Ouray
Half and Full Day Canyoning

Alpine canyons surround the town of Ouray and provide brilliant adventure for groups and families.

Descend Portland Creek Canyon or Angel Creek Canyon with us this summer and ignite your enthusiasm for discovery while rappelling down crystal waterfalls and journeying deep inside narrow slots. For those with previous experience – we offer the inspiring Oak Creek Canyon for a full day wet and wild adventure.

Expeditions: Ecuador, Alpamayo, & More!
61c2939f-e2e6-4d91-813b-67a37a72d651.pngEcuador’s VolcanoesDecember 2014 & January 2015Spots are already filling on our Cotopaxi Express and Chimbo Extension Expeditions later this year and early in 2015. Both climbs represent unparalleled opportunities to test your mettle at altitudes over 6000 meters! Our time-tested itinerary offers you the best chance for success on the peaks and visits a number of cultural sites in Ecuador. This is one of our most popular international trips for a reason!!Cotopaxi Express w/ Chimborazo Extension Option

e503bd62-e534-4922-87a2-935ce878d7ba.png

Alpamayo Expedition – 1 Spot Left!!
Climbing in Peru’s Cordillera Blanca

This coming summer season is loaded, not only with fantastic trips in the San Juan Mountains, but we also have a ‘trip of a lifetime’ expedition in Peru to climb Alpamayo via the French Direct Route!

We have 1 space left on our July 10 – 25, 2014 Alpamayo Expedition. This trip is being run by SJMG Guide Andres Marin. Don’t miss out on this opportunity to climb one of the world’s iconic mountains with an AMGA Certified Rock & Alpine Guide!

Alpamayo Expedition July 10 – 25, 2015

Parting Shot : in Honor Of Eitan Green
dab59d67-127a-450f-b029-d27d6a7fd537.jpg
BOOK A TRIP REQUEST INFO

San Juan Mountain Guides, LLC
725 Main St. Ouray, CO 81427 or 1111 Camino del Rio, Durango, CO 81301

800.642.5389
www.mtnguide.net
info

sjmg_logo.4.jpg

open.php?u=44de28c83db9522e98b74cef7&id=52ed41817c&e=0c126aea41


The American Alpine Club is pleased to announce a Call For Applications for the 2014 Zack Martin Breaking Barriers Grant

The American Alpine Club is pleased to announce a Call for Applications for the 2014 Zack Martin Breaking Barriers Grant. ZMBB grant applications are due, this year, on April 30

A special thanks to Black Diamond and Petzl for supporting this grant through special merchandise deals for the recipients.

The AAC Grants Webpage

http://www.americanalpineclub.org/grants

Zack Martin Breaking Barriers Grant Page

http://www.americanalpineclub.org/grant/zackmartinbreakingbarriersgrant

The Zack Martin Breaking Barriers Grant (ZMBB) is a dual-purpose grant fund. The primary objective is humanitarian and the secondary objective is climbing, alpinism and/or exploration in the natural environment. The grantee must meet both objectives and is strongly encouraged to obtain additional funding. The humanitarian objective must be reasonable, and sustainable. Objectives that continue after implementation will receive the highest level of consideration. Focus the objective to affect the greatest human change. The alpine objective should focus on climbing and/or exploration but need not be at the leading edge of climbing or alpinism.

Zack Martin died just before his 25th birthday on Thanksgiving Day 2002. He was a recipient of AAC grants, the Anatoli Boukreev grant and others. Zack was concerned about the general arrogance and self-serving aspirations of climbers and explorers. He committed that on all future expeditions he would not only climb and explore but more importantly he would perform humanitarian service in the local community. He would “break a barrier” in the alpine environment and “break a barrier” in the heart of man. As Zack often said, “The only barrier holding you back is yourself.”

The American Alpine Club Webpage

http://www.americanalpineclub.org

The Donate To The Zack Martin Fund

American Alpine Club

c/o Donations—The Zack Martin Grant Fund

710 10th St

Suite 100

Golden, CO 80401

Include on check:

Zack Martin Breaking Barriers Fund

What do you think? Leave a comment.

If you like this let your friends know or post it on FB, Twitter or LinkedIn

Copyright 2014 Recreation Law (720) Edit Law

Email: Rec-law@recreation-law.com

Google+: +Recreation

Twitter: RecreationLaw

Facebook: Rec.Law.Now

Facebook Page: Outdoor Recreation & Adventure Travel Law

Blog:www.recreation-law.com

Mobile Site: http://m.recreation-law.com

By Recreation Law    Rec-law@recreation-law.com      James H. Moss         #Authorrank

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Honorary member of the Italian Academic Alpine Club acceptance speech is an eloquent statement on why we climb mountains

Whether you climb or not, you should read this speech. It will justify your actions provide you with ideas to defend our desire to climb, no matter the risk.

Bernard Amy is a well-known French mountaineer and President the French Observatoir pour les Pratiques de la Montagne et de l’ Alpinisme (OPMA). He was granted honorary membership in the Italian Academic Alpine Club (CAIC). His acceptance speech can be found here.

Mr. Amy’s speech should be read by every mountaineer and should be read by every person who is attempting to stop a mountaineer. Some Quotes:

Rather, in order to have mountaineering accepted as a risky activity, we must explain what the mountains give us and what we learn from them.  In other words, we must not try to explain why we go to the mountains, but what we find there.

Like all passions, the passion for mountaineering is characterized by a permanent element of doubt, a continuous questioning of oneself about the sense of the activity. Be he young or old, a mountaineer needs to feel strong.  For this the social recognition of the group is essential.

These are valuable and strong statements by someone who has concentrated to find the thrill, the accomplishment and the satisfaction of standing on the summit.

Congratulations Mr. Amy on your honorary membership in the CAIC. Thank you for providing us support for our future endeavors to keep mountains open and mountain tops great places of worship for our soles.

Bernard Amy says we must explain what the mountains give us and what we learn from them

What do you think? Leave a comment.

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Have you read your health and life policy to see if your activities are excluded. This travel insurance policy excluded mountaineering and skiing

First this case defines mountaineering, legally! The court carefully picked its way through the language of the policy to keep the injured plaintiff in the lawsuit a little longer. That probably means the insurance company settled the case rather than spend more money fighting, but that is only speculation.

Redmond v. Sirius International Insurance Corporation, 2014 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 5089

Date of the Decision: January 15, 2014

Plaintiff: Ryan M. Redmond

Defendant: Sirius International Insurance Corporation

Plaintiff Claims: breach of contract and insurance bad faith

Defendant Defenses: the contract

Holding: Cross motions for summary judgment denied, case headed for trial

The plaintiff in this case when ski mountaineering in Grand Teton National Park. Half way up Ellingwood Couloir, the plaintiff and a friend stopped climbing and started to ski down. Two other friends proceeded up the couloir. The plaintiff fell, tumbling down the mountain. He was eventually airlifted from the park.

The plaintiff had purchased a travel policy. The insurance company that issued the travel policy, relying upon the exclusions in the policy, denied coverage for the plaintiff’s injuries. The plaintiff and the defendant insurance company filed motions for summary judgment covering multiple issues, including a dismissal of the case due to the policy exclusions.

Summary of the case

The policy exclusions stated:

All charges, costs, expenses and/or claims (collectively “Charges”) incurred by the Insured Person and directly or indirectly relating to or arising from or in connection with any of the following acts …:

* * *

(11) Charges incurred for any surgery, Treatment or supplies relating to, arising from or in connection with, for, or as a result of:

* * *

(d) any Injury or Illness sustained while taking part in mountaineering activities where specialized climbing equipment, ropes or guides are normally or reasonably should have been used, Amateur Athletics, Professional Athletics, aviation (except when traveling solely as a passenger in a commercial aircraft), hang gliding and parachuting, snow skiing except for recreational downhill and/or cross country snow skiing (no cover provided whilst skiing in violation of applicable laws, rules or regulations; away from prepared and marked in-bound territories; and/or against the advice of the local ski school or local authoritative body), racing of any kind including by horse, motor vehicle (of any type) or motorcycle, spelunking, and subaqua pursuits involving underwater breathing apparatus (except as otherwise expressly set forth in Section Q. Recreational Underwater Activities). Practice or training in preparation for any excluded activity which results in injury will be considered as activity while taking part in such activity; and/or

(e) any Illness or Injury sustained while participating in any sporting, recreational or ad-venture activity where such activity is undertaken against the advice or direction of any local authority or any qualified instructor or contrary to the rules, recommendations and procedures of a recognized governing body for the sport or activity….

Basically the policy attempted to exclude recreational activities except skiing at a ski area.

The court first looked at the requirements for either party to win a motion for summary judgment. Similar in most courts in most cases.

“The court shall grant summary judgment if the movant shows that there is no genuine dispute as to any material fact and the movant is entitled to judgment as a matter of law.” A material fact is one that might affect the outcome of the case, and a nonmoving party’s dispute is “genuine” only if a reasonable finder of fact could find in the nonmoving party’s favor at trial. The court views the facts in the light most favorable to the non-moving party, and likewise it draws all inferences in the non-movant’s favor. The court may not weigh the evidence or make credibility determinations. Thus, the nonmoving party will defeat a motion for summary judgment if it is able to produce admissible evidence that, when viewed in the most favorable light, would be sufficient to enable the finder of fact to return a verdict in its favor.

The court then looked at the requirements on interpreting an insurance policy. Insurance policies are contracts and must meet all contract requirements. Insurance policies in many states also have to meet specific requirements and have different ways of interpreting some specific insurance issues. In Wisconsin policies are interpreted as a contract first.

“An insurance policy is a contract, and as such is subject to the same rules of construction as other contracts.” Because contract interpretation is primarily a question of law, it is a matter that is generally well-suited for summary judgment. “When interpreting an insurance contract courts must look at the contract as a whole.” In construing an insurance contract, the court should do “so as not to render any words, phrases, or terms ineffective or meaningless.” Terms should be given their plain and ordinary meaning. In determining the “plain and ordinary meaning” of a term, courts will frequently turn to dictionaries.

However, if a provision of an insurance contract is ambiguous, it is to be construed strictly against the insurer. An insurance contract is not ambiguous simply because parties each have their own interpretation of a provision. Rather, “[a]n insurance contract is ambiguous when it is susceptible to more than one interpretation and reasonably intelligent persons would honestly differ as to its meaning.”

Construction against the author of a contract is a common occurrence in the law. The party that drafts the contract is the party that loses if the court is faced with a situation where the exact intention of the language is not clear. Instead of tossing a coin, the writer of the contract loses.

The court looked at the exclusion language above to determine if the activity of climbing up a couloir and skiing down is mountain climbing.

First the court determined that mountaineering did not encompass the action of skiing down the mountain. When in doubt in defining words courts use dictionaries.

The Oxford English Dictionary defines “mountaineering” as, “The action or sport of climbing mountains.” Oxford English Dictionary, (January 15, 2014), http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/239554.

Merriam-Webster similarly defines it as “the sport or technique of scaling mountains.” Merriam-Webster, (January 15, 2014), http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/mountaineering.

The definition within the American Heritage Dictionary states, “The climbing of mountains, especially using special equipment and techniques on rock, ice, or snow.

Also called mountain climbing.” American Heritage Dictionary, (January 15, 2014), http://www.ahdictionary.com/word/search.html?q=mountaineering.

The definitions all defined mountaineering as climbing and climbing means going up. However, the court also found that:

Thus, if “mountaineering” is defined by reference to “climbing” and climbing can denote either ascent or descent, then necessarily, “mountaineering” must include both ascent and descent. The court finds this understanding of mountaineering to be the only logical definition. After all, in the context of mountaineering, the proverb “What goes up, must come down,” is generally literally true.

The next issue then if skiing down was not mountaineering and excluded, was the issue, whether the activity which injured the plaintiff violated the ski terms of the policy. The court then had to consider if skiing in a couloir in a national park is skiing out of bounds. The defendant argued that ski mountaineering was encompassed by the term mountaineering. However, the court did not agree. “The court also rejects the defendant’s contention that the mountaineering exclusion encompasses “ski mountaineering,” which the defendant characterizes as a subset of mountaineering.”

The plaintiff argued that ski mountaineering required the use of ropes and other specialized equipment. The court found that the term mountaineering did not encompass ski mountaineering.

Thank heavens for us; the court did not accept either of these definitions.

The next issue was whether or not the acts of the plaintiff fell within the exclusions in the policy concerning skiing. The court reviewed the policy and the skiing exclusion and defined the exclusion this way.

This provision, moving back and forth between coverage and exclusions, is far from a model of clarity. It first excludes coverage for injuries sustained while snow skiing but then immediately excludes from the exclusion (and thus covers) injuries sustained while “recreational downhill and/or cross country snow skiing,” and then adds a parenthetical to now exclude from the exclusion to the exclusion (and thus deny coverage for) injuries sustained while “skiing in violation of applicable laws, rules or regulations; away from prepared and marked in-bound territories; and/or against the advice of the local ski school or local authoritative body.” The net effect of this provision is that injuries sustained as a result of recreational snow skiing are covered provided the skiing was not unlawful, against the advice of certain entities, or “away from prepared and marked in-bound territories.”

(You always wondered what someone learns in law school. You learn to read policy exclusions and then interpret them as explained above. The court found the language in the policy: “This provision, moving back and forth between coverage and exclusions, is far from a model of clarity.”)

The plaintiff argued that he was skiing in an area allowed by the insurance policy because anywhere within Grand Teton National Park was allowed to be skied, and he did not leave the park boundary. Inbounds meaning in the National Park. The court then looked at other aspects of the policy to determine what was meant.

“Recreational” is not ambiguous. It is readily understood as, “An activity or pastime which is pursued for the pleasure or interest it provides.” Oxford English Dictionary, (January 15, 2014), http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/159954.

There is no evidence that Redmond was skiing for any purpose other than the pure pleasure or interest the sport provides, and thus the court concludes that Redmond’s skiing on the day of his injury was recreational.

Thus, competitive or commercial skiing likely would not be covered under the policy.

The net effect of the review was the court could not determine if the actions of the plaintiff were excluded by the policy. The definitions the court used and defined in making this determination do have value.

…Redmond [plaintiff] was skiing away from prepared and marked in-bound territories, this plainly encompasses more than simply skiing in an area where skiing is not barred. Thus, having concluded that “away from” means roughly “outside of,” restating this exclusion as a positive question, the issue before the court becomes, “Was Redmond skiing in a prepared and marked in-bound territory when he was injured?” Only if he was would the policy possibly afford coverage for his injures.

The court then looking at the overview of skiing could not determine what the terms in the skiing exclusion meant.

The court presumes that if a ski area is bordered on the sides by signs and ropes demarcating the boundaries of the permissible skiing area, it is likely “marked” within the scope of the policy. But is this the only kind of identification that will render an area “marked?” What if the area is depicted on a map that includes boundary lines indicating the recommended areas for skiing? If markings on a map are sufficient, who must prepare such a map to render the area marked? Must the map be prepared by the entity in charge of the area, e.g. the National Park Service, or would a map prepared by a person with special knowledge of the area suffice? Or must the markings even relate to the in-bound territories? Would a sign in the vicinity of the mountain stating “Ski at your own risk,” suffice as a marking? Perhaps there are many other plausible understandings of this term.

The court finally determined that the terms “prepared” and “marked” were not defined adequately in the policy. Therefore, the policy was ambiguous. The court could not grant the defendant’s motion for summary judgment. That issue was left for a jury to decide.

The case went on for multiple pages discussing all the motions filed by each side. This issue was the only one of importance.

So Now What?

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) created this exclusion in health insurance policies. The exclusion is legal, but up to an insurance company to enact and place its policies. Several attempts have been made since HIPAA was enacted to correct this issue; however, all have died in committee.

Simply put the court worked hard to determine a way the plaintiff would have insurance.  The simple term “ski area,” added to the definition of skiing would have made the purpose of the lawsuit irrelevant. Obviously, the ski area description was solely for skiing inbounds not in a park.

If you enjoy recreating in the outdoors, make sure that you have the insurance coverage you believe you are paying for. Read your policy or find someone who can read it for you. An insurance policy is more than something to read when you can’t get to sleep at night.

What do you think? Leave a comment.

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Copyright 2014 Recreation Law (720) Edit Law

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By Recreation Law       Rec-law@recreation-law.com              James H. Moss               #Authorrank

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Redmond v. Sirius International Insurance Corporation, 2014 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 5089

Redmond v. Sirius International Insurance Corporation, 2014 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 5089

Ryan M. Redmond, Plaintiff, v. Sirius International Insurance Corporation, Defendant.

Case No. 12-CV-587

UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE EASTERN DISTRICT OF WISCONSIN

2014 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 5089

January 15, 2014, Decided

January 15, 2014, Filed

PRIOR HISTORY: Redmond v. Sirius Int’l Ins. Corp., 2012 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 110594 (E.D. Wis., Aug. 7, 2012)

CORE TERMS: skiing, bad faith claim, coverage, mountaineering, summary judgment, marked, choice of law, ski, territory, in-bound, mountain, insurer, dictionary, insurance contracts, insurance policies, recreational, insured, climbing, ambiguous, snow, forum selection clause, jury trial, deposition, moot, climb, descent, http, www, com, interest of justice

COUNSEL: [*1] For Ryan M Redmond, Plaintiff: Dean P Laing, Douglas P Dehler, LEAD ATTORNEYS, O’Neil Cannon Hollman DeJong & Laing SC, Milwaukee, WI.

For Sirius International Insurance Corporation, Defendant: Barry A Chasnoff, Mary M Pena, LEAD ATTORNEYS, Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP, San Antonio, TX; Jeffrey A Evans, von Briesen & Roper SC, Milwaukee, WI.

JUDGES: AARON E. GOODSTEIN, U.S. Magistrate Judge.

OPINION BY: AARON E. GOODSTEIN

OPINION

DECISION AND ORDER

I. PROCEDURAL HISTORY

Ryan M. Redmond (“Redmond”) was seriously injured while skiing at Grand Teton National Park on July 2, 2011. When his health insurer, Sirius International Insurance Corporation (“Sirius”), [*2] denied coverage for his injuries, Redmond filed the present action, initially in Waukesha County Circuit Court. Sirius removed the action to federal court on June 8, 2012 based upon the diversity of the parties. On June 14, 2012, Sirius filed its answer and a counterclaim along with a motion to transfer the case to the Southern District of Indiana. Redmond responded to the motion and also filed motions asking that the court strike the defendant’s answer and counterclaim and asking the court to require the defendant to post bond in accordance with Wisconsin law.

On August 7, 2012, the court denied the plaintiff’s motions. With respect to Sirius’ motion to transfer the action to the Southern District of Indiana, the court found that the record was insufficient to permit the court to resolve the motion and therefore held the motion in abeyance as the parties engaged in discovery. On March 20, 2013, the court denied without prejudice the motion to transfer.

On September 9, 2013, the parties filed a total of eight separate motions. (Docket Nos. 54, 56, 58, 60, 63, 66, 70, 75.) The plaintiff subsequently filed two additional motions. (Docket Nos. 84, 107.) Of these 10 motions, the court must [*3] first address the defendant’s renewed motion to transfer the case to Southern District of Indiana, (Docket No. 54), and thus decide whether this court or the Southern District of Indiana should resolve the 9 other motions.

II. MOTION TO TRANSFER

The relevant policy contains a forum selection clause providing that venue for any action related to the policy shall be in “the Circuit and/or Superior Courts of Marion County [Indiana] and in the United States District Court for the Southern District of Indiana, Indianapolis Division (assuming that federal jurisdiction is otherwise appropriate and lawful).” (Docket No. 7 at 3-4.) If the forum selection clause is valid, pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 1404(a), the “court should transfer the case unless extraordinary circumstances unrelated to the convenience of the parties clearly disfavor a transfer.” Atl. Marine Constr. Co. v. United States Dist. Court, 517 U.S. , , 187 L. Ed. 2d 487, 494, 134 S. Ct. 568 (2013).

Wisconsin law bars such forum selection clauses in insurance policies. Wis. Stat. § 631.83(3)(b). But Wisconsin’s prohibition applies to only “insurance policies and group certificates delivered or issued for delivery in this state, on property ordinarily [*4] located in this state, on persons residing in this state when the policy or group certificate is issued, or on business operations in this state.” Wis. Stat. § 631.01(1). The defendant’s argument against the application of this provision is limited to its view that Redmond was not “residing in” Wisconsin at the time the policy was issued. Sirius does not present, and therefore the court shall not consider any other arguments that may be raised as to why this statutory proscription may be inapplicable to the present dispute.

As the court discussed at length in its prior order, Redmond v. Sirius Int’l Ins. Corp., 2012 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 110594 (E.D. Wis. Aug. 7, 2012), there is a dispute as to whether Redmond was “residing in” Wisconsin when the policy was issued. The court concluded that “residing in” “include[s] [*5] not only those who dwell within the state for a long-term or extended period of time, but also, to the extent that the categories are not redundant, those who have Wisconsin as their domicile, i.e. ‘an individual’s true, fixed, and permanent home where the individual intends to remain permanently and indefinitely and to which, whenever absent, the individual intends to return.'” 2012 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 110594 at *21 (quoting Wis. Stat. §§ 71.01(1n), 71.22(1t)).

Redmond traveled frequently. In fact, the insurance policy that is at issue here was designed specifically to serve the needs of such travelers. He lived in his mother’s home in Delafield, Wisconsin until November 5, 2006 when he left for about six months of missionary work in Peru. He returned to Wisconsin and lived in Wisconsin until August 29, 2010, aside from a total of 30 days of missionary work in Peru and a month working on a Canadian dude ranch.

On August 25, 2010, from his home in Wisconsin, Redmond electronically submitted an application for renewal of his health insurance for the period of October 20, 2010 to October 20, 2011. (Docket No. 88, ¶8.) In doing so, he requested that the policy documents be sent to him in Vermont where he would be attending [*6] school. The application was approved the following day and the declaration and certificate were issued. (Docket No. 88, ¶9.) On August 29, 2010, Redmond left Wisconsin to travel to Vermont where he leased an apartment and attended school from August 30, 2010 through May 20, 2011, returning to Wisconsin in the interim for holidays. (Docket No. 88, ¶¶11-12.) Following May 20, 2011, Redmond returned to Wisconsin. (Docket No. 88, ¶13.)

The court finds that notwithstanding his travels and attendance at school in Vermont, Wisconsin remained Redmond’s domicile, and thus he was “residing in” Wisconsin when the policy was issued. This conclusion is further supported by the facts that Redmond filed taxes, had bank accounts, voted, and registered a vehicle in only Wisconsin. (Docket No. 88, ¶¶16-19.) Consequently, the policy’s forum selection clause is unenforceable under Wis. Stat. § 631.83(3)(b).

Having concluded that the forum selection clause is invalid, the court must turn to Sirius’ alternative argument and consider whether, after balancing all relevant factors, transfer to the Southern District of Indiana remains appropriate pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 1404(a). “For the convenience of parties [*7] and witnesses, in the interest of justice, a district court may transfer any civil action to any other district or division where it might have been brought.” 28 U.S.C. § 1404(a).

Section 1404 (a) reflects an increased desire to have federal civil suits tried in the federal system at the place called for in the particular case by considerations of convenience and justice. Thus, as the Court recognized in Continental Grain Co. v. Barge FBL-585, 364 U.S. 19, 26, 27, 80 S. Ct. 1470, 4 L. Ed. 2d 1540, [(1960)], the purpose of the section is to prevent the waste “of time, energy and money” and “to protect litigants, witnesses and the public against unnecessary inconvenience and expense….”

Van Dusen v. Barrack, 376 U.S. 612, 616, 84 S. Ct. 805, 11 L. Ed. 2d 945 (1964) (footnotes omitted). There is no dispute that this action could have been filed in the Southern District of Indiana. Thus, the court’s analysis is limited to consideration of the convenience of the parties and witnesses and the interest of justice. The movant “has the burden of establishing, by reference to particular circumstances, that the transferee forum is clearly more convenient.” Coffey v. Van Dorn Iron Works, 796 F.2d 217, 219-20 (7th Cir. 1986).

“With respect to the convenience evaluation, [*8] courts generally consider the availability of and access to witnesses, and each party’s access to and distance from resources in each forum. Other related factors include the location of material events and the relative ease of access to sources of proof.” Research Automation, Inc. v. Schrader-Bridgeport Int’l, Inc., 626 F.3d 973, 978 (7th Cir. 2010) (citations omitted). “The ‘interest of justice’ is a separate element of the transfer analysis that relates to the efficient administration of the court system.” Id.

For this element, courts look to factors including docket congestion and likely speed to trial in the transferor and potential transferee forums; each court’s relative familiarity with the relevant law; the respective desirability of resolving controversies in each locale; and the relationship of each community to the controversy. The interest of justice may be determinative, warranting transfer or its denial even where the convenience of the parties and witnesses points toward the opposite result.

Id. (citations omitted).

Neither forum is especially more convenient for the parties or witnesses. Of the witnesses identified by the parties as likely to testify at trial, four live [*9] in Wyoming, one lives in Colorado, two (or three using the defendant’s count of potential witnesses) live in Indiana, one (the plaintiff) lives in Wisconsin (not Vermont as the defendant states), and one lives in Florida but maintains an apartment and office in Wisconsin. (Docket Nos. 87 at 15; 55 at 10.) The plaintiff’s attorneys have offices in Milwaukee, Wisconsin; the defendant’s attorneys are located in San Antonio, Texas, and are assisted by local counsel. Thus, a number of people are going to have to travel for trial. When traveling from Wyoming, Colorado, or Texas, it makes little difference whether the destination is Indianapolis or Milwaukee. The convenience of a trial in Indianapolis for the witnesses in Indiana would be countered by the inconvenience to the plaintiff, his attorneys, as well as his expert.

The defendant also notes that evidence, such as the plaintiff’s insurance documents, is more likely to be found at offices in Indiana. (Docket No. 55 at 10.) The court finds that in the usual case, the location of documentary evidence is generally an inconsequential consideration. Routine discovery in any case will involve digitizing documents and thus whether parties are [*10] separated by city blocks or time zones, the means and ease of exchange will be the same. The court has no reason to believe this would not be the case here. And after all, discovery is complete so this truly is a non-issue.

The court also recognizes that, although it is unenforceable under Wisconsin law, the fact that the parties agreed to a forum selection may be given some weight in the analysis under § 1404(a). See IFC Credit Corp. v. Aliano Bros. Gen. Contrs., Inc., 437 F.3d 606, 608 (7th Cir. 2006) (citing Stewart Org., Inc. v. Ricoh Corp., 487 U.S. 22, 31, 108 S. Ct. 2239, 101 L. Ed. 2d 22 (1988). However, the fact of the parties’ agreement is counterbalanced by Wisconsin’s strong public policy against forum selection clauses in insurance contracts; thus, the interests of justice lead to the conclusion that this fact merits negligible weight. Cf. id.

With further respect to the interests of justice factor, the defendant points to the fact that the policy states, “Indiana law shall govern all rights and claims raised under this Certificate of Insurance.” (Docket No. 55-1 at ¶6.) Whether Indiana law actually governs this case is the subject of a separate motion. (Docket No. 58.) As discussed below, the court finds [*11] that Indiana law does govern the interpretation of the present contract. Nonetheless, the court does not find that this factor is sufficient to overcome the presumption of preference for the plaintiff’s chosen forum. Although a federal court in Indiana will naturally be more familiar with Indiana law, applying laws from other states is a routine task for federal courts. The defendant has not identified any reason for the court to believe that the legal questions in this action will involve especially novel or complex interpretations of Indiana law such that there is a strong reason to have this matter overseen by a court with more intimate familiarity with Indiana law.

Therefore, having concluded that the forum selection clause is not enforceable and consideration of all the § 1404(a) factors fails to show that the Southern District of Indiana is clearly more convenient and/or favored as a result of a consideration of the interests of justice, the defendant’s motion to transfer this action, (Docket No. 54), shall be denied.

III. CHOICE OF LAW

The relevant insurance policy states, “Indiana law shall govern all rights and claims raised under this Certificate of Insurance.” (Docket No. 55-1 [*12] at ¶6.) Relying upon this provision, the defendant asks the court to conclude that Indiana law applies to the claims raised in this case. (Docket Nos. 58, 59.) The plaintiff responds that Wisconsin law should apply because: (1) the defendant waived its opportunity to make a choice of law argument; (2) the choice of law provision is unconscionable; (3) the choice of law provision is contrary to Wisconsin public policy; (4) the choice of law provision would not apply to the plaintiff’s bad faith claim; (5) a common law choice of law analysis indicates that Wisconsin law should govern. (Docket No. 86.) The defendant replies that a common law choice of law analysis would actually favor Indiana, but in any event, the choice of law provision remains enforceable, is applicable to all the plaintiff’s claims, and the defendant did not waive the choice of law argument.

The court finds that Indiana law governs the present action. The court does not find that the defendant waived the choice of law argument. Choice of substantive law was not relevant to the court’s prior decisions and concluding now that Indiana law applies does not require the court to reassess any prior conclusion.

Nor does the [*13] court find the relevant provision unconscionable. Even accepting the plaintiff’s arguments that a reasonable person would not read the entire policy to recognize that it contained this choice of law provision, much less recognize its implications if he did, the court does not find the provision satisfies the high standard of unconscionability. The plaintiff does not point out what is supposedly so unfavorable about Indiana law that it would make it extremely unfair or oppressive to apply it in this case. If a reasonable person in the plaintiff’s position had been fully aware of the presence and consequences of the choice of law clause, the court has no reason to believe he would not have still agreed to the insurance policy he was offered.

The court finds the plaintiff’s argument that the choice of law provision violates Wisconsin public policy, (Docket No. 86 at 7-8), to be novel but misguided. In the plaintiff’s view, only Wisconsin law could ever govern an insurance dispute involving a Wisconsin resident because Wisconsin’s laws embody the public policy of the state and an insurance contract cannot ever be interpreted in a manner that offends the public policy of the state of Wisconsin. [*14] This argument is founded upon an overly-expansive reading of a quote of Couch on Insurance contained in Appleton Papers, Inc. v. Home Indem. Co., 2000 WI App 104, ¶44, 235 Wis. 2d 39, 612 N.W.2d 760:

A provision that a contract of insurance shall be governed by the law of a given state is void where such an express provision violates a statute of the state of the contract or would, if given force, evade statutory provisions declaring a rule of public policy with reference to contracts made within the jurisdiction, or where the contract stipulation would violate the interests and public policy of the state, since these cannot be changed by the contract of the parties.

What the Wisconsin Court of Appeals was actually saying in this quoted passage is that Wisconsin will not enforce a provision of an insurance contract that offends Wisconsin law simply because the contract contained a choice of law provision stating that the law of another state shall govern. It is for this reason that, notwithstanding the presence of the forum selection clause, it is appropriate to apply Wisconsin law to conclude that the forum selection clause was invalid. The plaintiff does not point to any Wisconsin law or public policy similarly barring [*15] choice of law provisions in insurance contracts. The court rejects the plaintiff’s argument that the court of appeals in Appleton Papers effectively found any choice of law provision unlawful.

Thus, the court turns to the plaintiff’s remaining argument that Wisconsin law would still apply to his bad faith claim. (Docket No. 86 at 8-9.) In support of this argument, the plaintiff begins with the terms of the choice of law provision: “Indiana law shall govern all rights and claims raised under this Certificate of Insurance,” (Docket No. 55-1 at ¶6). Redmond reads this provision as being limited to claims for insurance coverage. (Docket No. 86 at 8.) In Redmond’s view, a claim of bad faith is not “raised under” the policy but rather is a wholly distinct claim.

The court disagrees. Although bad faith is a tort and is distinct from breach of contract, in this case, it is the existence of the contract that creates the relationship necessary for a bad faith claim. Anderson v. Cont’l Ins. Co., 85 Wis. 2d 675, 687, 271 N.W.2d 368, 374 (1978) (the court looks to Wisconsin law here because that is the basis for the plaintiff’s argument). If there was no contract, there could be no claim of bad faith. [*16] Any bad faith claim will depend upon the scope and provisions of the contract. Because a bad faith claim is inextricably linked to the contract, in the court’s view, it is appropriately regarded as a “claim raised under this Certificate of Insurance.”

Accordingly, the court concludes that the choice of law provision contained within the policy is enforceable and applies to all of the plaintiff’s claims. Therefore, the defendant’s motion, (Docket No. 58), shall be granted, and Indiana substantive law shall govern this matter. Consequently, the court shall not consider arguments presented by the plaintiff that are founded solely in Wisconsin law or otherwise unsupported by reference to Indiana law.

IV. MOTIONS FOR SUMMARY JUDGMENT

Having concluded that Indiana law applies and this court must decide the present motions, the court turns to the parties’ motions for summary judgment. Sirius seeks summary judgment in its favor on both Redmond’s breach of contract, (Docket No. 70), and bad faith, (Docket No. 75), claims, as well as its cross-claim for breach of contract, (Docket No. 70), and with respect to the issue of future medical expenses, (Docket No. 66). Redmond seeks summary judgment [*17] on the question of coverage. (Docket No. 63.) The issues raised in all of the motions are largely inter-related and therefore the court shall address them together. At the core of the present dispute is the question of whether the relevant insurance policy afforded coverage for the injuries Redmond suffered and thus the court begins there.

A. Facts

On July 2, 2011, 32-year-old Redmond joined three acquaintances on a trip to ski the Ellingwood Couloir, located in Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming. (Docket No. 83, ¶1.) All were experienced skiers and Redmond considered himself an “expert,” having skied since age two and having skied competitively in high school. (Docket No. 83, ¶¶7-8.) Setting out at 1:00 or 2:00 AM, the group hiked up the mountain using crampons and ice axes to assist their assent. (Docket No. 83, ¶17-18.) Photographs of the group’s ascent have been included in the record. (See Docket No. 68-5.) By about 10:00 AM, the group was about two-thirds of the way up the Ellingwood Couloir when they stopped to rest. (Docket No. 83, ¶19.) Two of the group, including Redmond, rested about 30 minutes, removed their climbing gear, and prepared for their descent; two others continued [*18] climbing, intending to reach the top of the couloir before skiing down. (Docket No. 83, ¶¶25-26.) Redmond was first to ski down the mountain but after skiing only a short distance, he lost his balance and fell. (Docket No. 83, ¶28.) When he ceased tumbling down the mountain, he remained motionless, unconscious, and unresponsive. (Docket No. 83, ¶29.) He was eventually airlifted from the park for medical treatment. (Docket No. 83, ¶29.)

The relevant insurance policy that provided coverage for Redmond for the period of October 20, 2010 to October 20, 2011, contains the following exclusions:

All charges, costs, expenses and/or claims (collectively “Charges”) incurred by the Insured Person and directly or indirectly relating to or arising from or in connection with any of the following acts …:

* * *

(11) Charges incurred for any surgery, Treatment or supplies relating to, arising from or in connection with, for, or as a result of:

* * *

(d) any Injury or Illness sustained while taking part in mountaineering activities where specialized climbing equipment, ropes or guides are normally or reasonably should have been used, Amateur Athletics, Professional Athletics, aviation (except when traveling [*19] solely as a passenger in a commercial aircraft), hang gliding and parachuting, snow skiing except for recreational downhill and/or cross country snow skiing (no cover provided whilst skiing in violation of applicable laws, rules or regulations; away from prepared and marked in-bound territories; and/or against the advice of the local ski school or local authoritative body), racing of any kind including by horse, motor vehicle (of any type) or motorcycle, spelunking, and subaqua pursuits involving underwater breathing apparatus (except as otherwise expressly set forth in Section Q. Recreational Underwater Activities). Practice or training in preparation for any excluded activity which results in injury will be considered as activity while taking part in such activity; and/or

(e) any Illness or Injury sustained while participating in any sporting, recreational or adventure activity where such activity is undertaken against the advice or direction of any local authority or any qualified instructor or contrary to the rules, recommendations and procedures of a recognized governing body for the sport or activity….

(Docket No. 83, ¶33 (emphasis added).) Relying upon section (d) quoted above, [*20] Sirius denied Redmond’s claim. (Docket No. 83, ¶¶36, 38.)

B. Summary Judgment Standard

“The court shall grant summary judgment if the movant shows that there is no genuine dispute as to any material fact and the movant is entitled to judgment as a matter of law.” Fed. R. Civ. P. 56(a); see also Anderson v. Liberty Lobby, Inc., 477 U.S. 242, 248, 106 S. Ct. 2505, 91 L. Ed. 2d 202 (1986); Celotex Corp. v. Catrett, 477 U.S. 317, 324, 106 S. Ct. 2548, 91 L. Ed. 2d 265 (1986). A material fact is one that might affect the outcome of the case, and a nonmoving party’s dispute is “genuine” only if a reasonable finder of fact could find in the nonmoving party’s favor at trial. Anderson, 477 U.S. at 248-49. The court views the facts in the light most favorable to the non-moving party, and likewise it draws all inferences in the non-movant’s favor. Ault v. Speicher, 634 F.3d 942, 945 (7th Cir. 2011). The court may not weigh the evidence or make credibility determinations. Payne v. Pauley, 337 F.3d 767, 770 (7th Cir. 2003). Thus, the nonmoving party will defeat a motion for summary judgment if it is able to produce admissible evidence that, when viewed in the most favorable light, would be sufficient to enable the finder of fact to return a verdict in its favor. Fleishman v. Cont’l Cas. Co., 698 F.3d 598, 603 (7th Cir. 2012).

C. [*21] Analysis

“An insurance policy is a contract, and as such is subject to the same rules of construction as other contracts.” Dunn v. Meridian Mut. Ins. Co., 836 N.E.2d 249, 251 (Ind. 2005) (citing Allstate Ins. Co. v. Dana Corp., 759 N.E.2d 1049, 1054 (Ind. 2001)). Because contract interpretation is primarily a question of law, it is a matter that is generally well-suited for summary judgment. FLM, LLC v. Cincinnati Ins. Co., 973 N.E.2d 1167, 1174 (Ind. Ct. App. 2012) (citing Mahan v. Am. Std. Ins. Co., 862 N.E.2d 669, 676 (Ind. Ct. App. 2007)). “When interpreting an insurance contract courts must look at the contract as a whole.” Dunn, 836 N.E.2d at 252 (citing Meridian Mut. Ins. Co. v. Richie, 540 N.E.2d 27, 29 (Ind. 1989)). In construing an insurance contract, the court should do “so as not to render any words, phrases, or terms ineffective or meaningless.” FLM, 973 N.E.2d at 1174 (citing Mahan, 862 N.E.2d at 676). Terms should be given their plain and ordinary meaning. Id. (citing Mahan, 862 N.E.2d at 676). In determining the “plain and ordinary meaning” of a term, courts will frequently turn to dictionaries. See, e.g., Allgood v. Meridian Sec. Ins. Co., 836 N.E.2d 243, 247 (Ind. 2005); [*22] State Farm Mut. Auto. Ins. Co. v. D’Angelo, 875 N.E.2d 789, 797-98 (Ind. Ct. App. 2007).

However, if a provision of an insurance contract is ambiguous, it is to be construed strictly against the insurer. FLM, 973 N.E.2d at 1174 (quoting Lake States Ins. Co. v. Tech Tools, Inc., 743 N.E.2d 314, 318 (Ind. Ct. App. 2001)). An insurance contract is not ambiguous simply because parties each have their own interpretation of a provision. Id. (citing Mahan, 862 N.E.2d at 676). Rather, “[a]n insurance contract is ambiguous when it is susceptible to more than one interpretation and reasonably intelligent persons would honestly differ as to its meaning.” Id. (quoting Allstate Ins. Co. v. Bradtmueller, 715 N.E.2d 993, 997 (Ind. Ct. App. 1999)).

1. Mountaineering Exclusion

In its motion for summary judgment, the defendant begins with the contention that the plaintiff’s injuries directly or indirectly related to or arose from or were in connection with mountaineering activities “where specialized climbing equipment, ropes or guides are normally or reasonably should have been used.” Mountaineering is not defined in the policy.

There is no dispute between the parties that when he was ascending the mountain, [*23] Redmond was mountaineering. But Redmond was not injured on his ascent, and the parties disagree as to whether his descent on skis constituted mountaineering.

The Oxford English Dictionary defines “mountaineering” as, “The action or sport of climbing mountains.” Oxford English Dictionary, (January 15, 2014), http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/239554. Merriam-Webster similarly defines it as “the sport or technique of scaling mountains.” Merriam-Webster, (January 15, 2014), http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/mountaineering. The definition within the American Heritage Dictionary states, “The climbing of mountains, especially using special equipment and techniques on rock, ice, or snow. Also called mountain climbing.” American Heritage Dictionary, (January 15, 2014), http://www.ahdictionary.com/word/search.html?q=mountaineering.

If a person uses the word “climb” or “climbing” in common conversation, the connotation will generally be of an action involving ascent, e.g. climb a ladder, climbing stairs, or climb a tree. This understanding is reflected in the Oxford English Dictionary’s first definition of “climb,” which states, “To raise oneself by grasping or clinging, or by the aid of hands [*24] and feet; ‘to mount by means of some hold or footing’ (Johnson); to creep up; to ascend, come, or go up, a perpendicular or steep place. Often with up.” Oxford English Dictionary, (December 2, 2013), http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/34342 (emphasis in original).

But as any parent knows from having to frequently call after a rambunctious child, the word “climb” is often used alongside “down,” to denote descent, as in, “Climb down from there before you get hurt!” The Oxford English Dictionary recognizes this usage of “climb” as its second definition of the word “climb” stating, “to descend by the same means.” Oxford English Dictionary, (January 15, 2014), http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/34342.

Thus, if “mountaineering” is defined by reference to “climbing” and climbing can denote either ascent or descent, then necessarily, “mountaineering” must include both ascent and descent. The court finds this understanding of mountaineering to be the only logical definition. After all, in the context of mountaineering, the proverb “What goes up, must come down,” is generally literally true.

But a person is not necessarily “mountaineering” when he is descending a mountain simply because he ascended through [*25] mountaineering. A person who has helicopter waiting for him at a peak or who chooses to parasail off a mountain could not be appropriately regarding as “mountaineering” on his descent, notwithstanding the means of his ascent. Rather, as the Oxford English Dictionary notes in its second definition of “climb,” when used in the context of descent, the action must be “by the same means.” The court understands the “same means” to be referring to the means stated in the first definition of “climb,” i.e. “grasping or clinging, or by the aid of hands and feet.” Thus, whether ascending or descending a mountain by means of “grasping or clinging, or by the aid of hands and feet,” the person is “mountaineering.”

Here, Redmond generally hiked and climbed up and attempted to ski down. Obviously, skiing involves “the aid of hands and feet” but so do countless other obviously distinct activities. Common sense and common usage would not equate skiing with mountaineering; the actions are distinct in both connotation and denotation. Redmond engaged in mountaineering in order to go skiing but that predicate or the fact that the skiing occurred on a mountain (as skiing obviously often will) did not transform [*26] his skiing into mountaineering.

Nor does the court find persuasive the defendant’s argument that the policy’s expansive language barring coverage for injuries “arising from or in connection with, for, or as a result of … mountaineering” operates to bar coverage. Obviously, this provision serves a valuable purpose. Without it, perhaps a person who fell while mountaineering could argue that the mountaineering exclusion should not bar coverage because he was injured when he fell, not when he was mountaineering, which, by definition, would not include an uncontrolled fall. But the defendant’s argument stretches this provision too far. In the view of the defendant, because the causal chain the resulted in Redmond’s injury included a mountaineering link, coverage must be barred. The court disagrees.

The court also rejects the defendant’s contention that the mountaineering exclusion encompasses “ski mountaineering,” which the defendant characterizes as a subset of mountaineering. The plaintiff contends that ski mountaineering requires ropes and other specialized equipment that he was not using on the descent, (Docket No. 64 at 23-24), but even accepting for present discussion that Redmond’s [*27] acts fell within a broad definition of “ski mountaineering,” the court finds that the mountaineering exclusion does not encompass the distinct activity of ski mountaineering. In describing the mountaineering exclusion, the policy states that mountaineering involves activities “where specialized climbing equipment, ropes or guides are normally or reasonably should have been used.” Here, Redmond’s downhill skiing would not have called for specialized climbing equipment, ropes, or guides, and thus, even if it came within a broad general definition of “ski mountaineering,” the activity would not come within the policy’s description of “mountaineering.”

Therefore, the court concludes that the mountaineering exclusion does not apply in this case. Thus, the court turns to whether any of the policy’s skiing exclusions apply.

2. Skiing Exclusions

In the portion of the insurance policy listing its exclusions, it also states:

“any Injury or Illness sustained while taking part in … snow skiing except for recreational downhill and/or cross country snow skiing (no cover provided whilst skiing in violation of applicable laws, rules or regulations; away from prepared and marked in-bound territories; [*28] and/or against the advice of the local ski school or local authoritative body)….”

This provision, moving back and forth between coverage and exclusions, is far from a model of clarity. It first excludes coverage for injuries sustained while snow skiing but then immediately excludes from the exclusion (and thus covers) injuries sustained while “recreational downhill and/or cross country snow skiing,” and then adds a parenthetical to now exclude from the exclusion to the exclusion (and thus deny coverage for) injuries sustained while “skiing in violation of applicable laws, rules or regulations; away from prepared and marked in-bound territories; and/or against the advice of the local ski school or local authoritative body.” The net effect of this provision is that injuries sustained as a result of recreational snow skiing are covered provided the skiing was not unlawful, against the advice of certain entities, or “away from prepared and marked in-bound territories.”

The defendant argues that the plaintiff’s skiing was not “recreational” and points to a case where a court found that a life insurance policy did not provide coverage for an insured who was killed in an avalanche while heli-skiing [*29] (traveling via helicopter to a remote location on a mountain and then skiing down the mountain) because, although the insured listed skiing as one of his “recreational activities” he did not disclose that he engaged in backcountry heli-skiing. (Docket No. 81 at 8-12 (discussing W. Coast Life Ins. Co. v. Hoar, 505 F. Supp. 2d 734 (D. Colo. 2007)).) However, Hoar is distinguishable in that the issue before that court was not whether a policy exclusion applied but rather whether the insurer had adequate notice of the risk it was undertaking when it relied upon his application to issue the policy. Moreover, the court’s conclusion that the insurer was not adequately informed of its risk was not based solely upon the fact that the insured identified simply skiing, as opposed to heli-skiing, as a recreational activity, but also the fact that the insured did not disclose heli-skiing when asked if he engaged in “any hazardous activities.” Id. at 744-49.

“Recreational” is not ambiguous. It is readily understood as, “An activity or pastime which is pursued for the pleasure or interest it provides.” Oxford English Dictionary, (January 15, 2014), http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/159954. Thus, competitive [*30] or commercial skiing likely would not be covered under the policy. There is no evidence that Redmond was skiing for any purpose other than the pure pleasure or interest the sport provides, and thus the court concludes that Redmond’s skiing on the day of his injury was recreational.

Nor is there reason to conclude that his skiing was unlawful or against the advice of any relevant entity. The next question is whether he was skiing “away from prepared and marked in-bound territories” when he was injured.

In Redmond’s view, this phrase, when read alongside the other exclusions, means simply that there is no coverage if he is skiing in an area where he has been told not to ski. (Docket No. 64 at 27.) Thus, the exclusion would not apply here because he was skiing in an area where skiing was permitted; in effect, because skiing was permitted anywhere within Grand Teton National Park, the whole park was a prepared and in-bound territory. (Docket No. 64 at 27.)

Moreover, the term “away from” is ambiguous in the view of the plaintiff. It may be interpreted strictly to suggest the skier’s direction. Thus, there would be no coverage if a skier started on a marked and prepared in-bound area but then [*31] left that area. Or, perhaps, there might be coverage for out-of-bounds skiing provided the skier’s path, at some point, would intersect a marked and prepared in-bound territory and thus he was going towards, rather than away from, the in-bound territory. Therefore, a skier taking a shortcut through an out-of-bounds area would still be covered because he was going towards in-bound territory. Alternatively “away from” might be much broader, meaning generally, “outside,” as in how one might say she is “away from home.”

The court does not find the phrase “away from” to be ambiguous. Simply because a term has more than one denotation does not make it ambiguous; otherwise, the majority of words would probably be ambiguous. The differing understandings must also be reasonable given the context before the court will find a term ambiguous. The latter understanding, i.e. that “away from” means, roughly, “outside,” is the only reasonable understanding of the term given the context in which it is used. There may be some arguable ambiguity as to how far from the prepared and in-bound territory a person must be to be “away from” such territory, e.g. whether the term should be read like the NFL rulebook [*32] where one foot on the line is out of bounds or if there might be a sort of “bubble” around a covered territory so that coverage does not necessarily end at a strict boundary line, see York v. Sterling Ins. Co., 114 A.D.2d 665, 666-67, 494 N.Y.S.2d 243 (N.Y. App. Div. 3d Dep’t 1985) (holding that policy provision excluding coverage for injuries “away from” the insured’s property did not bar coverage for injuries sustained when a person riding a dirt bike on insured’s property lost control, traveled over the insured’s property line, and was injured). The follow-up question as to precisely how far one must be to be “away from” is not an issue presently before this court, although it may be relevant for trial. Thus, the court turns its focus to what is meant by “prepared and marked in-bound territories.”

The court rejects the plaintiff’s contention that the court must lump all the exclusions together and conclude that they mean simply that there is coverage so long as he was not skiing in an area where skiing was not banned. Such an interpretation offends the maxim of contract interpretation that, to the extent possible, every term and provision must be given meaning. In saying that there is no coverage [*33] if Redmond was skiing away from prepared and marked in-bound territories, this plainly encompasses more than simply skiing in an area where skiing is not barred. Thus, having concluded that “away from” means roughly “outside of,” restating this exclusion as a positive question, the issue before the court becomes, “Was Redmond skiing in a prepared and marked in-bound territory when he was injured?” Only if he was would the policy possibly afford coverage for his injures.

The plaintiff’s focus upon “in-bound” overlooks two other essential components to the exclusion–“prepared” and “marked.” The plaintiff refers to these terms in only a single inconsequential footnote, (Docket No. 64 at 31, n. 14).) If the plaintiff does not regard his argument on this point worthy of inclusion of the text of his brief, the court hardly regards it as worthy of much consideration; in fact, the court previously expressed its disapproval of the plaintiff’s efforts to raise arguments in footnotes, (Docket No. 80 at 4).

The court agrees with the defendant that “prepared” and “marked” are words of ordinary use. However, this fact does not necessarily mean that the terms are unambiguous as used in the policy. [*34] The only argument offered by either party that approaches a definition of the term “prepared” is the defendant’s suggestion that it means “groomed.” (Docket Nos. 71 at 23; 103 at 3, 9.) As for “marked” there is only the defendant’s footnote where it notes that Redmond testified he did not observe ropes, signs, fences, or other defined physical boundaries on the mountain that day. (Docket No. 71 at 21-22, fn.78.)

The court finds that both “prepared” and “marked” are subject to different interpretations. Again, simply because there are differing interpretations does not mean that the terms are ambiguous or that the policy affords coverage. Rather, for the term to be ambiguous, the differing interpretations must both be reasonable such that “intelligent persons would honestly differ as to its meaning.” Stevenson by Freeman v. Hamilton Mut. Ins. Co., 672 N.E.2d 467, 471 (Ind. Ct. App. 1996) (citing Harden v. Monroe Guaranty Ins. Co., 626 N.E.2d 814, 817 (Ind. Ct. App. 1993)). There is coverage only if one of those reasonable understandings is consistent with coverage. Thus, the court looks to the various meanings of these terms.

While “marked” is readily understood as having some sort of [*35] visible identification, see Oxford English Dictionary, (January 15, 2014), http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/114174, what is unclear is what sort of mark must be utilized or what these marks must indicate. The court presumes that if a ski area is bordered on the sides by signs and ropes demarcating the boundaries of the permissible skiing area, it is likely “marked” within the scope of the policy. But is this the only kind of identification that will render an area “marked?” What if the area is depicted on a map that includes boundary lines indicating the recommended areas for skiing? If markings on a map are sufficient, who must prepare such a map to render the area marked? Must the map be prepared by the entity in charge of the area, e.g. the National Park Service, or would a map prepared by a person with special knowledge of the area suffice? Or must the markings even relate to the in-bound territories? Would a sign in the vicinity of the mountain stating “Ski at your own risk,” suffice as a marking? Perhaps there are many other plausible understandings of this term.

As for “prepared,” again this term has a readily understandable common meaning, e.g. “To bring into a suitable condition [*36] for some future action or purpose; to make ready in advance; to fit out, equip.” Oxford English Dictionary, (January 15, 2014), http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/150447. This definition is exceptionally broad and thus its application to the context of skiing is unclear. Even the defendant’s own expert testified that he was not familiar with what this might mean in the context of skiing. (Docket No. 68-15 at 32.)

If ground has snow on it, to many persons, it is “prepared” for skiing in that it has been brought into a suitable condition for skiing, and thus the policy may be simply excluding coverage when persons attempt to ski on surfaces not suitable for skiing. Or must there be some sort of human intervention? (See Docket No. 68-12 at 12.) If so, what sort of intervention? In the context of backcountry skiing, would inspection for or the mitigation of avalanche dangers be adequate preparation of the territory? If so, who must do this? Or must there be, as the defendant seems to suggest, formal grooming of the area, using, for example, a snow grooming machine? If the latter definition is appropriate, then would there be coverage under the policy if an insured was making a run after a fresh [*37] snowfall, or must he wait for the snow grooming machine to make a pass over the slopes?

The court finds that neither party has adequately articulated, much less supported, an appropriate conclusive meaning for these terms. While the defendant’s understanding of the terms “prepared” and “marked” is, as discussed below in conjunction with the plaintiff’s bad faith claim, reasonable, this understanding is not necessarily the only reasonable understanding. Therefore, because the court is not satisfied that the terms are unambiguous and support the conclusion that there is no coverage under the policy, the court cannot grant the defendant’s motion for summary judgment. However, nor can the court grant the plaintiff’s motion for summary judgment because the plaintiff has not adequately demonstrated that the terms are, in fact, ambiguous and/or support a finding of coverage. The plaintiff largely asks the court to read the terms out of the policy rather than presenting an alternative reasonable understanding of these terms that is consistent with coverage. Although the court offers here hypothetical interpretations of these terms to demonstrate how they terms are not necessarily un-ambiguous, [*38] absent the defendant’s opportunity to respond to these interpretations, the court is not prepared to conclude that any of these proffered interpretations is reasonable. And in any event, even if reasonable, the court could not conclude that the proffered interpretation would be consistent with coverage because the plaintiff has not presented any such factual support to the court.

Consequently, neither party has succeeded in establishing that summary judgment is warranted on their respective motions relating to coverage. Because the understanding of “in-bound” appears to be at least partially dependent upon the definitions of both “prepared” and “marked,” the court finds itself similarly unable to fix a definition of this term at this time. Therefore, the parties’ motions for summary judgment regarding coverage, (Docket Nos. 63, 70), shall be denied.

3. Future Medical Expenses

Based upon its reading of the plaintiff’s complaint, the defendant understood that the plaintiff was seeking payment for medical expenses related to the accident but not incurred prior to the time the policy terminated. Thus, the defendant filed a motion seeking to foreclose this perceived request for damages. (Docket [*39] No. 66.) In response, the plaintiff states that he is seeking coverage only for medical expenses incurred between the date of the accident, July 2, 2011, and the date his coverage expired, October 19, 2012. The reference in the complaint to “costs of the medical care he will continue to receive in the future,” (Docket No. 1-1 at ¶40), was not a demand for coverage beyond the policy period but rather was necessitated by the fact that the complaint was filed within the policy period. In reply, the defendant asks the court to strike the pertinent portion of the complaint and declare that future medical expenses are not available to the plaintiff.

The court finds that the defendant’s motion, (Docket No. 66), is moot and therefore shall be denied as such. Further, the court finds no reason to strike any portion of the plaintiff’s complaint. The parties agree that the plaintiff is not entitled to payment for medical expenses incurred outside the policy period and the court does not read the complaint as seeking such damages. Thus, there is no controversy on this point that requires action by this court.

4. Bad Faith

It is well-established that insurers have a duty to deal in good faith with [*40] their insureds. Monroe Guar. Ins. Co. v. Magwerks Corp., 829 N.E.2d 968, 975 (Ind. 2005) (citing Freidline v. Shelby Ins. Co., 774 N.E.2d 37, 40 (Ind. 2002). “As a general proposition, ‘[a] finding of bad faith requires evidence of a state of mind reflecting dishonest purpose, moral obliquity, furtive design, or ill will.'” Magwerks, 829 N.E.2d 968, 977 (Ind. 2005) (quoting Colley v. Indiana Farmers Mut. Ins. Group, 691 N.E.2d 1259, 1261 (Ind. Ct. App. 1998)). This may be proven if the plaintiff can establish by clear and convincing evidence “that the insurer had knowledge that there was no legitimate basis for denying liability.” Id. at 976 (quoting Freidline, 774 N.E.2d at 40). “Poor judgment or negligence do not amount to bad faith.” Lumbermens Mut. Cas. Co. v. Combs, 873 N.E.2d 692, 714 (Ind. Ct. App. 2007) (quoting State Farm Mut. Auto Ins. Co. v. Gutierrez, 844 N.E.2d 572, 580 (Ind. Ct. App. 2006). Nor is the lack of a diligent investigation sufficient to support a finding of bad faith. Id. (quoting Gutierrez, 844 N.E.2d at 580). Thus, bad faith is not synonymous with a breach of contract. Even if a denial of coverage was improper, it was not necessarily done in bad faith. Id. [*41] (quoting Erie Ins. Co. v. Hickman, 622 N.E.2d 515 (Ind. 1993)).

Redmond’s claim of bad faith is two-pronged. The first prong is Sirius’ conduct before the suit was filed; the second is Sirius’ conduct in defending this suit and pursuing a counterclaim against Redmond.

With respect to Sirius’ pre-litigation conduct, Redmond contends that Sirius acted in bad faith when it failed to conduct an adequate investigation into his claim and denied his claim. Sirius contends that its investigation was appropriate and its decision reasonable. In support, it points primarily to its “claim log,” which it provided to the court, (Docket No. 73-24). However, absent appropriate foundation to establish that this document is a business record under Fed. R. Evid. 803(6), this document is inadmissible hearsay. The defendant fails to support this document by an affidavit or declaration, nor has the defendant directed the court to any relevant deposition testimony that could provide the necessary foundation.

The defendant also relies upon the deposition testimony of Tammie Peters (“Peters”), the person ultimately responsible for denying Redmond’s claim. However, the defendant has provided the court with only [*42] nine pages of her 154 page deposition (three of the provided pages comprise the cover and certification pages), and not always the pages relied upon by the defendant, (see, e.g., Docket No. 73 at ¶130 (citing “Ex. W, Peters Dep. 10:7-9” which is not included in Docket No. 73-23).) In her deposition, Peters is asked to review Exhibit 11, (see Docket No. 68-10), which the questioner posits consists of articles found on the internet and placed in the claims file of Sirius’ underwriter. (Docket No. 73-23 at 6.) At no point in the deposition excerpts provided to the court by the defendant does Peters authenticate these documents or testify that she relied solely upon them to make her coverage decision. Other documents attached to the defendant’s proposed findings of fact and cited by defendant in its proposed findings of fact and in its briefs are similarly un-authenticated. The only other testimony in the portion of Peters’ deposition provided to the court by the defendant that indicates the basis for Peters’ decision to deny Redmond’s claim is her statement that another employee offered his opinion that the claim was not covered because he reviewed an ambulance report and had done some [*43] internet research regarding where Redmond was skiing. (Docket No. 73-23 at 5.)

In contrast to the defendant’s submissions, the plaintiff has provided the court with the entirety of Peters’ deposition and thus the court turns to this document. (Docket No. 68-12.) Having reviewed this document, the court is able to fill in many of the gaps left by the defendant. In her deposition, Peters discusses Exhibit 7, which she describes as “insured notes” comprised of “notes that were put under the insured, Ryan Redmond.” (Docket No. 68-12 at 15.) Exhibit 7, which was provided to the court by the plaintiff as Docket No. 68-7, is largely the same as the “claim log,” (Docket No. 73-24), provided by the defendant, although the formatting of these documents differs and Docket No. 68-7 includes pages and entries beyond those included in the defendant’s excerpt. Based upon this more complete review, the court concludes that Peters’ testimony regarding this document is sufficient to bring the document within Fed. R. Evid. 803(6), and thus it may be appropriately considered by the court in deciding the present motion.

This document indicates that the decision to deny coverage was made by at least July [*44] 29, 2011. (Docket Nos. 73-24 at 3; 68-12 at 20.) The notes indicate that on July 5, 2011, the underwriter was informed that Redmond was in a “skiing accident with a head injury.” (Docket No. 73-24 at 6.) An hour later, another employer of the underwriter spoke with personnel at the hospital and noted, “Admitted through ER / head trauma / fall from cliff.” (Docket No. 73-24 at 5.) Ten days later, following a conversation with the helicopter ambulance service that assisted in Redmond’s rescue, the notes state, “Appeared scene was Lupine Meadows, but was unsure if that is a ski resort or park.” (Docket No. 73-24 at 4.) Later that day, a follow-up call confirmed that Lupine Meadows was in Grand Teton National Park. (Docket No. 73-24 at 4.) Four days thereafter, the underwriter communicated to the hospital that there might not be coverage because preliminary investigation indicated Redmond’s “injuries were as a result of backcountry skiing.” (Docket No. 73-24 at 4.)

The court is not able to find that the information contained in this document was necessarily sufficient to deny Redmond’s claim. Thus, the court looks to what other information was available to the underwriter. Peters testified [*45] that she also relied upon a report from the helicopter ambulance service that transported Redmond. (Docket No. 68-12 at 20.) This report is included in Exhibit AA to Sirius’ statement of proposed facts, (Docket No. 73-27 at 12-16), and, like many of the defendant’s exhibits, is not authenticated by way of a declaration, affidavit, or deposition testimony. Nonetheless, the court shall consider it because the plaintiff does not dispute that this document is the Omniflight Helicopters-Idaho medical records received by the underwriter. (Docket No. 96, ¶107.) The portion of this report captioned “History of Present Illness” states, in part, “Pt had been backcountry skiing when he fell down steep slope approx. 800 ft. Took approx. 2 hrs before pt could be reached.” (Docket No. 73-27 at 12.)

Taken together, all of this information provided a reasonable basis to deny Redmond’s claim pursuant to the skiing exclusion in the policy. As discussed above, the terms “prepared” and “marked,” as used within the skiing exclusion, can be reasonably understood in different ways. One such reasonable understanding would be the understanding that Peters testified she held, which there is no coverage for skiing [*46] outside of the boundaries of a ski run at a traditional ski resort. One could reasonably understand “backcountry skiing” to mean that Redmond was necessarily not skiing at a traditional ski resort. Subsequent information further corroborated the conclusion that Redmond was skiing in a remote wilderness area. (See Docket No. 73-14 (National Park Service Search & Rescue Report received by the underwriter on Sept. 15, 2011).) Thus, based upon the information provided, the decision to deny coverage was reasonable. This decision might prove incorrect, but it was not done in bad faith. There is simply no evidence that could permit a reasonable finder of fact to conclude by clear and convincing evidence that Peters’ decision to deny the claim was the result of a “dishonest purpose, moral obliquity, furtive design, or ill will.”

Thus, the court turns to the question of whether Sirius’ conduct in this litigation might form the basis for a claim of bad faith. Redmond argues that Sirius acted in bad faith by using tactics to try to get Redmond to concede Sirius’ counterclaim, which Sirius eventually withdrew, and by failing to reconsider the denial of coverage after certain deposition testimony. [*47] (Docket No. 89 at 9.)

On the issue of post-litigation conduct vis-à-vis bad faith, courts across the country have been dealing with two distinct issues. The first is evidentiary: whether an insurer’s conduct in litigation following the filing of a claim alleging bad faith might be used as evidence to support that claim of bad faith. The second is substantive: whether an insurer’s conduct in litigation might itself form the basis for a claim of bad faith. The Court of Appeals of Indiana addressed these issues in Gooch v. State Farm Mut. Auto. Ins. Co., 712 N.E.2d 38 (Ind. Ct. App. 1999), and noted the general reluctance of courts to permit post-litigation conduct as evidence to support a prior claim of bad faith. Id. at 42 (discussing Howard v. State Farm Mut. Auto. Ins. Co., 316 S.C. 445, 450 S.E.2d 582 (1994); Palmer v. Farmers Ins. Exch., 261 Mont. 91, 861 P.2d 895 (1993); Nationwide Mut. Ins. Co. v. Clay, 525 So. 2d 1339 (Ala.1987)). With respect to the second question, however, the Court of Appeals of Indiana concluded that when an insurer is sued, under certain circumstances, its post-litigation conduct might form an independent basis for a new bad faith claim.

In Gooch, the plaintiff [*48] sued her insurer seeking coverage under the uninsured motorist provision of her policy. After the action was filed, the defendant insurer insisted that she also pursue an action against another individual in a foreign jurisdiction, an action the plaintiff believed would be frivolous. Believing that the insurance company was making these demands to frustrate her suit and thus pressure her to settle, the plaintiff amended her complaint to also allege bad faith. The court of appeals concluded that such litigation conduct by an insurer might present a cognizable claim of bad faith, and in doing so the court emphasized that the plaintiff was relying upon conduct that occurred only before she filed her bad faith claim.

What Redmond is attempting to allege here are two distinct bad faith claims. The first related to the denial of his claim; the second related to Sirius’ conduct in the litigation. But as the court addressed in a prior order, (Docket No. 80), Redmond’s complaint raises bad faith only with respect to Sirius’ denial of his claim. Although Gooch involved a case initiated on a wholly distinct coverage claim, an insurer is likely not absolved of its duty of good faith simply because [*49] a plaintiff, like Redmond, initiates a suit alleging bad faith. If a suit is commenced containing a claim of bad faith and an insurer subsequently engages in litigation conduct that itself constitutes a distinct claim of bad faith, in accordance with Gooch, that plaintiff may amend her complaint to state a second distinct claim of bad faith.

Here, Redmond did not seek to amend his complaint to add a claim of post-litigation bad faith. Instead, he has attempted to expand the bad faith claim in his complaint by supplementing his discovery responses. The defendant objected and, as is fully discussed in this court’s prior order, (Docket No. 80), the court rejected this means of constructively amending his complaint. There was no amended complaint and therefore no such claim of post-litigation bad faith is properly before the court. Thus, Redmond necessarily cannot obtain the relief he seeks. Accordingly, the court shall grant the defendant’s motion for summary judgment as to the entirety of Redmond’s bad faith claim.

V. MOTION TO STRIKE PLAINTIFF’S DEMAND FOR A JURY TRIAL

Alongside its choice of law and venue provisions, the insurance policy also states, “All trials regarding disputes under [*50] this insurance shall be exclusively presented to and determined solely by the court as the trier of fact, without a jury.”

The plaintiff contends that this waiver of his right to a jury trial is unenforceable because it was not knowingly and intelligently made and the jury waiver provision is unconscionable. (Docket No. 95.) In reply, the defendant cites IFC Credit Corp. v. United Bus. & Indus. Fed. Credit Un., 512 F.3d 989, 993-94 (7th Cir. 2008), for the proposition that a jury waiver provision need not be knowing, voluntary, or intentional to be enforceable. (Docket No. 102 at 2-3.) However, the contract at issue in IFC was a traditional commercial contract under the Uniform Commercial Code. Although insurance policies are a form of contract and traditional rules of contract interpretation are applied, there is a vast difference between a UCC agreement for the sale of goods and a consumer insurance policy.

In deciding whether a contract provision waiving the right to a jury trial is enforceable, the court looks to the state substantive law that governs the contract. IFC, 512 F.3d at 994. Thus, the court looks to Indiana law. The plaintiff cites only Wisconsin law; the defendant, although [*51] citing Indiana law, does not identify any Indiana case explicitly addressing the question of a jury trial waiver in an insurance contract. The court’s own research has failed to identify any court that has applied Indiana law to directly answer this question.

Notwithstanding, the Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit noted that when it comes to the waiver of the right to a jury trial, an agreement to arbitrate a claim (and thus give up not only a jury trial but a judicial forum altogether) is arguably more onerous than an agreement to simply have a claim heard by a court instead of a jury, yet arbitration agreements are regularly enforced in all sorts of contracts without any special requirements. Id. Thus, in the absence of any case law addressing the validity of an insurance contract provision waiving simply the right to a jury trial, the court looks to how Indiana would regard a similar provision waiving the right to present a claim in any judicial forum.

Indiana law does not prohibit the use of arbitration provisions in insurance contracts, see Ind. Code sec. 34-57-2-1; rather, Indiana has a strong policy in favor of enforcing arbitration provisions in all contracts, including [*52] insurance contracts, see, e.g., Pekin Ins. Co. v. Hanquier, 984 N.E.2d 227, 228 (Ind. Ct. App. 2013); HemoCleanse, Inc. v. Phila. Indem. Ins. Co., 831 N.E.2d 259, 262 (Ind. Ct. App. 2005).

If an insurer can include in a standard insurance contract a provision whereby an insured will give up his right to not only a trial by jury but also the right to bring his action in any court, the court has little reason to conclude that a provision waiving the right to a jury trial is inherently unenforceable or any extraordinary means are necessary to render it effective. Thus, the court shall enforce the contract as written.

The plaintiff also raises separate arguments limited to the applicability of the waiver of the right to a jury trial to his bad faith claim. These arguments are basically a restatement of the arguments the plaintiff offered to support his contention that the choice of law provision did not apply to the bad faith claim. For the same reasons set forth above in the discussion of that motion, the court would reject these arguments. But more importantly, having concluded that the defendant is entitled to summary judgment on the plaintiff’s bad faith claim, this aspect of the plaintiff’s [*53] argument is moot.

Finally, the court rejects the plaintiff’s argument that the defendant waived the opportunity to object to the plaintiff’s demand for a jury trial. Under the circumstances of this case, the court finds the present stage of litigation to be an appropriate time for the defendant to raise its objection. Therefore, the defendant’s motion to strike the plaintiff’s demand for a trial by jury, (Docket No. 50), shall be granted.

VI. DEFENDANT’S MOTION TO STRIKE PLAINTIFF’S EXPERT REPORT

The defendant objects to opinions offered by the plaintiff’s expert, Daniel Doucette (“Doucette”), many of which are now moot in light of the court’s decisions on other motions. Thus, having concluded that the defendant is entitled to summary judgment on the plaintiff’s bad faith claim, Doucette’s opinions on this topic are no longer relevant. The only topic on which Doucette opined that remains to be resolved is the question of what the phrase “away from prepared and marked in-bound territories” means.

On this topic, Doucette’s conclusions read more like a legal brief than the opinions of an expert. (See Docket No. 61-1 at 19.) He does not opine as to how this phrase is commonly understood in [*54] the insurance industry, but rather offers general conclusions as to what this phrase might mean in the context of skiing. Although Redmond argues that Doucette is qualified to testify also as a ski expert, (Docket No. 91 at 9-10), the court is not persuaded. Doucette may be an experienced skier, but absent additional knowledge, skill, training, or education, the court finds that Doucette is not qualified to testify as an expert on skiing. The court is not going to open the witness stand to a parade of recreational skiers, each of whom would opine as to the meaning of the relevant phrase. An expert is supposed to assist the trier of fact and Doucette’s opinion on these phrases is not at all helpful.

Therefore, to the extent that his opinions are not moot, the court shall grant the defendant’s motion to exclude Doucette from testifying and strike his expert report, (Docket No. 60).

VII. MOTIONS TO STRIKE

Redmond moved to strike portions of the Sirius’ brief in support of its motion for summary judgment on the plaintiff’s bad faith claim, (Docket No. 84), and to strike Sirius’s reply to its proposed findings of fact, (Docket No. 107.)

The first motion to strike, (Docket No. 84), relates to [*55] the fact that in its brief in support of its motion for summary judgment, Sirius relied upon an email exchange it had not previously disclosed in discovery on the grounds that it was privileged, (see Docket No. 76 at 9-10). In response, Sirius apparently does not oppose the motion to strike, (Docket No. 97 at 4 (“Sirius will withdraw the previously withheld document at issue…”); its opposition is limited to the request for sanctions. Having considered the parties’ briefs on the matter, the court does not find that sanctions are appropriate. Therefore, the motion to strike shall be granted; the request for sanctions shall be denied.

The second motion to strike relates to the fact that Sirius replied to Redmond’s response to Sirius’ proposed findings of fact. Responding to this motion, Sirius’ counsel acknowledges that he misread what was permissible under the relevant local rule, Civ. L.R. 56(b)(3)(B), and agrees to withdraw the pleading. (Docket No. 109.) Therefore, the defendant having withdrawn the relevant pleading, (Docket No. 106), the motion to strike, (Docket No. 107), is moot.

VIII. CONCLUSION

Notwithstanding his travels, Redmond was “residing in” Wisconsin when he renewed his [*56] travel insurance policy with Sirius. Therefore, under Wis. Stat. § 631.83(3)(b), the policy’s forum selection clause is unenforceable. Balancing all other relevant factors, the court does not find that transfer to the Southern District of Indiana pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 1404(a) is appropriate. Therefore, Sirius’ motion to transfer will be denied.

However, the choice of law provision within the contract shall be given its effect, and therefore Sirius’ motion for an order holding that Indiana law applies to the present case will be granted.

As for the parties’ motions for summary judgment, the court concludes that the mountaineering exclusion is unambiguous and does not exclude coverage for Redmond’s injuries. As for the skiing exclusion, Redmond was engaged in recreational skiing, and there is no evidence that Redmond was skiing “in violation of applicable laws, rules or regulations … and/or against the advice of the local ski school or local authoritative body.” However, the provision excluding coverage for skiing “away from prepared and marked in-bound territories” is subject to varying interpretations and the evidence before the court is insufficient to enable the court to conclude [*57] that either party is entitled to summary judgment on the question of whether the policy provides coverage for Redmond’s injuries.

The court shall grant the defendant’s motion for summary judgment with respect to the plaintiff’s bad faith claim. The evidence is insufficient to permit a reasonable finder of fact to conclude that Sirius acted in bad faith in denying Redmond’s claim. Moreover, Sirius’ litigation conduct cannot form the basis for a bad faith claim because Redmond never amended his complaint to state such a claim.

The defendant’s motion to strike the plaintiff’s demand for a jury trial is granted in accordance with the plain language of the policy, and therefore in any trial in this matter, the court shall serve as the finder of fact.

The report of plaintiff’s expert Daniel Doucette is largely moot in light of other conclusions by the court, but to the extent it is not moot, the defendant’s motion to strike is granted. The plaintiff lacks the qualifications to testify as an expert on skiing and his opinions regarding the meaning of the phrase “away from prepared and marked in-bound territories” are insufficiently supported to come within the appropriate ambit of an expert.

Finally, [*58] with respect to the plaintiff’s motions to strike, the defendant concedes both. Therefore, the plaintiff’s motion to strike portions of the defendant’s brief in support of its motion for summary judgment is granted and its reply to the plaintiff’s response to the defendant’s proposed findings of fact is deemed withdrawn. The court declines to impose sanctions.

IT IS THEREFORE ORDERED that the defendant’s motion to transfer this case to the United States District Court for the Southern District of Indiana, (Docket No. 54), is denied.

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that the defendant’s motion to strike the plaintiff’s demand for a jury trial, (Docket No. 56), is granted.

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that the defendant’s motion for an order that Indiana law governs the plaintiff’s claims, (Docket No. 58), is granted.

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that the defendant’s motion to exclude and strike the expert report of Daniel Doucette, (Docket No. 60), is granted to the extent that the motion is not moot.

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that the plaintiff’s motion for summary judgment on coverage, (Docket No. 63), is denied.

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that the defendant’s motion for summary judgment on future medical expenses, (Docket [*59] No. 66), is denied as moot.

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that the defendant’s motion for summary judgment on the plaintiff’s breach of contract claim and the defendant’s breach of contract counterclaim, (Docket No. 70), is denied

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that the defendant’s motion for summary judgment on the plaintiff’s bad faith claim, (Docket No. 75), is granted.

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that the plaintiff’s expedited non-dispositive motion to strike, (Docket No. 84), is granted. The request for sanctions is denied.

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that the plaintiff’s expedited non-dispositive motion to strike, (Docket No. 107), is denied as moot. The defendant’s reply, (Docket No. 106), is considered withdrawn.

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that the court shall hold a telephonic conference on January 28, 2014 at 9:00 AM (CST) to discuss scheduling this matter for trial. The court will initiate the call. Not less than 48 hours before the call, counsel participating in the call shall provide to the court via email to GoodsteinPO@wied.uscourts.gov a direct telephone number where counsel may be reached for the call. The court strongly discourages the use of mobile phones for conference calls.

Dated at Milwaukee, Wisconsin [*60] this 15th day of January, 2014.

/s/ Aaron E. Goodstein

AARON E. GOODSTEIN

U.S. Magistrate Judge

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American Alpine Club Journal is Looking for your Stories

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AAJ_Contribute_Graphic.6.jpgHi James,This year we will be delivering the American Alpine Journal in July, a month earlier—and that means our deadlines are approaching fast!

The AAJ is a collaborative effort, built by climbers and contributors like you from around the world. This means we depend on you and your friends to contribute your eyes and ears.

Get involved: Did you or someone you know do a new route in 2013? Did you climb or hear about a new route that’s regionally significant? Even if it’s only a few pitches long, we want to know about it. Maybe you discovered a new climbing area or did a first free ascent? Foreign expedition? Huge alpine climb? A new big-wall route? Well, the AAJ is the place to document it. Contribute to the 2014 AAJ.

We look forward to building this year’s AAJ with your input. Please contact us no later than January 31.

TELL US YOUR STORY